oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 1,00 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Den Verlag informieren!
Ich möchte dieses Buch auf dem Kindle lesen.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Feel Like Going Home: Portraits in Blues and Rock 'n' Roll [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Peter Guralnick
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
Preis: EUR 12,90 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Dienstag, 23. September: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch EUR 12,90  
Unbekannter Einband --  

Kurzbeschreibung

1. Juli 1999
This vivid celebration of blues and early rock 'n' roll includes some of the first and most illuminating profiles of such blues masters as Muddy Waters, Skip James, and Howlin' Wolf; excursions into the blues-based Memphis rock 'n' roll of Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Rich, and the Sun record label; and a brilliant depiction of the bustling Chicago blues scene and the legendary Chess record label in its final days. With unique insight and unparalleled access, Peter Guralnick brings to life the people, the songs, and the performance that forever changed not only the American music scene but America itself.

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Feel Like Going Home: Portraits in Blues and Rock 'n' Roll + Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom
Preis für beide: EUR 25,86

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 272 Seiten
  • Verlag: Back Bay Books; Auflage: Back Bay Pbk. (1. Juli 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0316332720
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316332729
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23,5 x 15,8 x 1,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 272.925 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Peter Guralnick pledges in the epilogue to Feel Like Going Home that his writing will henceforth be "younger, less self-conscious and critical." Don't dwell too much on the author's oath, however: the prose here is hardly jaded and awkward. Initially published in 1971, Feel Like Going Home consists of 11 chapters, most of which are single-subject studies of American roots-music artists. Guralnick openly reveres his interview subjects, which isn't to imply that he fawns over them. The likes of bluesmen Howlin' Wolf and Johnny Shines, incorrigible rock & roller Jerry Lee Lewis, and, in particular, moody man-without-a-genre talent Charlie Rich (who was inspired to write a song called "Feel Like Going Home" based on this book--it's the final song on his final album) come across as knotty, vivid, complex characters. Published in tandem with Guralnick's similarly organized Lost Highway and his superb history of southern soul, Sweet Soul Music, Feel Like Going Home provides an early-stage perspective on a music historian who's truly arrived. --Steven Stolder

Synopsis

IN

Eine digitale Version dieses Buchs im Kindle-Shop verkaufen

Wenn Sie ein Verleger oder Autor sind und die digitalen Rechte an einem Buch haben, können Sie die digitale Version des Buchs in unserem Kindle-Shop verkaufen. Weitere Informationen

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
5.0 von 5 Sternen
5.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Wonderful Portraits of Musical Giants 15. Februar 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick begins this book with a tribute to early rock and roll and his adoration of it and then has chapters on mainly blues performers and then Sun Records and finally the final days of Chess Records. Guralnick gives us personal insights on artists, some famous (Jerry Lee Lewis), some more obscure (Robert Pete Williams). Even if you have read every item of information on Howlin Wolf or Charlie Rich this still displays a perspective on them from a different angle. Overall a wonderful glimpse into the world of the performers from a human level.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick writes so beautifully about blues, treating it with the seriousness it deserves without making it carry more than it can bear. His writing is so understated and his insights so subtle that you find yourself thinking about his profiles of these artists as you listen to them later. He brings enough scholarly bearing to them to make you realize that what makes blues so special are the things it has in common with all great art--beauty and depth of feeling.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick writes so beautifully about blues, treating it with the seriousness it deserves without making it carry more than it can bear. His writing is so understated and his insights so subtle that you find yourself thinking about his profiles of these artists as you listen to them later. He brings enough scholarly bearing to them to make you realize that what makes blues so special are the things it has in common with all great art--beauty and depth of feeling.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  10 Rezensionen
13 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Engaging Portraits Of Music Pioneers 13. April 2004
Von Bill Slocum - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
As someone who doesn't know a lot about blues music except to run and hide when someone begins to comment on "the cadential modalities of Muddy Waters's early Chess period" over cocktails, I approached this book with trepidation, unnecessarily. It's a very enveloping and informative look at some of the compelling personalities who helped shape two key forms of American popular music, the blues and rock 'n' roll.

It's not a comprehensive history; Guralnick instead offers some individual, detailed portraits. You can understand him choosing Waters, Howlin' Wolf, and Jerry Lee Lewis, because they were all giant figures in the creation of these genres. But other choices are more idiosyncratic, like Johnny Shines, described as "a run-of-the-mill blues singer" by the co-founder of landmark label Chess Records; and Robert Pete Williams, who seems to merge blues with free associative verse and would never be more than a footnote character in most histories. And what's with including Charlie Rich, who had a brief association with rock's founding via Sun Records but never really established himself as either a blues or rock performer?

Guralnick never does tie any of this in; his pieces, however intended to cohere, feel like collected articles written for music magazines. I don't know that they have to be read in order and one after the other, like chapters of a book.

But individually they are good, in most cases very good. Guralnick is an unusual departure from rock writers. He writes with singular care; with craft, honesty, and an engaging sense of humility that draws the reader in. He doesn't make broad claims for anyone's greatness, or dismiss others out of hand. He takes himself out of the picture, and makes it feel like you are the one in the room listening to Shines talking about traveling moonlit country roads with Robert Johnson, looking for a barrelhouse or gin joint to make a few bucks in.

Or Williams, sitting in his country home alongside a dirt road, portraits of the Kennedys and Martin Luther King over his head, drinking away the afternoon and wondering if his inability to pick out a tune at times is because maybe "blues is evil."

"God is warning me, I've got to get myself straight," Williams tells Guralnick. "And yet still and all I don't know, something hits me and I feel peculiar, I might be riding along, say now you get in your car and ride, well the ideas just come to me out of the air. Why is that? What made me think of that?"

Traditional blues music was in trouble by the time of this book's publication, in 1971. Guralnick visits Chess Records and finds a record company about to collapse. It's perhaps symbolic that when Guralnick introduces us to Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf, both men are laid up sick in bed. Perhaps an earlier look would have offers a more vibrant take. But Guralnick gets the most out of what he finds.

The best essays are on Wolf, who relishes comments about his "gargantuan" onstage theatricality but exposes a thin skin on other fronts; and Rich, who seems so out-of-water here except for the engaging candor from him and his wife. Rich's drinking problems and lonely sadness are the main focus of his essay, yet Rich not only cooperated with the author, he ended up inspired enough by it to write a song using the book's title. It's the best essay in that you feel for the guy; then again, they're all like that.

I don't know that much more about Skip James or Muddy Waters from reading this book, but I know enough now not to duck off in the other direction when I hear their names spoken of. Good music, like all things in life, knows no boundaries.
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A beautiful book by one of popular music's best critics. 19. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick writes so beautifully about blues, treating it with the seriousness it deserves without making it carry more than it can bear. His writing is so understated and his insights so subtle that you find yourself thinking about his profiles of these artists as you listen to them later. He brings enough scholarly bearing to them to make you realize that what makes blues so special are the things it has in common with all great art--beauty and depth of feeling.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Wonderful Portraits of Musical Giants 15. Februar 2000
Von Jason Lubrant - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick begins this book with a tribute to early rock and roll and his adoration of it and then has chapters on mainly blues performers and then Sun Records and finally the final days of Chess Records. Guralnick gives us personal insights on artists, some famous (Jerry Lee Lewis), some more obscure (Robert Pete Williams). Even if you have read every item of information on Howlin Wolf or Charlie Rich this still displays a perspective on them from a different angle. Overall a wonderful glimpse into the world of the performers from a human level.
8 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Great within its limits 15. August 2000
Von Howard Sauertieg - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Guralnick's classic book has great persuasive power, particularly among young or less knowledgeable readers, for Guralnick writes from the heart and pulls the reader along with sheer enthusiasm for the subject matter. The book is most valuable for its chapters on some characters who aren't often written about in depth - Johnny Shines, Skip James, Robert Pete Williams. Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf also get their own chapters, but they're already popular and Guralnick probably isn't going to introduce too many readers to these monoliths. It's fun to read about music and performers we like - that is the key to this book's success, I think.
Where it falls short is in the area of hard fact and objective analysis. There are no footnotes, and Guralnick's prejudices result in some bizarre and some blatantly wrong statements. For example, Guralnick asserts that, as of 1971, the Rolling Stones were the one major rock and roll band who always played rock and roll music, while the Beatles never really did that (p. 35) -- a statement ripe with Stones media hype of the Sticky Fingers era. Granted, the Beatles were more influenced by "rockabilly" and less Chicago-blues-based than the Stones, but they easily fall within the parameters of Guralnick's what-is-rock-and-roll thesis. In fact, Guralnick is eager to show how contemporary rock music -- even the bulk of the Beatles' music -- owes much of its content and structure to The Blues, whether the musicians know it or not. Guralnick also insists that the Beatles never paid tribute to, or publicized, their musical influences, while the Stones recorded songs by their favorite bluesmen and appeared onstage with them. Again, Guralnick overlooks Beatles for Sale (half cover versions) and Please Please Me and With the Beatles... and the fact that the Beatles were prolific songwriters, while the early Stones recorded cover versions for lack of good original material.
The crux of the issue, unstated by Guralnick but implicit in his comparisons, is that the Beatles did not try to sound Black, and thus failed to meet his subjective standard of what "rock and roll" should be. This prejudice hampers Guralnick's central argument -- that nearly all pop music derives from The Blues -- by suggesting that blues-based music is more rare and less popular than we think. The book's thesis would be improved if Guralnick were to broaden his survey to include jazz music & its blues origins, then the influence of jazz on popular music (e.g., Frank Sinatra) and so on. Then we'd see how Mel Torme and the Beatles and Ella Fitzgerald can all fit together in that big bed we call "the blues."
The book doesn't pretend to be a scholarly study of blues & rock and roll, however. It's more like a series of magazine pieces, to be read on planes, trains and busses. It's a fine introduction to the 50s roots of modern "rock" music.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Feel Like Going Home 14. Mai 2012
Von Tammany Hall - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Guralnick has referred to his trilogy of American roots music (Feel Like Going Home, Lost Highway and Sweet Soul Music) as an effort to detail his love for blues, rockabilly/country, and soul music. Like Lost Highway, Feel Like Going Home mixes profiles of blues and rockabilly/country musicians, though the emphasis is plainly on blues and blues musicians. It is less cohesive than the others, particularly Sweet Soul Music, but is a great introduction to Guralnick as biographer and critic. Guralnick applies his relaxed writing style to his love of rock n' roll, which began in his youth, and his love of the blues, which began in college. The reader really gets a sense of what drew Guralnick to the music, which is often difficult for critics to convey. He profiles musicians like Howlin Wolf, Johnny Shines and Jerry Lee Lewis with aplomb, but by far the best portions deal with Charlie Rich. Like Guralnick's tastes, Rich is a somewhat genre-blurring; he scored early hits as a rockabilly singer, shifted towards a bluesier feel, but is best known as a countrypolitan crooner. As he does in his other books, Gurlanick provides a fairly up-to-date discography for the artists covered in the book, and his recommendations are spot-on. As a stylist, he avoids the over-the-top gonzo style of Nick Tosches and the desperate graps for historical relevance of Greil Marcus to accurately portray the lives of musicians and the strength of music as entertainment and art.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar