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Essential Linux Device Drivers (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 2008


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch
  • Verlag: TBS (2008)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 8131726177
  • ISBN-13: 978-8131726174
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23 x 18 x 3,2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 2.451.982 in Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von B. Roch am 7. Februar 2010
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Sreekrishnan erklärt die einzelnen Gebiete sehr verständlich und ohne Schnörkel. Das Buch ist wesentlich aktueller und fundierter als das sog. "Standardwerk" von Rubini et. al. Für alle Interessierten ein "Must-Have"!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 26 Rezensionen
33 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Can't replace the O'Reilly text 28. Januar 2009
Von Brian Hill - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Like other reviews have stated, this first half of this book is a concise, useful introduction to certain Linux kernel concepts. But the title of the book leads the reader to expect that they could produce a Linux device driver using this book. That turns out not to be the case - no one could produce a driver with this book without the benefit of other reference material. In short, while the O'Reilly "Linux Device Drivers" text has it's shortcomings and is starting to become dated, it is still the only text with which the reader can use as a primary reference to create their own driver. It discusses implementation in detail, which this book does not.

This brings me to the second half of "Essential Linux Device Drivers", where specific device types are discussed. So little time is spent on each type that none are covered in enough detail to actually go off and start a driver of that type. You could be thinking that this book never claimed to enable you to write a PCI driver, for example, and that would be true. It just feels like a reduced scope with increased depth on the remainder would have made a much more useful book, rather than a bathroom reader.
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Good attempt at a driver book, lots of errors ruin the book 29. April 2012
Von Ludvik Jerabek - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Anyone who is looking to purchase this book is either taking a class in driver development or is new to driver development and is looking for guidance. This book is a great attempt at an all in one driver development book, however; falls flat due to errors in the text and code samples. Sadly it is obvious there was very little error checking or testing of code samples in the book. Someone who is new to such a complex subject should be able to rely on accurate code example and explanations without having to constantly be on the lookout for errors. Some of the errors found are expected of new CS students and not seasoned professionals ( eg. Performing kmalloc() without calling kfree() ) or (allocating memory to a single variable in a for loop eg. var_ptr = kmalloc() both of which exist in Example 5.1 of the book ). The author also fails to explain kernel function's arguments and only mentioned the kernel functions themselves. This makes it difficult to know what/why arguments are being passed.

Please see the author's errata page:

[...](Link removed by Amazon)

Additionally there is another errata page for the book:

[...](Link removed by Amazon)

The high number of errors take away from the readers experience with learning the subject. More time is spent reading and checking the author's Errata page to make sure they are not misinformed. This book will probably be worth 4 stars if they release a second edition with all the errors fixed. It may be worth picking up LDD3 as a supplement and probably has less errors. Additionally, the author spends a ton of time in the beginning discussing kernel threads, klists, ktrees, IRQs, softirqs, and other key kernel components and hardware specifics. These concepts would probably be better explained hands on building drivers starting with basic character drivers and progressing to more difficult drivers. Most people learn by doing and seeing first hand, there is no point in throwing a ton of "jargon" at a learner without real context. Often times the author would state after a long dissertation, "We will see this in X chapter" or "When in X chapter refer back". Personally, I don't like bouncing back and forth between pages cross referencing. Such concepts would be better explained in real use cases when writing a drivers throughout the chapters.
30 von 37 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Get Linux Device Drivers from O'REILLY instead 10. Februar 2009
Von Anderson John - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
The people who gave this book 5 starts are either friends of the author, the author himself, or guys who have been writing linux drivers for years and felt like reading what they already knew. Although the author seems to be very knowledgeable on the topic, his book is really terrible at explaining the essential kernel functions needed for writing device drivers and their respective parameters. He only mentions that they exist. To understand what the author is doing, you would have to resort to searching alternate references. Also his examples don't work. I can tell that he never tried to compiled these examples.

After reading the first few chapters, I decided to get the linux device drivers book from O'REILLY and as soon as I started reading, I could point out loads of important information that the first book failed to relay. The examples in the O'REILLY book are also by far better.
19 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Best Linux device driver book yet 6. Mai 2008
Von Anthony Lawrence - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I've been frustrated by many other Linux kernel and device driver books. The authors often make assumptions about the readers knowledge and gloss over areas that can be quite confusing.

To some extent, that's unavoidable: the Linux kernel is monstrous and very complex, and the hardware that drivers control can also be dark and mysterious territory.

I really appreciated this books approach. It's not that everything is explained in complete detail; that would be impossible. However, the author obviously tries very hard to give an overview, an orientation that will hopefully set your mind in the right direction, before diving into details. Throughout the book he adds "go look at this" suggestions that can help you understand whatever he's dealing with at this point.

I think Chapter 2, which is a high level fly-by of the kernel in general, is an absolute masterpiece. That starts by pulling typical kernel boot messages and explaining what they mean and what's going on in code to produce them. It then goes on to discuss kernel locks, briefly looks at procfs and memory allocation, and closes (as each chapter does) with pointers to where to look in the source for the subjects discussed.

Chapters 3 and 4 flesh out basic concepts more, and then after that the book goes into details, picking both real world and fanciful examples of hardware and giving sample device drivers. Simple devices are presented first, while later chapters get into more complicated hardware, but in each case the same general format is followed: overview of the how and why, sample driver(s), how to most easily debug, and pointers to real kernel sources.

Very well done. I have no complaints - oh, a few minor typos, maybe, but nothing serious.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
prefer this book than O'Reilly "Linux Device Drivers" 7. November 2011
Von Yan Zhu - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
It is not an easy task to discuss big system. Maybe this is the reason that not many good linux driver books available and comparison among books mainly focus on this book and "Linux Device Drivers".

In my opinion, to discuss big system the rule of thumb is to get the big picture. That is the strength of this book. The first 4 Chapters give very concise big picture of how kernel works and what we can utilize kernel resource. Also, the author often walk us through some of linux codes. Author carefully chooses the clip of source-code so that we can understand the big picture better.

"Linux Device Drivers" takes a different style. It brings out some concepts as they developed different or more complicated drivers. A lot of details interleave into the discussion. Personally, I didn't like this style. It seems that I need to read at least half of the book to understand the big picture and the critical points that authors try to convey.

Critics about this book is usually about the too simple examples and too brief about some details. For former one, I think it is better to study simple one driver code. Example from "Linux Device Drivers" is usually too complicated for me. For the later one, I believe author usually point out some source code to read.

For readers, I suggest to stay at this book. If the new version of "Linux Device Drivers" comes out, you may also need one.
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