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Earthborn (Homecoming) [Kindle Edition]

Orson Scott Card
3.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (23 Kundenrezensionen)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

SF takes old myths and genetically modified them for today's world, from George Lucas doing knight-saves-fair-lady in space to Star Trek's Wagon Train to the Stars. Orson Scott Card's five-volume Homecoming series goes one step further, reshaping some of the most potent myths of all. In effect, he rewrites the Bible as SF, telling an Old Testament story of interstellar Exodus. The planet Harmony was colonised by humans 40 million years ago. Now the orbiting computer, Oversoul, that has governed the planet for all that time, is starting to fail. It selects some humans to make the long trip back to Earth, to contact the even more powerful Keeper and find out how to proceed. By the time humans return to the world, they find that two indigenous races that evolved to intelligence over the 40 million years they were away, the mole-like Earth People, or diggers, and the airborn Sky People, or angels. Earthborn does work, just about, as a standalone story; but it works best as the conclusion to Card's five-book epic of a people freed from bondage like the Israelites from Egypt and the vicissitudes they suffer.

Card's Mormon beliefs are more strongly represented in this book than in some of his others. Earthborn is essentially a story about Free Will, the reasons why God (Card's "Keeper") grants it and the fact that some people will use it to do evil things. This sounds dry, and Card's pious conclusion is a little overplayed, but Card has a reputation in SF for a good reason. He builds all his novels around directly engaging characters and clear-cut moral dilemmas. In this novel it is the most basic dilemma of all: will the attractive but flawed central character Akma choose truth or falsehood, good or evil? If you've read the preceding four Homecoming books then this one is must-buy; and even if this is your first Card novel you'll see why he is one of the world's most highly regarded SF authors. This book may not be at the level of Ender's Game or Xenocide--Card's masterpieces--but it does build a powerful and very human momentum. --Adam Roberts, author of Salt

Amazon.co.uk

SF takes old myths and genetically modified them for today's world, from George Lucas doing knight-saves-fair-lady in space to Star Trek's Wagon Train to the Stars. Orson Scott Card's five-volume Homecoming series goes one step further, reshaping some of the most potent myths of all. In effect, he rewrites the Bible as SF, telling an Old Testament story of interstellar Exodus. The planet Harmony was colonised by humans 40 million years ago. Now the orbiting computer, Oversoul, that has governed the planet for all that time, is starting to fail. It selects some humans to make the long trip back to Earth, to contact the even more powerful Keeper and find out how to proceed. By the time humans return to the world, they find that two indigenous races that evolved to intelligence over the 40 million years they were away, the mole-like Earth People, or diggers, and the airborn Sky People, or angels. Earthborn does work, just about, as a standalone story; but it works best as the conclusion to Card's five-book epic of a people freed from bondage like the Israelites from Egypt and the vicissitudes they suffer.

Card's Mormon beliefs are more strongly represented in this book than in some of his others. Earthborn is essentially a story about Free Will, the reasons why God (Card's "Keeper") grants it and the fact that some people will use it to do evil things. This sounds dry, and Card's pious conclusion is a little overplayed, but Card has a reputation in SF for a good reason. He builds all his novels around directly engaging characters and clear-cut moral dilemmas. In this novel it is the most basic dilemma of all: will the attractive but flawed central character Akma choose truth or falsehood, good or evil? If you've read the preceding four Homecoming books then this one is must-buy; and even if this is your first Card novel you'll see why he is one of the world's most highly regarded SF authors. This book may not be at the level of Ender's Game or Xenocide--Card's masterpieces--but it does build a powerful and very human momentum. --Adam Roberts, author of Salt


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2416 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 451 Seiten
  • Verlag: Tor Books (15. Mai 1996)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B003GWX8NU
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (23 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #245.899 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Real life characters, real life story 6. Juli 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
I felt that this series was wonderful, and I think that I enjoyed 5 the most (partially for the same reasons as the "reader from Texas"). I read them all in less than two weeks. I am also a Mormon and so I had a wonderful time "guessing" the outcome of the books because I already knew what would happen from the Book of Mormon. The Keeper of Earth is obviously God. The magma, etc. is only one of the tools he uses. To refute those who are angry at Orson Scott Card for discontinuing the story of Naifi and his brothers, that is where the story leaves off in the Book of Mormon, also. I'm sure he didn't write more about them because that's all we know about the lives of the real Nephi and his brothers. I believe that they were people that actually lived, as does he, and I understand that he didn't want to write more about them because obviously that's all there was that was important because that's all that Nephi wrote about his own life. Life is not always wrapped up in a neat package. Nephi and his brothers, Laman and Lemuel never came to terms, so neither did Naifi, Elemak, and Mebbekew. I felt that he did a very good job bridging the gap between books 4 and 5. Many reviewers said they didn't like the "moralizing" and the anti-climactic resolution of the story. They said that Akma was "obviously a metaphor for an atheist." Akma was not a metaphor for anything! Orson Scott Card was simply writing the story of Alma the Younger as it is found in the Book of Mormon. Akma's story actually happened! And if you don't believe that, please respect Orson Scott Card's beliefs anyway. I would recommend this book to anyone, and especially to members of the LDS church. For those who hunger to learn more about the peoples in the Homecoming Series, read the Book of Mormon! It adds to Card's stories of Nephi (Nafai), and tells much more about Alma (Akma) and how he became chief judge over the people.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Inexplicable, Tedious, and Just Plain Bad 23. Januar 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
I have no idea what Card is about. The first four volumes of the series had high and low points, but did pull you into the plot and the characters. What this volume is about is a puzzle to me. An almost entirely new set of characters is introduced, the societies presented are not related to the societies in the previous volumes, the motivations of the actors and actions seem like a sociological treatise, and, frankly, I was unable to stir up interest in either chaacters or plot. I am lost to understand what Card is trying to do, except to throw in an unrelated volume to stretch what is an otherwise decent series. Other reviewers have argued that Card's plot and focus is consistent in a broad sense. I understand that arguement, though I do not agree with it. But, even if there is a broader plot, Card simply doesn't deliver it in this volume. This last volume strikes me much like the Riverworld series ... it continues in terms of turning out pages and rolling down the river, but the pages don't lead to anywhere. This book, in my mind, is the epitome of the typical Card seies ... a slow paced, but engaging start. A well wrought world and society. Careful and lengthy character development. Threads that are well woven and all accounted for. Then, a seeming loss of steam or interest or skill with an anti-climatic resolution. This volume exceeds even the typical Card resolution. It would have been better for both audience and author if Card had stopped before writing this volume. It is, perhaps, the worst science fiction I have read by a major author.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Great & Thoughtful Book 27. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
I normally don't write reviews, but I don't agree with some of the other reviewers. I really enjoyed this book. Of course I'm biased. I also love the Book of Mormon which very clearly inspired the characters and plot of this book (see Mosiah 7-27). I thought this book was worth reading for its own sake, but it was very interesting viewing the Book of Mormon and our own society through the unusual lens that Card has crafted. There are a huge number of fascinating details to be observed and thought about here. His world is so vividly realized that it was quite easy (for me) to imagine the "history" between volumes 4 and 5. This book has real people (humans, angels, & diggers) with real problems that we can relate to in fascinating settings. Others of his books are too brutally frank about violence and sexual themes for comfort, but this one was relatively light, much more so than the first four books in the series (enough so that I bought this book, but checked the others out of the library).
I was left yearning for more. Card is easily one of the best writers that I have ever read. I hope that he inspires many others to go and do likewise. I loved the Homecoming series. I am also enjoying his Alvin Smith series quite a bit.
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Format:Taschenbuch
To the majority of the world's sci-fi readership, Earthborn's plot is as unguessable from page to page as the next book. To one coming from Card's own religion, the plot and its eventual end are known, or at least guessed at, from the early chapters of Memory of Earth. The plot comes from well known stories in the Book of Mormon, the Mormon Church's companion volume of scripture to the Bible. Card's great strength as a writer is in exploring the human condition in all its aspects. He uses the unlimited creative potential of Sci-fi as a writing device to construct whatever universe best allows him to examine his subjects. In this series Card uses Sci-fi to distance the Book of Mormon stories just enough from their scriptural context that it can appeal to all readership, but keeps the real major events intact as they are in the scripture. I believe his journey in writing these books is a personal one of coming closer to his heroes in the Book of Mormon and exploring the reasons behind some of the actions of people in that book. You want to understand and get more out of this series? I suggest a reading of The Book of Mormon as well.
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Earthborn -- I WANTED MORE
I couldn't believe that it was all over after I finished Earthborn. After feeling so close to the original characters from the previous four novels, I was so saddened to see that... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 5. Juli 2000 von Noel Swasta
2.0 von 5 Sternen Shedemei's Story
Only really it isn't. I was a bit disconcerted by the end of book 4 where he fast forwarded through human history and the Elenaki / Nafari wars but I figured he'd come back to it... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 27. Juni 2000 von Adam Adamant
4.0 von 5 Sternen This is a great series.
I enjoyed this book, but as other reviewers, I did wonder what happened between the fourth and fifth book, being so attached to the characters. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 11. Juni 2000 von Nathan A Mordecai
1.0 von 5 Sternen Free speech: bad, fundamentalism: good
I read the four books before this waiting for the big payoff, the finale to end it all. What do I get? Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 29. März 2000 veröffentlicht
1.0 von 5 Sternen A little too moralistic & patronising.
I wanted to like this. I really enjoyed the previous 4 books, but this one left me feeling cold. The blatant moralising was a bit too much. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Februar 2000 von Ian Springall
3.0 von 5 Sternen A disappointing ending to a riveting series
I was disappointed by Earthborn. Yes, it has the grand sweep, the fascinating characters, the Search for The Meaning of Life. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 7. Dezember 1999 von N. Lai
4.0 von 5 Sternen Do you even know what the storyline was about?
This was a wonderful book. The only reason I give it a 4 star rating is that this is supposedly the last one. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 6. September 1999 veröffentlicht
2.0 von 5 Sternen What's the problem with the Spanish edition????
Compré el primer libro de la saga en España y realmente me encantó. Por eso, cuando llegue a Argentina (donde vivo) me compré el 2do, 3ro y 4to. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 31. Mai 1999 veröffentlicht
1.0 von 5 Sternen Orson ..... Please!!!
Why did he do it? The brother conflict which was the glue of the first four books was never resolved. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 25. März 1999 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen An adequate book but disapointed me after the first four.
As usual Mr. Card is an excellent writer but I was very disapointed that he didn't continue the characters from the previous four books which were absolutely wonderful. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 28. Januar 1999 veröffentlicht
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