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Emotionally Weird (Englisch) Taschenbuch – Juli 2001


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 368 Seiten
  • Verlag: Picador; Auflage: First. (Juli 2001)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 031227999X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312279998
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 14 x 2,8 x 20,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (11 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 1.937.947 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

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Family history and identity are Kate Atkinson's twinned keynote themes. Behind the Scenes at the Museum (winner of the Whitbread Book of the year), had "The Family" at its centre, a sweep of charming, related genes who sauntered through the fin de siècle to the less glamorous 1992. Her second novel, Human Croquet starred the Fairfaxes, all missing mothers, perfumed with nicotine and danger, and strange aunts. Larkin may be right, your parents fuck you up but in Atkinson's novels you have to find out who they are before you can start laying blame.

On the surface, Emotionally Weird follows the trend. Effie and her mother Nora are staying in the decaying family home on a small island off the West coast of Scotland. To keep themselves amused they begin telling stories. Nora's are about their ancestors, in whose veins blood blue as "delphiniums and lupins" flows, and the real identity of Effie's father and mother. Nora's language is like her "sea-change eyes", full of poetry and strange beauty. Effie's tales of life at the University of Dundee and her life with Star Trek obsessed Bob are more prosaic and funny: "I did so hope that Bob was a dress rehearsal, a kind of mock relationship, like a mock exam, to prepare me for the real thing."

The novel becomes troublesome where it follows Effie to a creative writing course at the university. The class is run by Martha: who writes poetry "with impenetrable syntax about a life where nothing happened." The other characters in the novel are pre-occupied with the same need to find meaning through writing. Archetypal detective stories, sword and sorcery fantasy, doctor and nurse romantic scenarios, existential angst and liberal use of ellipses are given free reign. Whilst this self-conscious wordplay is fun for those who enjoy a more literary book, those who simply enjoy a good read may get lost in the jostle of competing language construction.

In this novel, confused paternity is only part of the struggle for identity, the words you use are also defining- you are what you write. Some readers will revel in the Shandy-esque shape of the experimental in this narrative, others may find it's a literary joke taken too far.--Eithne Farry. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Pressestimmen

"A sparkling comic meditation on how authors choose to tell their stories."--Entertainment Weekly (grade: A-)

“…Reads like the fictional equivalent of a magic trick; you might wonder how she pulls it off, but you’re certain to marvel at the results.” —Harper’s Bazaar

“A full-bore, old-fashioned yarn—the kind that keeps you turning pages, hurrying toward the denouement long after you’ve told yourself you’re going to bed.”  —The Washington Post Book World

“Beautifully written…brimming with quirky characters and original storytelling.... Kate Atkinson has struck gold with this unique offering.” —Time Out

"Atkinson has found her best subject…a truly funny comic novel." —Newsday


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Kundenrezensionen

3.3 von 5 Sternen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von dirtwitch am 25. Juni 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Atkinson is the sort of writer I read in a blissful state. Her characters are many layered, her wordplay is fantastical, her plotline engrossing. I appreciate that her characters are, while not always exactly sane, intelligent. That's not something I can say about many novelists.
She is a new find for me, and I'm very happy to have found a writer I enjoy as much as Barbara Trapido. From me, this is a very high compliment.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 21. Juni 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I had enjoyed "Behind the Scenes at the Museum" and "Human Croquet" so much that I eagerly anticipated Kate Atkinson's next release. I must admit, I'm a bit disappointed. Atkinson's unconventional yet compelling use of perspective has been present in all of her novels. However, in "Emotionally Weird", the story becomes completely buried beneath dozens of functionless characters and hazy motives. Her unique style... fresh and funny... shone through in her first two novels. Here it is lost to a weaker plot and gloomy scenery.
I must admit that part of what may have alienated me (as a silly American)was the overwhelming presence of unfamiliar Scottish references. Whereas these same type of landmarks may have been present in "Behind the Scenes at the Museum", there they were made familiar and funny by their meaning to the more likable characters that she had created.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Nora and Effie Stuart-Murray are sitting on an island off the west coast of Scotland, telling each other stories. Effie's tale is of her recent life as a student at Dundee University, whilst Nora tells of Effie's murky family history, with the announcement that she is not, in fact, Effie's mother. The hyphenated 'Stuart' is the only clue left that Nora and Effie have royalty as ancestors.
However, you do begin to worry about this novel when Effie's audience, Nora, gets bored and decides to go to bed. If a fictional character has been diagnosed with ennui, then what chance have we of following this novel to its conclusion? We get to see the fascinating acts of feeding cats, the boiling of kettles in Effie's life story, but we do also get occasional glimpses of the invasion of Vietnam. Effie quotes large chunks of Archie McCue's abstract lecture, as if to prove how boring the man is, when one or two words would have sufficed. Archie's lecture appears to happen in real time, and it seems as though Atkinson is writing the antithesis of a crime novel, by having all her main suspects meet up in the beginning, rather than at the end. But Archie McCrue is no detective. Chick Petrie is, and so is Madame Astarti, the heroine of Effie's attempt at fiction. Practically everyone who is anyone turns up at McCrue's lecture, an unlikely scenario for an early morning lecture during a power cut in the strikes of 72.
Emotionally Weird takes a long time to get going. There's something wacky about all the characters, but none of them are truly amusing. In a recent interview in the Observer, Kate Atkinson commented that she found it very difficult to get going on this novel, and to achieve the right tone, and I'm afraid it shows in these early pages.
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Von Daniel am 31. Mai 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
When this book came out in the UK in May I was so excited, I even bought it in hardback. Kate Atkinson is that rare writer - one who knows as much about writing as how to write, and she shows this to advantage in an extremely clever book. She veers on the self-indulgent with her myriad storylines interweaving in and out of this book, but her charm and great good humour shine throughout; and I greatly regretted that we did not see more of her lead character's gloriously campy and wickedly parody-like detective novel. The word games and language play which characterise Atkinson are not so subtle as they were in "Human Croquet" (which still remains her best novel) but they still provide a source of much enjoyment and delight; amusing us as much as they entertain the brain and make the reader think. She is one of our greatest modern writers, and even if Emotionally Weird is not as good as her last two books (Human Croquet, and Behind The Scenes at the Museum, which latter is much praised by people and described as "The perfect novel") , and is, undeniably, flawed in some ways - The symbolism and development of Atkinson's storyline, with the private eye and the yellow dog, is not as clear cut as one would wish for. However - and this is the truly magical thing - with an Atkinson novel, you can re-read it and everything suddenly becomes different. Words dropped here and there become surprisingly important, dialogue leaps into focus, things you ignored suddenly force themselves into your consciousness a second time around. The book grips the brain as much as it thrills and mystifies, entertains and satisfies. Not only is it extremely funny, extremely baffling, and extremely intelligent, but it is extreme in its own right.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Besides the fact that I laughed out loud too often to explain while reading this book (e.g. protagonist Effie's boyfriend Bob, with his silly slumbering Star Trek mumblings and collegiate torpor, is sheer hilarious classical material), it also surpassed all my wildest literary expectations: more sophisticated and smarter romantical/fanciful interweaving than Barbara Trapido; intelligent and interesting characters well worth knowing; inventive narrative (narratee?) line; creative format; and best of all, an anti-baloney perspective on academic philosopher/sophist/post -modern/deconstuctionist idiots but that still has an awesome sense of humor. Did I mention that I laughed out loud Very Often reading this book? That Never Happens to me!. I stayed up nights to finish this, and I cannot wait for more from Ms Atkinson. It really led me to understand that my experience in an American college (studying Classics) during the 80s was not at all too different from this account of life at University of Dundee, Scotland in the 70s. What a gas! Funny thing but - when I got to the final part and saw it was prefaced '1999' - I was surprised, until I remembered that the first part was prefaced '1972' or whatever - it all seems so perfectly au courant. Maybe that was because so many characters said "As if" and the author alludes to sheep cloning - was that done first at U of Dundee? Anyone?
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