The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana (English Edition) und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 30. Oktober 2005

1 Kundenrezension

Alle 2 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Gebundene Ausgabe
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 475,58 EUR 475,48
2 neu ab EUR 475,58 4 gebraucht ab EUR 475,48

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Große Hörbuch-Sommeraktion: Entdecken Sie unsere bunte Auswahl an reduzierten Hörbüchern für den Sommer. Hier klicken.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.



Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 1009 Seiten
  • Verlag: MonkeyBrain (30. Oktober 2005)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1932265155
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932265156
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 21,4 x 5 x 26 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 2.845.922 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Synopsis

From detective fiction to historical novels, from well-known authors like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, to Russian newspaper serials and Chinese martial arts novels, The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana is a truly exhaustive look at every aspect of fantastic literature in the days of Queen Victoria. Readers of science fiction and fantasy will be surprised to find here the roots of genres thought to be strictly contemporary, and students of literature will be amazed at the breadth and scope of writings produced in the Victoriana era.

Kundenrezensionen

5.0 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
1
4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
Siehe die Kundenrezension
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Niclas Grabowski TOP 1000 REZENSENTVINE-PRODUKTTESTER am 19. August 2006
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Klar wissen wir noch, wer Goethe war. Und Balzac kennen wir natürlich auch. Und Dickens und Bronte werden wir auch nicht vegessen. Neben der hohen Literatur hat das 19. Jahrhundert aber auch eine ungewöhnliche Menge von eigentlich Trivialem hervorgebracht. Und eigentlich hat diese Form von Literatur, Untehaltungsliteratur und auch Pulp Fiction genannt, im Allgemeinen keine hohe Haltbarkeitsdauer.

Aber spätestens in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts stoßen wir auf scheinbar oberflächliche Erzählungen und Romane, die dennoch für unsere heutige Kultur prägend geworden sind und immer wieder zitiert, benutzt, verfremdet werden. Es geht um Autoren wie Jules Verne (20.000 Meilen unter dem Meer), H. G. Wells (Die Zeitmaschine), Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein) und Bram Stoker (Dracula). So stammen wohl die größten Mythen der heutigen Zeit wohl im wesentlichen aus dem 19. Jahrhundert.

Jess Nevins ist bisher dadurch bekannt geworden, dass er zwei Kommentarbände zu einem Comic geschrieben hat. Nämlich zu "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" in dem er für jedes Bild schreibt, welche historischen Personen, Erzählungen und Werke diesen Comic von Alan Moore zugrunde liegen. Wer den Comic kennt, in dem die wichtigsten literarischen Helden des späten 19. Jahrhunderts gemeinsam gegen die ebenfalls literarischen Bösewichte antreten, ahnt schon, dass es auch in diesem Buch in dieser Enzyklopädie eigentlich um nichts anderes geht.

Auf gut 1.000 Seiten wird der Inhalt der Trivialliteratur des 19.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 Rezensionen
30 von 30 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Staggering Scope, Unflagging Pluck, Inexhaustible Vril 3. Februar 2006
Von Kenneth Hite - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Given that this book spans nearly two centuries -- from the beginning of the Gothic in 1765 to the end of Victoria's reign in 1901 -- and the fantastic output of a dozen countries and eight languages, what editor in the world could comprehensively edit Nevins for content? I caught precisely one notable factual lacuna out of possibly 200 entries I was qualified to judge -- perhaps three or four more have slipped in somewhere else. Likewise, Nevins' literary and editorial judgements are sharp and sound, saving only the (admittedly serious) failure to properly index or organize these vast charts of wonder. Razor-keen analyses of general topics -- e.g., "The Edisonade," "Proto-Mysteries" -- complement the litany of names from Captain Nemo all the way down to the Denver Doll, from Axël to Kim to Natty Bumppo.

This level of sheer bull-headed quality is simply unheard of in these debased times, when sloppy, hamfisted graphics (complete with unneeded color illustrations) or cowardly, modish trend-watching are more the order of the day. Both ladled out, of course, at the expense of completeness, forthrightness, and authorial judgement. This is not Jess Nevins' way. His way is that of Inexhaustible Vril and Undaunted Pluck. If something is worth doing, it is worth overdoing; we must err on the side of prolixity, capacity, and emphasis. These are the watchwords that seemingly guided Nevins through the moldering stacks of far-flung archives, across unexplored jungles of foreign newsprint, through the smoky dens of the Mysterious East and the stygian reaches of Subterranean Paris. And the results of his travels, his researches, and yes, his blunt opinions, have been brought back to civilization and once more exposed to the light of modernity. These heroes, villains, monsters, fiendish devices, and lost races -- the dubious shards and priceless finds alike from our graveyard of gods and heroes -- have been comprehensively collected, labeled, annotated, classified, lined up in rows, introduced, prefaced, and put in their place with the satisfying "thunk" that can only come from good hard covers and clean black serif fonts.

In short, Jess Nevins' Encyclopedia is itself a glorious exercise in the Victorian fantastic. Explore it in that same spirit.
17 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A well researched, well written, fascinating book. 2. Januar 2006
Von Robert - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Jess Nevin's Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana covers the protagonists, both heroic and otherwise, of an incredibly innovative era in fantastic literature. Here you will find the roots of concepts in Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror literature that are still being explored today.

The book does have its drawbacks. It's a handsome volume, and the production values are high. However, this is a subject that cries out for interior art from the period to break up an otherwise very dry layout. The book also lacks an index. However, the chapter headings do list the characters covered in each chapter.

I would recommend this book to those with an interest in Victorian literature and early science fiction. It is particularly useful for fan fiction writers and Role Playing Gamers interested in incorporating Victorian elements into their work.
33 von 40 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The Amazing Mr. Nevins and his Encylopedia Victoriana: you will have need of no other book ever again. 27. November 2005
Von JackFaust77 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Fatter than Elvis, smoother than Sinatra and far, far, more erudite than either one, this big honking book, nay 'tis a TOME, is staggering (heavy & detail obsessed) and stunning (one can use it to fend of muggings or to dramatically increase one's own trivia knowledge base). It needs its own zip codes and should only be approached on weekends, when one has lots of time to spare swimming in its golden amber depths. For Western Pop Culture Mavens and Dilettantes, this is the veritable source of the Nile, a thorough mapping of heroes, rogues, adventurers, she-demons, science devices and ancient civilizations.

And better yet, Mr. Nevins has a Pulp volume on the 2007 horizon and a Golden Era Superhero volume to come.

If you're a fan of this era, of of genre fiction, comics, scifi, fantasy, League of Extraorinary Gentlemen, you will fall for this encyclopedia like a ton of bricks.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Awesome! 18. Juli 2006
Von RIJU GANGULY - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Though no encyclopedia can claim to be truly exhaustive, this fantastic work by Jess Nevins is incredible in its breadth as well as in terms of incisiveness. Despite Nevins'somewhat apologetic note regarding being subjective, it is my opinion that that is the only way by which the Victorian literature can be made vivid enough to oversome the fog and gaslight. This work is magnificient in all aspects. Enjoy it.
4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A Reading List That's Worth Reading Itself 24. März 2006
Von Daniel V. Smith - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a page turner for the web generation.

Nevins' prose has the flavor of reading one

of the better blogs: it is clear, opinionated,

and peppered with the print equivalent of links

(in this case, bold-face references to other

entries in the Encyclopedia).

I can't imagine anyone reading this book sequentially.

Almost every entry refers to another entry, making

the reader eager to "follow the link", either forward

or backward, rather than simply turn the page. An

entry for Ayesha can thus lead the reader to Alan

Quartermain, or a discussion of the "New Woman"

literay type, or to a fuller discussion of the

Lost Race and Yellow Peril genres.

The current edition is handsomely bound, but

since it reminds the reader of a blog or web

site frozen on the page, it cries out for a

second edition peppered with period illustrations

to complement each and every entry.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.