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Francesca Woodman (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 1. Juni 2006


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'Since her untimely death in 1981 at the age of 23, Francesca Woodman has become something of a cult figure, inspiring a trail of young photographers and being selected for biennials and museum shows. The first monograph to document her work reproduces 250 pictures - many new discoveries - and excerpts form her journals.' (Art Review)

Synopsis

"Prodigies in photography are singularly rare; women prodigies virtually unheard of." - Abigail Solomon-Godeau. Francesca Woodman (1958-1981) has become one of the most talked about, most studied, and most influential of late twentieth century photographers. She started taking photographs when she was barely thirteen and in less than a decade created a body of work that has now secured her a reputation as one of the most original American artists of the 1970s. Woodman brought an understanding of Baroque painting, Modernist art and contemporary post-minimalist practice to her haunting, sensual images. Both in her work with models, and in sometimes disturbing self-portraits, Woodman made a thoroughgoing challenge to the certainties of photography. Interested in how people relate to space, and how the three-dimensional world can be reconciled with the two dimensions of the photographic image, Woodman played complex games of hide-and-seek with her camera. One of the enduring appeals of her work is the way in which she constructs enigmas that trap our gaze.

She depicts herself seemingly fading into a flat plane, merging with the wall under the wallpaper, dissolving into the floor, or flattening herself behind glass. But is this disappearing act really the artist putting in an appearance? That we are never completely sure what we are looking at means that we keep looking. Woodman constantly compares the fragility of her own body with the physical environment around her. Fascinated by transformation and the permeability of seemingly fixed boundaries, Woodman's work conjures the precarious moment between adolescence and adulthood, between presence and absence. This comprehensive monograph includes over 250 of Woodman's works - some of which have never been exhibited or published before - as well as extracts from her journals selected by her father George Woodman. There are examples of her large-scale blueprints and reproductions of her photobooks, including "Some Disordered Interior Geometries", which was published in 1981, the year she took her own life. An extensive text by Chris Townsend examines the influences of gothic literature, surrealism, feminism and post-minimalist art on Woodman's photographs.

Townsend places Woodman in relation to her contemporaries, such as Cindy Sherman and Richard Prince. This book confirms Woodman's position as one of America's most talented photographers and important artists since 1970, with an influence lasting well beyond her own time. Interested in how people relate to space, and how the three-dimensional world can be reconciled with the two dimensions of the photographic image, Woodman played complex games of hide-and-seek with her camera. One of the enduring appeals of her work is the way in which she constructs enigmas that trap our gaze. She depicts herself seemingly fading into a flat plane, merging with the wall under the wallpaper, dissolving into the floor, or flattening herself behind glass. But is this disappearing act really the artist putting in an appearance? That we are never completely sure what we are looking at means that we keep looking. Woodman constantly compares the fragility of her own body with the physical environment around her. Fascinated by transformation and the permeability of seemingly fixed boundaries, Woodman's work conjures the precarious moment between adolescence and adulthood, between presence and absence.


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Amazon.com: 12 Rezensionen
18 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Second printing on the way 11. Januar 2010
Von Anon e. Mous - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I wanted anyone interested in this book to know that Phaidon will soon be setting a second print run to press. Due to ongoing demand the 2nd printing will be available by late Spring/early Summer 2010. The high prices currently being sought by third parties will tumble as these books hit the market.
This book is the best of all the titles ever printed that cover her brief life. It offers reproductions of about 25% of her known vintage prints and will have to do until her Estate prints more of her negatives or authorizes a catalogue raisonné, which would cost a small fortune.

Additional news: I knew Francesca quite well during the last 6 months of her short life and saw the film "The Woodmans" a few months back with the expectation that some personal questions might have been answered in the course of the movie. Unfortunately, they weren't. Anyone who would like more specifics on her life should make an effort to see the film but be warned that it's not a simple, pretty picture of a loving family...
If you'd like to watch the trailer, visit the movie's website.
23 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Art Criticism - what is it good for? 19. März 2007
Von Fraelen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I, personally, like Francesca Woodman's photographs and they are well represented in this book. It's a lovely, big, heavy, think-paged, glossy, pretty book with a giant gold F and W on the front and back cover (under the paper sleeve). I found the commentary at the back by her father and Betsy Berne to be informative, interesting, and helpful and enjoyed looking over the selection of her journal entries they included. It makes it much easier to read her writing when you know that she self-consciously chose an affected style. Actually, I thought Betsy Bernes' three page letter was better written than most of the book and certainly more believable. But I do have a tendency to raise a questioning eye-brow at a lot of the sorts of things that art critics seem to find so very important, obvious, or interesting. For instance, I've never really been on board with this whole obsession of turning every object or juxtaposition into a metaphor for the camera. It's practically Freudian, the connections are so stretched sometimes. Yes, I actually read the 70 page essay on her work and, to give it credit, it was thorough and pretty well organized with lots of examples in the margins of her contemporaries' work and that of her influences. I did learn a lot about her life and the context in which she grew up and made her art and about how very much she may have intended to say with each piece. But I do say 'may have' quite purposefully. Read the text with a grain of salt and you can get a lot out of this book. And, of course, the pictures make it worth it.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Quintessential photo book on Woodman 29. September 2008
Von HelloPhotokitty "Kathy" - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I have over 100 books on photographers and photography, but this one is my most treasured. The images are exquisitely reproduced, and arranged in such a thoughtful manner, and the accompanying text/outline/stories add a human element to the tragic story of such a brilliant and gifted photographer.
17 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Interesting 9. November 2006
Von Jessica - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I really love this book it's so nice to finally have a book of Francesca Woodmans work I can actually afford. Francesca Woodman was a prodigy genius and her pictures go way beyond photography she did something very special. I wish though that they published more work that I haven't seen if there are 800 pictures why do they keep reproducing the same ones? Also seeing her journal entries inside the book was amazing that would be a book right there her journals. Overall the book is beautiful the pictures are printed in very good quality.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The Inner Eye of a Genius, Shared 16. März 2012
Von Grady Harp - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Francesca Woodman (1958 - 1981) is one of those artists whose potential was never realized fully - she died, the result of suicide, in 1981 at the age of 22. But the images she created with the camera continue to haunt the viewer and this portfolio puts it all together very well. Woodman's small photographs deal with the feminine mystique, an acceptable way of describing the strange poses she created with women models - including herself. There is a flavor here of surrealism (especially in the image of a seated girl with a handing mirage of a feminine body nearby).

It is difficult to grasp the degree of creativity necessary to create some 800 images in the course of the nine years during which she embraced her art. These images are not suggestive of Dorothea Lange or Diane Arbus, but they tend to have the same sort of response from the viewer - intense reality that becomes surreal in the context in which the statement is made. Her language is definitely her own, a mixture of dark motifs, sinister atmospheres, the use of 'sets' that are well worn interiors with the accompanying used and abused accouterments, and a sense of alienation, likely not dissimilar form the fragile mind state at her demise.

The stunning manner in which she approached her subjects, unaffected by what is considered 'correct' or contrived, is one of the aspects that makes hre work so indelible on the mind after view the images but once. Grady Harp, March 12
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