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Empty Harvest: Understanding the Link Between Our Food, Our Immunity and Our Planet [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Dr. Dr. Bernard Jensen
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Kurzbeschreibung

1. Januar 1995
Nearly twenty years after its initial publication, Dr. Bernard Jensen’s sobering picture of just how interconnected man is with the earth, and how this connection is being destroyed – link by link – still resonates powerfully. In this eye-opening account of the inherent dangers in our agricultural system, Jensen looks at the better-known manmade disasters, such as the greenhouse effect, as well as the ecological and subsequent health related problems hidden from the general public at the time. Empty Harvest is a groundbreaking book that examines just what the total problem was and still is.

“In a day when it is cheap and easy to be a doomsday prophet, Empty Harvest shines like a bright beacon of hope and ecological sanity. While exposing the dire consequences of thinking we can grow healthy food with poisons, this excellent book defines positive alternatives, and demonstrates their power to restore us to true health. Empty Harvest lights the way toward living in harmony and happiness with the forces of life.”
--John Robbins, author of Diet for a New America

Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 208 Seiten
  • Verlag: Avery Trade; Auflage: 0002 (1. Januar 1995)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 089529558X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895295583
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 22,8 x 15,2 x 1,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 891.930 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Dr. Bernard Jensen was one of America’s pioneering nutritionists and iridologists. Beginning his career in 1929 as a chiropractor, he soon turned to the art of nutrition for his own health problems. He observed firsthand the cultural practices of people in more than fifty-five countries, discovering important links between food and health. In 1955, Dr. Jensen established the Hidden Valley Ranch in Escondido, California as a retreat and learning center dedicated to the healing principles of nature where he saw firsthand the value of nutrition and iridology.

Over the years, Dr. Jensen received many honors and awards, including Knighthood in the Order of St. John of Malta; the Dag Hammarskjold Peace Award of the Pax Mundi Academy in Brussels, Belgium; and an award from Queen Juliana of the Netherlands for his nutritional work. In 1982, he also received the National Health Federation’s Pioneer Doctor of the Year award.

Mark Anderson is a recognized authority on the topics of global ecology and wholistic health. He has spent years traveling the world to study and teach clinical nutrition from the soil up. His stimulating and informative lectures on traditional diets, health patterns of native peoples, and agriculture have been featured at seminars and conferences in Africa, Asia, Europe, and India, as well as throughout the United States and Canada. Mark’s articles about natural approaches to nutrition and health have been published in scores of professional health journals in the United States.

 

Leseprobe. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Part I

Lush Fields Belie an Empty Harvest

1

Soil and Civilization

Healthy soil is America’s greatest natural resource. But few realize that the current state of widespread soil erosion in North America threatens our way of life. It may seem hard to believe, but only a few inches of topsoil stand between you, me, and starvation. Just what makes care of the topsoil so important? There are several things to consider.

First, soil is the medium for all plant life. What is popularly called topsoil is the rich, nutrient-laden cover of the Earth’s crust from which food crops draw their sustenance. Underneath the topsoil there may be clay, shale, or rock—substances that do not support food crops. It is only in the precious shallow topsoil that plants are seeded, germinated, sprouted, nurtured, and grown. These plants serve as food for animals on the lowest ends of the food chain. Animals that eat these plants supply food to animals on the highest ends of the food chain.

Second, attention to topsoil is important because topsoil is easily exhausted from lack of care. The best farmers replenish the soil as it is farmed. Unfortunately, this practice has become an exception to the rule. Results of ignorance of proper agricultural methods can be seen in every country on Earth. Even in the Amazonian tropical rain forest, where many of us might assume that topsoil is extra rich due to the intense heat, humidity, and rapid decomposition of surrounding plants, topsoil exhaustion is epidemic. In this area of the world, farmers continue to practice a form of slash-and-burn agriculture. They cut down several acres of trees and vegetation, burn it, and then plant their crops. In a few seasons, the land is as barren and sterile as a desert. Then, they move on. Needless to say, this practice does not help the soil quality.

Third, care of topsoil is important because it is dependent on life around it to retain its own life-giving properties. One of the main reasons for the famine in East Africa today is lack of topsoil brought about by massive deforestation. At the turn of the century, 90 percent of Ethiopia’s land was covered by forests. Less than a century later, not 5 percent of that forest remains. How did this occur? With the trees cut down for easy profit, the rain water—instead of soaking into the topsoil—rushed down the hillsides, flooded the valleys, and carried the earth off with it. The trees had shaded the soil, and the roots had acted as pumps, drawing water up near the surface of the ground, keeping the water table high. But now they were gone. Without tree roots to keep the water table high, the soil was exposed to sun, wind, and rain. It was baked dry, washed away into streams, rivers, and oceans, or simply blown away. Without soil in which to grow plants to feed animals and humans, mass starvation soon resulted.

Care of our forests cannot be overstressed. This is because the destruction of any kind of forest causes great imbalance in the planet’s ecosystem. Trees are vitally important not only for soil stability but also because they give us our human breath, and we give them theirs. Trees release oxygen and consume carbon dioxide. Humans do the reverse.

Further, deforestation without replanting is a threat to nature because it kills non-hybrid progenitor trees and plants. For instance, the progenitor of all coffee bean trees is from Ethiopia. If the last of these trees died from neglect, the hybrid species would become the ultimate source of coffee beans. But if the hybrid coffee bean trees around the world were then killed by some species-specific disease or agricultural malaise, there would be no original seed to fall back upon. Then, coffee bean trees—not to mention coffee breaks—would become extinct. While coffee is not a matter of life and death, this example of how biology impacts sociology is one that the Earth’s inhabitants might do well to ponder.

THE LIMITS OF EROSION

Some soil erosion is natural. Wind picks up dust, and rain washes it away. Normally, nature can manage to replace the loss, slowly weathering sand and clay from rock, and mixing it with organic matter. But our destructive approach toward agriculture and development speeds erosion rates far beyond what nature can replace.

Highway construction, for instance, can accelerate erosion 200 times the natural rate. In just a matter of months, shopping-center development, surface mining, logging, and off-road vehicles can obliterate topsoil that nature took a thousand years to create—and needs a thousand years to replace.

Just how much damage has man done? In Iowa, topsoils that were once a foot deep today are less than six inches deep. Although it doesn’t sound like much, six inches can be devastating. The United States Department of Agriculture estimates that a six-inch loss of topsoil, such as the current one in the southern Piedmont, is capable of reducing crop yields by 40 percent per year. Though crop loss and deforestation are bad enough, they are not the only soil erosion stories.

Soil erosion interferes with wildlife in many ways. When soil fertility is reduced, there is less life in the soil. That means less food for all animals—from the worms and insects to the birds that eat them to the larger animals that eat birds and, finally, to humans. Soil erosion kills water ecosystems, as well. The silt that accumulates in lakes because of runoff causes the lakes to grow shallower. Then the weeds proliferate, choking off oxygen needed by fish. Fish die, and the same negative sequence of events—only in an aquatic setting—occurs.

My teaching and traveling experiences have made me aware that people are not taught how intricately their lives are woven with the life of their land. This ignorance is reflected in abusive agricultural methods. It is reflected in the way people eat, accepting into their bodies foods grown on sterilized, poisoned soils that have all too few nutrients to impart to the plant—or to them.

WE DON’T HAVE AS MUCH LAND AS WE THINK

Geologists say there are 58 million square miles of land surface on the Earth, but only 10 million square miles of this can be farmed. It takes about two acres of land to feed one person for a year. But, right now, there is only one acre per person, and not all of this is good land. That is why, in my opinion, about two-thirds of the people of the world go to bed hungry every night.

Fortunately, the United States has enough land to feed its people well. But there are still serious problems with the way we use our land. More than half of the agricultural land of the United States has been severely eroded or farmed incorrectly. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, of our current 421 million acres of productive farmlands, 97 million acres are eroding at more than twice the “tolerance” level—the level at which soil can be replaced naturally. Another 89 million acres are eroding at one to two times that tolerance level. In all, nearly 40 percent of our farmlands are losing topsoil.

Ecologist Gene Logsdon wrote, “The fall of almost every civilization is largely on account of raping natural resources until all the easy profit goes out of them.” By the 1930s, most of the “cream” had been skimmed off of American soils, and diminished crops of mineral-deficient vegetables, fruits, and grains began to appear. Interestingly, chronic, degenerative diseases began to escalate at this time, as well—arthritis, diabetes, cancer, lupus, osteoporosis, and dental caries.

TISSUE-INTEGRITY AND WELLNESS

...


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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Book EVERYONE Should Read ! 28. Januar 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
Empty Harvest clearly explains the link between the lack of minerals in our crop soils and the modern day diseases associated with mineral deficiencies (diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc.). The author shows many excellent examples of how mankind is slowly destroying it's future by robbing the Earth of the very things that give us and support life itself.
Empty Harvest is a "wake-up call" for us to start changing our destructive ways, or poor physical and mental health and disease will dominate our lives into the 21st Century and beyond!
By following many of the guidelines in Empty Harvest (especially eating foods grown in nutrient rich soils & taking plant derived major & trace mineral supplements from organic sources), we can maintain or regain optimum health.
Anyone who thinks they are getting all the essential vitamins and minerals they need from the produce section at their local supermarket needs to read Empty Harvest TODAY!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Von Dr. Jones
Format:Taschenbuch
This book explains many aspects of nutrition and what we have done wrong over the years with our diets. I have never seen a book with more quality information and that information is exactly what we need to look at for the causes of many of the diseases we see today. I am a Doctor who deals a lot with nutrition and it is the best book I have ever read on the subject.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  14 Rezensionen
49 von 50 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Book EVERYONE Should Read ! 28. Januar 2000
Von Wayne Wasserman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Empty Harvest clearly explains the link between the lack of minerals in our crop soils and the modern day diseases associated with mineral deficiencies (diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc.). The author shows many excellent examples of how mankind is slowly destroying it's future by robbing the Earth of the very things that give us and support life itself.
Empty Harvest is a "wake-up call" for us to start changing our destructive ways, or poor physical and mental health and disease will dominate our lives into the 21st Century and beyond!
By following many of the guidelines in Empty Harvest (especially eating foods grown in nutrient rich soils & taking plant derived major & trace mineral supplements from organic sources), we can maintain or regain optimum health.
Anyone who thinks they are getting all the essential vitamins and minerals they need from the produce section at their local supermarket needs to read Empty Harvest TODAY!
36 von 39 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen If you really want to understand nutrition and health. 6. Januar 2000
Von Dr. Jones - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book explains many aspects of nutrition and what we have done wrong over the years with our diets. I have never seen a book with more quality information and that information is exactly what we need to look at for the causes of many of the diseases we see today. I am a Doctor who deals a lot with nutrition and it is the best book I have ever read on the subject.
14 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen THIS BOOK HAS CHANGED MY LIFE!!! 5. Dezember 2005
Von L. Prosser - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I just finished reading this book and have started to re-read it. I have been so touched by this book; it has tranformed my attitude and thoughts about my health, the earth and environment. I only hope that everyone who reads my review will read this book or, at least, consider an organic diet in support of preventative health and farmer's whose growing methods are replinishing the valuable topsoil and doing away with highly toxic chemicals. It is hard to believe what "modern society" has done to our planet and health in such a short amount of time. I hope that, one person at a time, we can undo the damage that has been done. A sincere Thank You to the late Bernard Jenson for such thorough and insightful research.
13 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Astounding 11. Dezember 2004
Von Judith K. Ohare - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book should be adopted by our school systems. the most profound read I think I've ever had. a real eye opener.
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Essential health education material 5. Januar 2005
Von Gary Greenfield - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The premise of the book's subtitle - Understanding the Link Between Our Food, Our Immunity and Our Planet - got my attention. And, for the most part, the authors succeed in making their central point. They connect the dots between the quality of the soil, the harvest, our immune system, and our health. This level of holistic thinking is an important foundational piece of any conversation about the systems that are involved in creating personal and planetary health.

The two authors contribute separate sections of the book. Dr. Bernard Jenson is often eloquent and impassioned, and his photographs alone are a powerful testimonial to his ideas. Mark Anderson writes knowledgably about nutrition and provides interesting historical background on agricultural science and nutrition research - and the work of special interest groups to suppress unfavorable findings and individuals, and corporations who promote bogus notions. [Did you know that smoking cigarettes was once advertised as an aid to digestion? Yikes!]

On the whole, this book mostly lives up to its promise, but it does so somewhat unevenly. Most scientific material is explained and substantiated in some detail - vitamin C, candida albicans, calcium, and the symbiotic relationship between plants and soil. But other subjects receive such superficial treatment that they would have been better off omitted - the chapter on cleansing and detoxification is too general to be of real use to anybody considering implementing such a program.

The content and message of the book would have been better served with more skillful editing because the material often comes across as somewhat haphazardly organized, making it harder to reconnect the parts to the whole. Also, given the publication date, 1989, I'd recommend double-checking some of the theories and explanations offered, since our understanding of how things work - whether in the body or the environment -- has undoubtedly changed in 15 years; ditto for some of the doomsday predictions data.
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