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Feynman Lectures On Computation [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Richard P. Feynman , Anthony Hey
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Kurzbeschreibung

7. Juli 2000
When, in 1984–86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman, the course also featured, as occasional guest speakers, some of the most brilliant men in science at that time, including Marvin Minsky, Charles Bennett, and John Hopfield. Although the lectures are now thirteen years old, most of the material is timeless and presents a “Feynmanesque” overview of many standard and some not-so-standard topics in computer science such as reversible logic gates and quantum computers.

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 318 Seiten
  • Verlag: Westview Press; Auflage: Revised. (7. Juli 2000)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0738202967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738202969
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 2 x 15,3 x 23,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 40.217 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Synopsis

When, in 198486, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman, the course also featured, as occasional guest speakers, some of the most brilliant men in science at that time, including Marvin Minsky, Charles Bennett, and John Hopfield. Although the lectures are now thirteen years old, most of the material is timeless and presents a Feynmanesque overview of many standard and some not-so-standard topics in computer science such as reversible logic gates and quantum computers.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Richard P. Feynman was raised in Far Rockaway, New York, and received his Ph.D. from Princeton. He held professorships at both Cornell and the California Institute of Technology. In 1965 he received the Nobel Prize for his work on quantum electrodynamics. He died in 1988.

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4.0 von 5 Sternen ...It's R.P Feynman...what more can I say. 4. März 1998
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The Feynman lectures on Computation (volume 1) takes into account an all-encompassing view of the underlying theories of computer science and electrical engineering as it relates to computer systems development. Volume 1 sets a solid foundation for advanced topics in the field and I would highly reccommend the book for any freshmen EE or CS student wishing to see what the next few years have in store for them. Being a computer systems engineer, I can't wait until volume 2 is released.
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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Part showmanship, part genius 1. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This is the description given by Time magazine to Feynman's investigation on the cause of the Challenger disaster. And like other books by/about him, this one reinforces the statement. Recommended for physics and computer engineering graduates who want an overview of computer science using the tools of physics. Don't miss out on this smorgasbord of ideas and good stories!
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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Feynman explains the fundamentals of computers--both themathematics and the physics at the heart of computing. He gives theappropriate amount of detail, enough to explain his points, but not so much that the reader gets bogged down. He also makes few assumptions about the reader's prior knowledge, so that anyone with a scientific or mathematical background can easily understand.
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1 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Disappointing 19. Februar 2004
Format:Taschenbuch
We physicists want a readable book on computability, degrees of computational complexity, and the like. Feynman would have been the writer to provide us with that. We're fortunate to have anything at all of what Feynman thought about the subject, but this book (taken from Feynman's rough lecture notes) does not do the job. E.g., in the first chapter we're presented with a description of RPF's joy in discovery and corresponding philosophy of how to understand anything: don't read about it, just work it out by yourself in umpteen different ways (nothing new about Feynman there!), but the examples provided of how Feynman actullally worked it out can be compared with some of Arnol'd's presentations of how he worked out mechanics problems in his text on Classical Mechanics (state the problem, then state the final result). So we still need a SYSTEMATIC 'written-for physicists' text on computability. Neverthless, we can be grateful to Hey and Allen for putting together these stimulating Feynman fragments for us, especially since they stim from his last days of life as a physicist.
By the way, Feynman certainly would not have agreed with S. Weinberg's extreme reductionist philisophy that asserts that once we've understood quantum theory and quarks then we've understood physics/nature, that 'the rest is mere detail'. On the other hand, he surely would have horselaughed the holists who proclaim that reductionism is dead, that physics will become more like 'poetry'. The lie in the latter nonsense is exposed by the entire field of genetics and cell biology, which is where the 'real' complexity in nature is to be found. Every physics student should be required to take a good class in molecular biolgy these days, a subject that's a lot more important and a lot more interesting than string theory (which, as Feynman more or less said, has degenerated into mere philosophy in the absence of experiments to test the ideas) .
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Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  14 Rezensionen
43 von 46 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Computers a la Feynman 26. November 2000
Von Howard Schneider - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This reference is derived from Feynman's lectures at Caltech between 1983-1986 for the course 'Potentialities and Limitations of Computing Machines'. This small volume introduces computers as a file clerk performing his tasks, moves on to show how the 'file clerk' can be built out of simple gates, how the gates can be built out actual transistors, discusses essential issues in computation theory such as computability and Turing machines, and then discusses essential issues in information theory such as data compression. The physics of computing from a thermodynamics context is then considered. If the general reader ignores the gas equations, this chapter is fairly easy to read and enlightening. The next chapter continues with a discussion of quantum mechanical computers. The final chapter discusses how real transistors function at the atomic level and fabrication techniques for real integrated circuits. Lectures given by invited experts on computer science topics such as vision, robots, expert systems, etc, are not included. Although this reference does not discuss alternative architectures for computation, such as the ones found in the brains of animals, this reference is ideal to introduce the motivated general reader to the concept of computation and the techniques used in commercial computers.
23 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I like this book 9. November 2004
Von Jill Malter - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Yes, I think you can teach the theory of computation from this book. And you can learn it from this book. Some of the material isn't all that recent, but much of it doesn't need to be.

35 years ago, if one were teaching a course on the theory of computation, I'd have recommended Minsky's book (it came out in 1967). That was a great text. Nowadays, there are numerous choices. But one could still use books that originally came out well before Feynman's notes, such as Lewis & Papadimitriou or Hopcroft, Motwani, and Ullman.

The question boils down to the quality of what is in the book, as well as what material it has that other books do not, and what material it is missing that most other texts have.

This book is quite readable and preserves much of Feynman's teaching style. So let's look at what it is missing. First, it doesn't talk much about real neurons. Of course, even Minsky doesn't dwell much on that, and other computation books avoid that topic too. But now, there's a more serious omission. Feynman spends something like two pages on grammars! If you were using Lewis and Papadimitriou (first edition) there would be a chapter of over 70 pages on context-free languages alone. As a teacher or a student, would you really want to miss all that?

No, as a student, you would have to read up on all that material elsewhere. And as a teacher, you would have to use another book or write your own notes. That material is too much a part of most required curricula.

But that doesn't take away from the value of the book when it comes to the rest of the material. And the final four chapters, which discuss coding and information theory, reversible computation and the thermodynamics of computing, quantum mechanical computers, and some physical aspects of computation, are all useful material that you often won't see in other computation texts.

As a student, I'd read the book. As a teacher, I'd recommend it to my students. But as either, I wouldn't expect to use it as the only textbook.
14 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Mostly brilliant 9. Mai 2006
Von wiredweird - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Of course, 'brilliant' is what you'd expect from Feynman. These lectures, originally presented in 1983-6, capture a number of the most fundamental, esoteric concepts in computing. Since Feynman is doing the explaining, however, the ideas come across clear and strong.

Chapter 3, on the basic theory of computation, introduces not only the Turing machine, but also the basic idea of what things can and can not possibly be computed and why. He also explains the "universal" machine, and the meaning of universality that mathematically steps up from any one machine to all machines. The next chapters discuss coding theory. That has body of knowledge has since become pervasive in our every-day lives, even if it's never visible. After that two chapters present the physical limits to computation, and how computation can approach those limits using quantum mechanics.

This includes the superfically odd idea of reversible computation. I say odd because, for example, knowing that two numbers add up to six doesn't tell you whether the two were five and one, zero and six, or some other combination. You normally can't run addition backwards from the sum to the summands, so standard addition is said to be irreversible. Reversibility gives amazing properties to a system, however, and things like the Toffoli gates show how it can be implemented.

The only disappointments in this book come from the very beginning and very end. The beginning describes what a computer is, as if the reader had never heard of computers before. I guess that basic level is still needed, but is no longer needed at the college level. The very end describes silicon technology, as it was known in the early 1980s. Despite some fascinating bits of device physics and some heavy editing, that discussion has aged with the rapidity you'd expect from Moore's law. And in a few places, the older discussions of biological systems have aged poorly.

Still, his explorations of the physical limits to computation as just as fresh and salient as ever. I recommend this to anyone with a beginner's interest in the foundations of coding, computing, and quantum computation.

//wiredweird
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen ...It's R.P Feynman...what more can I say. 4. März 1998
Von crayner@nexen.com - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The Feynman lectures on Computation (volume 1) takes into account an all-encompassing view of the underlying theories of computer science and electrical engineering as it relates to computer systems development. Volume 1 sets a solid foundation for advanced topics in the field and I would highly reccommend the book for any freshmen EE or CS student wishing to see what the next few years have in store for them. Being a computer systems engineer, I can't wait until volume 2 is released.
13 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Dissapointing 28. November 2003
Von galaxy_express_899 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I find this book dissapointing. It doesn't compare with the insight, clarity, and beauty found in the famous "Feynman lectures in physics". Basically what Feynman does in this book is simplify and coaches one though complex Computer Science/ Information Theory Concepts. The book may have the small size of a novel, but I find it to be more like a textbook; because it has many equations (even exercises in the first chapter), and also one has to be quite attentive while reading. I'm not saying this is a bad book, only that, if you liked the "Feynman lectures in physics" it doesn't automatically mean you'll like this book. This book is different, obviously in the sense that it doesn't deal much with physics, and secondly in the fact that it is not passionatly written, I think. Why is this book so expensive anyways?
Now that you got my warning. I can definitely recomend this book for people intereseted in things like:
-theoretical limits of computers (enthropy, energy)
-physical realizations of logic gates (transistors)
-quantum computers
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