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Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 22. Oktober 1999


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 224 Seiten
  • Verlag: Addison-Wesley Longman, Amsterdam; Auflage: US ed (22. Oktober 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0201616416
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201616415
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 18,6 x 1,1 x 23,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.9 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (56 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 84.510 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Kent Beck's eXtreme Programming eXplained provides an intriguing high-level overview of the author's Extreme Programming (XP) software development methodology. Written for IS managers, project leaders, or programmers, this guide provides a glimpse at the principles behind XP and its potential advantages for small- to mid-size software development teams.

The book intends to describe what XP is, its guiding principles, and how it works. Simply written, the book avoids case studies and concrete details in demonstrating the efficacy of XP. Instead, it demonstrates how XP relies on simplicity, unit testing, programming in pairs, communal ownership of code, and customer input on software to motivate code improvement during the development process. As the author notes, these principles are not new, but when they're combined their synergy fosters a new and arguably better way to build and maintain software. Throughout the book, the author presents and explains these principles, such as "rapid feedback" and "play to win," which form the basis of XP.

Generally speaking, XP changes the way programmers work. The book is good at delineating new roles for programmers and managers who Beck calls "coaches." The most striking characteristic of XP is that programmers work in pairs, and that testing is an intrinsic part of the coding process. In a later section, the author even shows where XP works and where it doesn't and offers suggestions for migrating teams and organizations over to the XP process.

In the afterword, the author recounts the experiences that led him to develop and refine XP, an insightful section that should inspire any organization to adopt XP. This book serves as a useful introduction to the philosophy and practice of XP for the manager or programmer who wants a potentially better way to build software. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Extreme Programming (XP) software methodology, principles, XP team roles, facilities design, testing, refactoring, the XP software lifecycle, and adopting XP.

Synopsis

The new concept of Extreme Programming (XP) is gaining more and more acceptance, partially because it is controversial, but primarily because it is particularly well-suited to help the small software development team succeed. This book serves as the introduction to XP that the market will need. XP is controversial, many software development sacred cows don't make the cut in XP; it forces practitioners to take a fresh look at how software is developed. The author recognizes that this "lightweight" methodology is not for everyone. However, anyone interested in discovering what this new concept can offer them will want to start with this book.

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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ronald E Jeffries am 29. Oktober 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
In this short and delightful book, Beck presents the underpinnings of the discipline of software development called "Extreme Programming", or XP. He tells us why the discipline works and the basics of how to do it. (More books are forthcoming, but start here.)
The book addresses lightweight approaches to customer communication, architecture, design, testing - the whole cycle of software development.
XP isn't for everyone: it is for people who have been and want to be passionate about programming, who want to do a good job in today's fast business environment, who are team players, and who are willing to be disciplined about how they do their work.
Hackery? Hardly. Those who fear that XP is "hacking" have not read or do not understand the book. XP is highly disciplined, including more customer contact, more testing, and more design than most projects ever see.
Required Warning: I'm the "self-proclaimed least" of the folks working with XP and writing about it. So I'm biased.
I'm biased for a particularly good reason: I had the chance to try XP in its purest form, on a project that had been in trouble. I wasn't sure everything would work - and where it didn't, we changed and improved the process. That learning is now in the book. I was often surprised by the way XP allowed a team of ordinary humans to consistently delight their customers.
To get the benefits, you have to do the process. Beck has given us the first volume of information on how to build software better, faster, and with more enjoyment.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von J.J. Langr am 6. April 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
I develop software in a dynamic (i.e. chaotic) environment where customers are rarely sure of what they want software to do for them. If we were able to completely blueprint a design and have the customer sign off on it, the requirements would likely have changed the next day.
Extreme Programming Explained puts forth the concept that software is and should be very malleable. It seems to be a variant of the spiral development process, with a chief distinction being that each cycle results in an actual integrated, deployed piece of software. A main differentiator is that XP offers a body of complementary techniques and principles that make very rapid development in a changing world possible.
Competition is too great for companies to risk nine months (of time and dollars) waiting for software that may not meet its needs by the time it is delivered. Getting working software in front of a customer in a very short period of time is critical. However, the overhead of proper reviews and testing cycles is usually too much for an ideal 2-3 week spiral cycle. Pair programming and automated tests, two important concepts that XP promotes, are specific techniques that purport to solve this problem.
One other major positive of this development "methodology" is that it centers around the fact that software is developed by teams of humans -- something most other processes almost never take into account. XP is not geared toward teams of hotshot, superstar developers. It instead realizes that most development organizations are a wide mix of capabilities and experience levels -- something extremely important in this age of a severely limited developer resource pool.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von R. Williams am 13. Mai 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
The claim, in one of the reviews here, that this book is going to rank w/the Gang of 4 book is patently absurd. This book attempts through a kind of Jonathan Edwards Fire and Brimstone approach to convince the reader to get its religion, but when you sum it all up, there isn't much religion to get. All the pillars of the methodology have little or no exposition in the book (unit testing, pair programming, constant builds). They are all mentioned and meekly argued for, but none of them are actually examined. Furthermore, I remember quite distinctly reading about pair programming in Larry Constantine's far better Peopleware a LONG TIME AGO!
Let me add one other crucial point here: this book attempts to achieve acceptance with the reader through creating an impression of both an epiphany and validation. I found that a lot of things that were being espoused here are things I've been doing a long time. I believe many people will find that to be true and consequently will like the book because of the sense of validation it gives. However, when I was done, I couldn't help but think about how much more could have been done here! How about talking about actual unit testing examples? Why not talk about structure within groups; it's far too easy to just say everyone should be doing everything. Profiling, for instance, is clearly not something everyone should be doing. Like so many things in the modern world, this is largely a retread wrapping itself in the cloak of a revolution.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 3. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Chapter after chapter I kept thing that the author would get to something substantive. He never did. Not one example. Not one piece of concrete evidence. He had some good common sense ideas, but they are all presented in such general terms that they are self-evident. The author makes grand assumptions and goes on to explain (in generalizations) his theories which are based upon these assumptions. I often envisioned the author standing on a street corner proclaiming the end of the world or espousing the "scientific" basis of creationism while exposing his complete misunderstanding of science and his willingness to ignore facts that disprove his assertions. This entire book is written as if it were an introductory chapter. It reads like a psychology text - a lot of verbiage which hides the fact that the text has almost nothing to say.
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