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Frolic of His Own (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 10. Februar 1995

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 512 Seiten
  • Verlag: Scribner; Auflage: Reprint (10. Februar 1995)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0684800527
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684800523
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,3 x 3,8 x 20,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (19 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 391.838 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Perhaps William Gaddis' most accessible novel--though a dense and imposing book--A Frolic of His Own is a masterful work that mocks the folly of a litigious society. The story centers around Oscar Crease, the grandson of a Confederate soldier who avoided a deadly battle by invoking a legal clause that allowed him to hire a substitute and who later became a Supreme Court judge. Oscar writes a play about his grandfather that goes unproduced yet appears as the story behind a big-budget Hollywood film. Oscar sues and is tossed into the vortex of litigation. Meanwhile, almost 20 other lawsuits of varying frivolity swirl about, adding to this satirical and philosophical treat, which won the National Book Award for 1994.

Synopsis

A satirically jaundiced view of modern law and justice chronicles the fortunes of Oscar Crease, a middle-aged college instructor and playwright, as he sues a Hollywood producer for pirating a play.

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Von Ein Kunde am 27. Juli 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
I am always amused when someone posts a review implying that lawyers should not read a book because it's critical of them and they presumably wouldn't like it (see below). To the contrary, we're not all vain, ignorant barbarians. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and particularly the scathing satire directed at certain members of my chosen profession. I can assure you based upon my several years of private practice that, technical quibbles aside (who honestly cares if Gaddis didn't understand preemption?), this book is 100% dead on accurate, down to the very smallest detail, such as the covertly conniving lawyer sending the "hideous" but "expensive" potted amarylis to Christina. It is pleasurable to see my compatriots (and to a certain extent, myself) stripped of their pompous finery in such a masterful manner. It is certainly at times sobering, but meaningfully and necessarily so. And the entire book was far from a chore to read, but one of the most original, brilliantly designed novels I have ever read. It is told in a stream of consciousness style that takes some getting used to, perhaps, but is positively addictive once you get the hang of it. And the interpolation of satirical legal opinions and a deposition transcript into the novel is an original touch. Judge Crease's first "Spot" opinion is an absolute howl (no pun intended). All in all, a complex, engrossing, enriching experience.
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Von Ein Kunde am 21. Februar 1997
Format: Taschenbuch
Let me first toss the caveat that I'm already convinced that Mr. Gaddis is the best American writer of the 20th century, one who has never forsaken his style or his ambition in order to achieve mass "accessibility" (what a terrible measure of a novel's worth). Yet, if forced to rank his works in these terms, I'd say that Frolic is the second least accessible novel of his, right behind the terror which is JR (no chapter breaks, almost no authorial intrusion (i.e. help), and everything takes place in real linear time).
Frolic seems unforgiving at first, as it pours out in ranting dialogue and thick daunting legalese. But when it begins to take shape, it comes across as wonderfully imaginative without ever sounding contrived (which is why I think it resonated so much with lawyers and lovers of satire: no matter how convoluted the lawsuits become, one rarely, if ever, is struck by the notion, "Nahh, this could never happen." Because this is a very fair representation of the circus that the civil courts in this country have become.
The Dennis Miller of complex modern fiction, William Gaddis, like Joyce or Pynchon, is the kind of writer that you owe it to yourself to at least try to read. Remember, very few dug Melville in his time, while even fewer deserve to be compared to him. Gaddis is most definitely worthy of that comparison.
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Format: Taschenbuch
just to burden you with my opinion and to disagree with joshua below (done with trepidation given his impressive reading list)--this is a pretty damn fine book. for a committed gaddis-ite, 'jr' or 'the recognitions' may have been better, but i'm not sure that isn't because they're less accessible and we gaddis-ites like to shun accessibility. for the non gaddis-ite, 'a frolic of his own' should stand alone as a fine piece of work that rewards patience easily. u-who-have-not-read-this-book-yet: persevere. unlike the other gaddis books, u will get used to his style more quickly here. do not read in short bursts because you will have to relearn to read gaddis each time; read in long stretches, you learn to recognize the voices and don't need to search for who's talking (the non-verbal bits even become a little irritating). if it doesn't work out after 20-30 pages, put it aside for a year or two and come back to it (maybe after reading joyce). good luck.
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Format: Taschenbuch
This much heralded "spoof" of litigation-mad America is, in fact, a rather self-indulgent and way too long display of avant garde literary technique. A National Book Award winner should be less of a chore to get through. The book is almost all dialogue, none of it attributed, and so it is always up to the reader to retrace his steps to figure out who is talking. Gaddis can't make up his mind whether he is writing a satiric comment on modern America or a surreal pseudo-Joycean trip. A lawyer reading the book will note many technical errors (state law pre-empting federal?), but I did love the Episcopal Church/PepsiCola lawsuit about the latter being an anagram of the former. As a lawyer and Episcopalian myself, I'm mulling it over
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Format: Taschenbuch
This is a comedy? Just a cast of very few people talking to one another, not allowing anyone to finish a sentence, never having anyone finish a sentence without changing the subject, all done without quotation marks. It's hard to read and that's not necessary. Oscar is a bit mad. He and Christine are accomplished enough, and he is a classicist, but he left common sense in the pile of his unopened mail and his unpaid bills. He let his car run over himself and it's a problem whether his insurance should pay him as owner or victim. Is he suing himself? Hilarious? The ridiculous judicial opinions are funny -- indeed they make the book worth reading. And by the way, they're easier to read than the dialog.
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