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The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing: Morningstar's Guide to Building Wealth and Winning in the Market
 
 

The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing: Morningstar's Guide to Building Wealth and Winning in the Market [Kindle Edition]

Pat Dorsey , Joe Mansueto

Kindle-Preis: EUR 12,69 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Taschenbuch EUR 15,90  
MP3 CD, Audiobook EUR 11,99  


Produktbeschreibungen

Rezension

Not long ago, MagicDiligence reviewed Mary Buffett and David Clark's Warren Buffett and the Interpretation of Financial Statem...... and concluded that, while possibly useful for beginners, experienced stock investors would dismiss the book as simplistic and adding nothing new. The review also mentioned that a good alternative for more experienced investors looking to add to their knowledge is Pat Dorsey's The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing.

Today we'll take a look at that book. The author, Pat Dorsey, is currently the Director of Equity Research for Morningstar. Morningstar has historically been known for their 5-star scale of mutual fund ratings, but several years ago began applying the same scale to individual stocks. Since Morningstar's focus is on durable competitive advantage, the firm's investing philosophy correlates very well with that of the Magic Formula and of MagicDiligence. That makes the book particularly relevant and much of my stock analysis is based on techniques outlined in it. The Five Rules... is more or less a two part book. The first half deals covers the title, laying out the five rules for successful investing and then proceeding to expand on each of them. Without spoiling too much of the book, Dorsey's five rules are:

1) Do your homework.

2) Find economic moats.

3) Have a margin of safety.

4) Hold for the long haul.

5) Know when to sell.

This first section then continues on to introduce the investor to the techniques of stock analysis. Topics covered include detailed explanations of each financial statement, the points of emphasis to look for in a good investment (such as growth potential and financial health), how to spot accounting blowups before they happen, how to value a stock, and so forth. For everyone interested in stock analysis, from 10 year pros to those just beginning to dip their toes in the market, these chapters contain invaluable and vital information. Nearly every investor will learn something new about evaluating companies and valuing stocks. One particularly valuable chapter is titled "The 10-Minute Test", which will help you quickly throw out stocks that are not worth your time, while highlighting investment opportunities that warrant additional research.

The second half of the book is equally useful. In this section, Dorsey calls upon Morningstar's sector analysts to lay out the intrinsic moat qualities and the factors that separate good and bad companies in a variety of sectors, including Health Care, Consumer Services, Media, Banks, and so on. It's no secret to MagicDiligence Members that some industries are inherently better investment hunting grounds than others, and this book explains why. For example, retail is generally a difficult place to invest - there are no customer switching costs, tons of competition, and constantly changing consumer trends. On the other hand, most medical device makers have very high switching costs, as surgeons are trained on one company's products and are loathe to learn the intricacies of a competing product, unless there is a very good reason to do so.

To close this review, a personal observation. Most investors routinely cite classic investing books like Ben Graham's The Intelligent Investor as the place to start for novice investors. I respectfully disagree. I've read many of those great classics, but no one book has explained the details of company and equity analysis as directly or relevantly as this book. This is one of the most overlooked investing books out there, and comes highly recommended to all investors. -The Motley Fool

Rezension

Not long ago, MagicDiligence reviewed Mary Buffett and David Clark′s Warren Buffett and the Interpretation of Financial Statem...... and concluded that, while possibly useful for beginners, experienced stock investors would dismiss the book as simplistic and adding nothing new. The review also mentioned that a good alternative for more experienced investors looking to add to their knowledge is Pat Dorsey′s The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing. Today we′ll take a look at that book. The author, Pat Dorsey, is currently the Director of Equity Research for Morningstar. Morningstar has historically been known for their 5–star scale of mutual fund ratings, but several years ago began applying the same scale to individual stocks. Since Morningstar′s focus is on durable competitive advantage, the firm′s investing philosophy correlates very well with that of the Magic Formula and of MagicDiligence. That makes the book particularly relevant and much of my stock analysis is based on techniques outlined in it. The Five Rules... is more or less a two part book. The first half deals covers the title, laying out the five rules for successful investing and then proceeding to expand on each of them. Without spoiling too much of the book, Dorsey′s five rules are: 1) Do your homework. 2) Find economic moats. 3) Have a margin of safety. 4) Hold for the long haul. 5) Know when to sell. This first section then continues on to introduce the investor to the techniques of stock analysis. Topics covered include detailed explanations of each financial statement, the points of emphasis to look for in a good investment (such as growth potential and financial health), how to spot accounting blowups before they happen, how to value a stock, and so forth. For everyone interested in stock analysis, from 10 year pros to those just beginning to dip their toes in the market, these chapters contain invaluable and vital information. Nearly every investor will learn something new about evaluating companies and valuing stocks. One particularly valuable chapter is titled "The 10–Minute Test", which will help you quickly throw out stocks that are not worth your time, while highlighting investment opportunities that warrant additional research. The second half of the book is equally useful. In this section, Dorsey calls upon Morningstar′s sector analysts to lay out the intrinsic moat qualities and the factors that separate good and bad companies in a variety of sectors, including Health Care, Consumer Services, Media, Banks, and so on. It′s no secret to MagicDiligence Members that some industries are inherently better investment hunting grounds than others, and this book explains why. For example, retail is generally a difficult place to invest – there are no customer switching costs, tons of competition, and constantly changing consumer trends. On the other hand, most medical device makers have very high switching costs, as surgeons are trained on one company′s products and are loathe to learn the intricacies of a competing product, unless there is a very good reason to do so. To close this review, a personal observation. Most investors routinely cite classic investing books like Ben Graham′s The Intelligent Investor as the place to start for novice investors. I respectfully disagree. I′ve read many of those great classics, but no one book has explained the details of company and equity analysis as directly or relevantly as this book. This is one of the most overlooked investing books out there, and comes highly recommended to all investors. –The Motley Fool

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1738 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 384 Seiten
  • Verlag: Wiley; Auflage: 1 (21. April 2008)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B000SEIYBK
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #114.000 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 4.5 von 5 Sternen  72 Rezensionen
71 von 72 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Accessible, solid, grown-up 25. Juli 2004
Von FreeAtLast - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I retired at 51 on my investments and have spent much of my time trying to counterbalance the instant-gratification claims of so many of those selling seminars and "help" to the investor.

While few people would be so foolish as to pay $40,000 for a Honda Civic despite that car's solid engineering, many will buy a stock with no concept of what its fair-market value may be. Of this number, some are subscribers to the Greater Fool School of investing. They'll happily overpay for a popular stock in the arrogant belief that they'll be able to unload it for a profit to some Greater Fool. Sometimes, they will indeed make a profit. (At other times, they'll make an excuse.) This book is not for them.

The rest overpay not because they subscribe to the Greater Fool school but because they simply have no idea of how to value a stock. THAT is where this book shines. It will make the investor more conscious of what a stock is worth -- thereby avoiding the payment of $40,000 for a Honda or (in some cases) the payment of $100,000 for a Yugo!

Will the identification of value stocks and the discipline of not overpaying for a stock guarantee a profit? On any given purchase, of course not. However, it is a fool's task to argue that conscious investing based upon some sense of a company's true value will not reward more of its practitioners than Greater Fool speculations will over time.

If you're a serious investor with at least the discipline and patience than you demand of your own children, following this book's counsel should help you to make more money with greater safety. It's more accessible than The Intelligent Investor and a must read both for the novice and for the experienced investor who would like to pick up some distinctions that will improve his or her performance.
88 von 93 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen For Value Investors. Fantastic Guide to Evaluating Companies & Stock Prices. 28. Februar 2006
Von mirasreviews - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
"The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing" is a guide to value investing by Morningstar's Director of Stock Analysis Pat Dorsey and the folks at Morningstar, Inc. The book's goal is to educate investors in how to "find wonderful businesses and purchase them at reasonable prices." Its title is a little misleading in that the "Five Rules" are a small part of this book. The five principles to which the title refers are: 1. Do your homework, 2. Find companies with strong competitive advantages (or economic moats), 3. Have a margin of safety, 4. Hold for the long term, 5. Know when to sell. Those are vague principles, but most of this book is dedicated to telling you just what homework you need to do and exactly how to do it. Pat Dorsey and Morningstar are advocates of long-term investing who are skeptical of trading and portfolio churning, so this book's intended audience is value investors. No technical analysis here. This is all fundamental analysis, but traders may find the advice on analyzing company finances useful as well.

"The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing" has 2 parts: Chapters 1-12 are a "how-to" for analyzing companies, their finances, and determining what their stock should be worth. Key points include how to evaluate a company's competitive advantages, what to look for in financial statements, analyzing a company's management, spotting financial chicanery, and how to determine a company's intrinsic value. This is all fairly complex, and there is math involved, but the book takes you through the process, with examples, explaining why and how every step of the way. Chapters 13-26 provide overviews of 13 industries, from banks to software to industrial materials, including information on what the industries do, how they make money, hallmarks of successful companies, and risks to look out for. Each of these chapters concludes with an "Investor's Checklist" for that sector to help you identify key factors when choosing a stock. "The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing" is among the best books I've seen for learning how to pick apart financial statements, and it packs a great deal of advice on evaluating companies within their sectors into one concise and readable volume. Highly recommended to value investors.
40 von 42 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen silly title, great book 7. Oktober 2005
Von Jeff Lipkes - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
Have been meaning to put in a good word for this book for a long time. It's a gem. I've read an embarrassingly large number of introductions to investing in equities and this is probably the best. Other books purport to tell you how to identify hot stocks; Dorsey shows how to value companies. This isn't just a matter of understanding PE ratios and other traditional metrics, which most books explain more or less adequately. Instead, it means analyzing balance sheets and cash flow and income statements. _Five Rules_ provides as reader-friendly an introduction to assessing a company's financial statements as I've come across, with plenty of real-world examples. The object in the end is to determine the present value of a company's future cash flows, and Dorsey's explanation of a simplified version of Fisher's and William's discounted cash flow model is lucid and lively. Clorox is the company evaluated in this chapter, and en route there are instructive comparisons of HP and Dell, Best Buy and Circuit City, and, finally, AMD and Biomet. Chapter 8, Avoiding Financial Fakery, is particularly helpful. Obviously, having read this book and nothing else, you're not going to be able to spot something fishy in the footnotes to Microsoft's income statement that has escaped the attention of all the analysts. But for someone without a background in accounting, _Five Rules_ is a godsend.

Dorsey then conducts a very informative tour d'horizon of 13 industries. It should go without saying that before you invest in a company, you'd want to find out something about the economics of its industry, so you can compare apples with apples. The chapter on health care is especially good, but I found them all excellent.

In an Ameritrade ad that aired this week, a teenager asks her dad for $80 for a pair of jeans. The dad is nonplused, but the girl assures him that everyone is buying these jeans. He asks her who the manufacturer is, promptly logs onto Ameritrade, checks a chart, and buys the company's stock. The guy then gives his daughter the $80, a reward for the hot tip, presumably. He might do OK this time, but you have to figure he'd be a lot better off in the long run investing a fraction of that $80 in _Five Rules_.

Bottom line: there are a ton of books on trading strategies, but if you're looking for a practical book on value investing, this is the best.
24 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Handles an intimidating subject artfully 17. Juni 2004
Von timjk - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
There are many books on financial statement analysis, and I've bought most of them...being a liberal arts major who is working toward an MBA in Finance, I've found mastering ratios and concepts related to reading company annual reports frustrating and challeging: my brain seemed not to be wired to be competent in this subject matter. However, I find Pat Dorsey's treatment effective in that he uses the concepts in a less intimidating context than other books might, without watering down the content. Can someone read this book and decipher GE's annual statement to the last footnote? Not hardly. It is often said that it's knowing the essential 20% of a subject that is responsible for 80% of one's success, and this book fills this role in understanding that 20%. Further, the chapters breaking out how to modify analyis of different sectors and industries in the market is also helpful to avoid comparing apples to oranges when evaluating stocks and companies. Beyond this book, the next step up from this would be "Analysis for Financial Management" by Higgins.
20 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Insightful! 29. Juni 2004
Von Rolf Dobelli - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The best investing principles, as clearly reiterated here, are stable and evergreen. As an investor, you'll welcome author Pat Dorsey's unambiguous, straightforward presentation of the always valid wisdom of the markets. This conveniently organized book offers several chapters of general relevance to investors in all markets and industries, including an industry-by-industry examination of the determinants of value. The title is cute, but the content isn't about the title's rules - it is about learning and obeying the basics of stock investing. We recommend the author's long term perspective. Many of the directions he sets for potential investments could still be valid years hence.
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&quote;
Next, divide free cash flow by sales (or revenues), which tells you what proportion of each dollar in revenue the firm is able to convert into excess profits. If a firms free cash flow as a percentage of sales is around 5 percent or better, youve found a cash machineas of mid-2003, only one-half of the S&P 500 pass this test. Strong free cash flow is an excellent sign that a firm has an economic moat. &quote;
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&quote;
In general, firms that can post net margins above 15 percent are doing something right. &quote;
Markiert von 102 Kindle-Nutzern
&quote;
If operating cash flows stagnate or shrink even as earnings grow, its likely that something is rotten. &quote;
Markiert von 99 Kindle-Nutzern

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