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Glamorama, Engl. ed. (Roman) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 10. Dezember 1999


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 496 Seiten
  • Verlag: MacMillan; Auflage: New edition (10. Dezember 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0330372092
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330372091
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 19,7 x 13 x 3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (190 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 490.293 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Bret Easton Ellis, geboren 1964 in einem Vorort von Los Angeles, wohnhaft in New York City, gilt als einer der kontroversesten, aber auch sprachgewaltigsten jungen Autoren seiner Generation. Mit 19 schrieb er seinen Debütroman, einen schonungslosen Zustandsbericht über das dekadente aber orientierungslose Leben der Yuppies in den 80ern, der 1996 erfolgreich verfilmt wurde. 1987 erschien sein zweiter Roman bevor er 1991 endgültig zum Kultautor aufstieg.

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Glamorama is a satirical mass-murder opus more ambitious than Ellis's 1990 American Psycho. It starts as a spritz-of-consciousness romp about kid-club entrepreneur Victor Ward, "the It boy of the moment," an actor/model up for Flatliners II. Ellis has perfect pitch for glam-speak, and he gives nightlife the fizz, pace, and shimmer it lacks in drab reality. Anyone could cite the right celeb names and tunes; but like a rock-polishing machine, his prose gives literary sheen to fame-chasing air-kissers. He's coldly funny: when Victor's girl tries to argue him out of a break up, she angrily snorts six bumps of coke, stops, mutters, "Wrong vial," snorts four corrective doses from whatever she has in her other fist, then objects to a rival at the party wearing the same dress she's wearing.

You had to be there; Ellis makes you feel you are. But such satire is a very smart bomb targeting a very large barn. Models' status anxiety doesn't merit Ellis's Tom Wolfe-esque expertise. Glamorama gets better when Victor gets drafted into a mysterious group of model/terrorists who bomb 747s and the Ritz in Paris, wearing Kevlar-lined Armani suits. Oh, they still behave like shallow snobs, pronouncing "cool" as if it had 12 "o"s, but now when somebody swills Cristal, it's apt to be poisoned, to horrific effect, which Ellis expertly describes. His enfant-terrible debut Less Than Zero aped Joan Didion. Now Ellis has grown into a lesser Don DeLillo--and that's high praise. --Tim Appelo -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"Ellis is fast becoming a writer of real American genius." -"GQ"
"His best work to date....He remains a laser-precise satirist but the wit now dominates." -"Esquire" -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Jeanine Hildebrand am 30. August 2005
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Glamorama is a really remarkable novel in more than one way, and I enjoyed reading the other reviews, because they add to my understanding and perspective, still.

Whether you see it as a "deep study about shallowness" or find it shallow in dealing with serious problems, you might be right, depending on what you personally expect from literature.

For me, it was fun to read, it was irritating and the use of language intrigued me.

I like the the irritation of perception, and I cannot see any use in criticising the author for a book that is not written to morally "better" its readers. Thankfully this attitude has changed somewhat from the time when e.g. American Psycho was released; it must have been a horrible thing to be called a psycho killer, just because you wrote about one in 1rst person narrative.

Victor -as a representative of the "modern" lost man/boy- is basically an "immoral" ,- I am not saying that he is *bad*- character in a corresponding environment. He reacts to moral dilemmas in a reflex-kind of way: he doesn't really FEEL it.
As a consequence, everything he does, he does half-heartedly.

Someone said the book starts where American Psycho ended. I don't know if it is true, but it is an interesting point of view: Patrick Bateman is actively "evil", he kills people because he can. Victor Ward is totally passive, he is portrayed to be dumb, naïve, hostage to his superficial needs.

Things happen to him, he only adds to "the plot" through going along, being indecisive, cowardish, on drugs, etc.
Both, Bateman and Ward, show a complete lack of morals, but Victor seems to vaguely miss them. Victor is totally (he'd probably say) "gamma-ish" in his emotional development, like everybody in his world.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von David Butcher am 21. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
when you nor I nor these kings did not exist." I wonder how many people caught that. I'm not sure if Ellis did himself.
It seems that Ellis is divided between being astute chronicler and outraged moralizer. His analytical, indifferent mind and sensitive bleeding heart are in conflict. In the end, I believe he chooses to be the moralist. And that's a disappointment. Because he's well aware that what he's writing about is NOT novel. Our society is not "sliding down the surface of things" into a cess pool of sex, violence, drugs, and celebrity worship. We've always been in that cess pool from day one.
But at times, he seems to be aware of all the implications of what he writes, including the implication of his own place in all of this:
"'But Bobby I'm not...political,' I blurt out vaguely.
'Everyone is, Victor,' Bobby says, turning away again. 'It's something you can't help.'...
...'We're killing civilians,' I whisper.
'Twenty-five thousand homicides were committed in our country last year, Victor.'
'But...I didn't commit any of them, Bobby'
Bobby smiles patiently, making his way back to where I'm sitting. I look at him hopefully.
'Is it so much better to be uninvolved, Victor?'
'Yes,' I whisper. 'I think it is.'
'Everyone's involved,' he whispers back. 'That's something you need to know.'" (p.315)
Everyone's involved. And that's something you need to know. There is no high perch where we can look down upon all that we find morally repulsive and criticize it without indicting ourselves. That's the way it is. And any moralizing is just contained within it.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 21. Januar 2003
Format: Taschenbuch
Well I am actually more a "mainstream reader" but this is a real masterpiece which makes you think about your own existence and its purpose.
Follow the anti-hero Victor an almost celebrity into a crazy world of models, drugs, sex and crime and discover the real values of mankind after a long and hard struggle. But don't expect a happy end.
I first thought it strange but then I got hooked and suffered with Victor. I highly recommend this book even if you are not so much into modern literature. It's worth a try.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 30. Juli 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I just finished "Glamorama" a couple of days ago, and I'm still debating to which side of the debate raging here and elsewhere I should lean - is it utter drivel or a work of genius? There are plenty of arguments for either: yes, it often seems like a luke-warm rehash of "American Psycho" - there's the deluded, shallow, drugged-up, and possibly schizophrenic protagonist, there are the acts of unspeakable horror perpetrated by the least likely candidates, and so on. Yes, the graphic sex and violence seem completely gratuitous on occasion as they neither serve the advance of the plot nor to drive home a defined moral point, as is the case in other Ellis novels. And yes, the recurring themes (the cold, the physical numbness, the smell of sh**, the confetti, the camera crews) somehow fail to be satisfactorily resolved. And any book published this close to 2000 will bear the dreaded "millenial angst" stigma.
On the other hand, Ellis has retained his mastery of microscopic analysis and his grim sense of satire, and consequently pursues both with little regard for the subject matter at hand (and little mercy for the reader) - be it a party or a torture scene. And just as Victor might quite possibly be very deliberately deluding his environment as to his real role and personality, the narrative itself might be deliberately confusing, echoing the insanity of a society obsessed with vacuity, glamour, sex, drugs (mostly prescription, oddly enough) and violence. The message is clear - keep watching MTV, buy cool stuff, party on, but don't be surprised if you get your a** blown off in the process, baby, because the surreal is what's real...
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