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Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie (Englisch) Taschenbuch – September 2006


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 273 Seiten
  • Verlag: Scholastic (September 2006)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0439755204
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439755207
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: 11 - 15 Jahre
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 18,1 x 12,7 x 1,4 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 76.128 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Synopsis

From first-time novelist Jordan Sonnenblick, this is a brave and beautiful story that will make readers laugh and break their hearts at the same time. When thirteen-year-old Steven's little brother is diagnosed with leukemia, Steven's world is turned upside down. He is forced to deal with Jeffrey's illness and his parents' attempts to keep the family in one piece. "Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pie" is a heart warming journey through a year in the life of a family in crisis. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Freddy am 19. April 2011
Format: Taschenbuch
Rezension 1 (by M.B.):
If you find out that your little brother has cancer, what would you do?
Steven Alper is a normal 13-year-old teenager with the ordinary problems. He fell in love with the most beautiful girl from school but she doesn't recognize him, he's the youngest member and the drummer of the All-City High School Jazz Band an the other musicians don't really take him serious, his best friend Annette is a bit crazy and sometimes it's difficult to stay with her.
And there is his little brother Jeffrey who really annoys him with his little blond ringlets and his sweet smile.
But then the family finds out that Jeffrey has cancer ' leukemia and suddenly Steven's life changes.
His mother goes with Jeffrey to a special hospital in Philadelphia a few times a month, his father works as hard as he can to save the family from debts, because Jeffrey's treatment costs much.
First Steven can't deal with the whole situation but then he understands how much he really loves his brother and he decides to protect him in every case.
Different people help him on his way: Annette, who organizes a benefit concert of the All-City Jazz Band for Jeffrey; Samantha, a girl Steven meets at the hospital in Philadelphia, who shows him, that having al little brother is a wonderful thing and Jeffrey himself, who still takes everything with a smile and who loves Steven more than every other person in the world.

Jordan Sonnenblick wrote with 'Drums, girls and dangerous pie' a funny, sad and a tragic novel about the serious theme 'cancer'.
With his main character Steven he has created a wonderful hero, who talks to the reader in a sarcastic voice, makes him smile and (in my case) cry.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von TeensReadToo am 25. Februar 2011
Format: Taschenbuch
Gold Star Award Winner!

"The most annoying thing in the world is...My little brother, Jeffrey." That's what thirteen-year-old Steven Alper had written in his journal for his English class. But on October 7th, everything changed. Jeffrey had a small accident in the kitchen, was taken to the emergency room, and was diagnosed with leukemia.

Steven's life turns upside down, and just when he needs his parents the most, his mom has to spend most of her days at the hospital taking care of his brother, and his dad is mostly keeping to himself, too worried about the bills to spend time with or even talk to his oldest son. Steven wants to believe that everything will just go back to normal, and tries to release his anger, anxiety, and fears by playing the drums. But his brother doesn't seem to be getting any better, and Steven has a hard time concentrating at school, he's not turning in his homework, and his grades are starting to fall behind. To make things worse, he doesn't want anyone to find out what is going on--but somehow his best friend, Annette, the school counselor, and even Renee Albert, the hottest girl in the eighth grade, all seem to know that something is not right.

This unforgettable novel took me on an incredibly moving ride. And when I felt I was all the way down on this emotional roller coaster, and found myself struggling to see the words through my tears, Sonnenblick lifted me up gently, word by word, page by page, and put a grin on my face that eventually turned into a big smile and then an out-loud laugh. The author's great voice shows real characters with real feelings, and the true struggle of a teenager trying to understand the unfairness of a deadly disease, and how to cope with the fear of losing his beloved little brother.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 226 Rezensionen
36 von 41 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A heartbreaker 25. August 2009
Von Stefanie Lueck - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I love this book. Sonnenblick tells a heartbreaking story, so heartfelt, with ease and humor that you must fall in love with the hero and everybody around him. The hero, Steven a normal teenager with a big passion and talent for drums basically thinks of his drum playing and the hottest girl in his class, who doesn't care about him. His world turns upside down when his little brother Jeffry gets cancer. First, Steven, whose parents give most of their attention to Jeffry now, dives into self pity. But very soon discovers that his brother needs him and taking care about his brother and family brings a new possibility in Steven's life. In the face of all possible Drama he discovers a sense of humour, well-being and the magic life has.

This is what I love most about the book, Sonnenblick is showing a way to have magic in our lives, even when the circumstances are challenging. And the story is just breathtaking, you won't want to stop reading.

2 other books I highly recommend to everyone who is looking for more magic in their life, whether your life is already good or you face some challenges of your own are: "Being Here: Modern Day Tales of Enlightenment" and "Working on Yourself Doesn't Work: The 3 Simple Ideas That Will Instantaneously Transform Your Life" by Ariel and Shya Kane. The authors found a way of living and share it in their books, that opens possibilities to have a fulfilling and magical live regardless of the circumstances you live in. Both books are written so heartfelt and with humor it's treat to read, also they are very practical and useful in day to day life.
21 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A frank and honest portrayal of the uncomfortable realities of living with someone who's sick 21. Oktober 2005
Von Teen Reads - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
DRUMS, GIRLS & DANGEROUS PIE starts out breezily enough. Told in the sarcasm-laced voice of 13-year-old Steven, the novel describes his various adolescent trials and tribulations, all of which are familiar yet still cringe-worthy --- he has a crush on the hottest girl in school, has an angelic-looking yet demonic little brother named Jeffrey, and his parents irk and annoy him constantly. With a droll and ironic tone, teacher and first-time novelist Jordan Sonnenblick paints Steven both convincingly and with enough color to make him an amusing and compelling narrator. Readers will be ready and willing to let Steven narrate the woes of adolescence for 273 pages, without expecting anything more or less from the novel.

Steven's story takes a sharp turn, however, into potentially over-dramatic emotional ground when Jeffrey's nosebleeds turn out to be an indicator of something serious. Yet Sonnenblick handles Steven and his family's reactions to Jeffrey's diagnosis and the onslaught of his illness with an admirable balance of humor and compassion. Jeffrey's initial question to his mother after they return from the hospital in Philadelphia is, "So Mom, everything's OK right? This whole cancer mistake is sorted out?" And Sonnenblick's treatment of the different reactions of Jeffrey's parents --- Steven describes his mother as "weepy" and his father as "a zombie" --- is both nuanced and realistic. Steven has to break his parents' emotional states into simple, one-word summations, because he fears grappling with the extent of what they're going through and why; by acknowledging the complexity of their anguish, he must acknowledge the fact that his brother might die.

It takes a while for Steven to come to terms with Jeffrey's illness, and the process is rendered thoughtfully and without cliché. Reflections such as "Once I was forced to believe that Jeffrey really had cancer my mind played another big trick on me. I started to think that if I just made the right promises to God. He would magically make Jeffrey better again" and Steven's frustration with teachers who call him a "trooper" are perfect examples of the little details that make this novel so honest and real. Steven's attempt to get a handle on all the anxieties that surround the progression of his brother's illness, while trying to balance school dances, drumming solos and head-over-heels-crushes, is handled with equal candor.

Steven is not the only remarkably credible character; his parents, his teachers, his brother and even his crush, Renee, are all well-drawn and believable. The fact that this novel never relies on formulaic plotlines or stock characters is no doubt due to the author's own experience with having a family member diagnosed with cancer. Sonnenblick has an obvious desire to present the potentially melodramatic and sappy subject of cancer with frankness, never shying away from conveying the uncomfortable realities of living with someone who is sick. The result is this honest, engaging, never syrupy, and rather groundbreaking novel.

Readers who have never gone through what Steven is going through will have a newfound understanding of what it is like to --- very literally --- battle someone else's cancer. Those who have will be grateful to Sonnenblick for getting it so right.

--- Reviewed by Jennifer Krieger
27 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
You do not want stop reading 7. Mai 2009
Von Antje Ahlborn - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
You know those books you don't want to take out of your hands and you search for words to describe what you liked about it...Well this is one of them. This book, written from the point of view of a thirteen year old boy, who sees himself confronted with the fact that his five year old brother has cancer. It's straightforward, with no exaggeration. A work, full of wisdom that shows how we much too often think about things we can't change instead of seeing what we can.

Another book that opens the door to seeing other possibilities one can choose in life isWorking on Yourself Doesn't Work: The 3 Simple Ideas That Will Instantaneously Transform Your Life

Give yourself the gift of both these books!
8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Unexpected 20. Oktober 2005
Von Stacey Goldblatt - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I picked this book up yesterday, read the inside flap about the author being a middle school English teacher and was sold. I hadn't read the other flap, the one at the front that gives a summary of the book, so I was truly surprised while reading. I started reading after I put the kids down and couldn't stop-read it in one sitting it was THAT compelling.

Sonnenblick manages to create Steven Alper, an eighth grade boy who is thrown into the utter despair of dealing with his brother's Leukemia. But what's so fresh about it is that Steven is still forced to face the trials and turbulence of teen-hood despite the fact that his family life as he knows it has taken a turn for the worst. Steven's dimensional thoughts run the true gamut, from grief to illusions of grandeur.

I think what's so important about this book (speaking as a former eighth grade English teacher) is that although it appeals to teens and adults alike, it is a perfect read for a middle schooler. Sonnenblick obviously listens to his students, is keyed in to what makes a middle schooler different from a high schooler. He knows the voice and in Steven has created a character that embodies the thoughts and mixed emotions of a boy who is teetering between boyhood and young adulthood-in Steven you see the true metamorphosis.

I would be remiss not to mention the music in this book. Steven's life-line and main coping mechanism is his involvement with his drums. Sonnenblick provides the reader with a virtual soundtrack. One can hear Steven at his drum pad and drum set and catch the beat of the bass drum and the ding of the cymbals. I couldn't help but think it nothing shy of brilliant for Sonnenblick to plant mentors like Dizzi Gillespie and Dave Brubeck in his book as parallels to Steven himself. Even if he struggles to stay afloat, Steven becomes the music, the beat, the mentor to his ill brother Jeffrey and you get the feeling that without Steven, Jeffrey, at five-years-old, wouldn't have the will to move forward.

The writing is vivid as are the feelings conveyed. Lots of tears and laughs in this one. A great read.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Courtesy of Teens Read Too 17. Januar 2007
Von TeensReadToo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
"The most annoying thing in the world is...My little brother, Jeffrey." That's what 13-year-old Steven Alper had written in his journal for his English class. But on October 7th, everything changed. Jeffrey had a small accident in the kitchen, was taken to the emergency room, and was diagnosed with leukemia.

Steven's life turns upside down, and just when he needs his parents the most, his mom has to spend most of her days at the hospital taking care of his brother, and his dad is mostly keeping to himself, too worried about the bills to spend time with or even talk to his oldest son. Steven wants to believe that everything will just go back to normal, and tries to release his anger, anxiety, and fears by playing the drums. But his brother doesn't seem to be getting any better, and Steven has a hard time concentrating at school, he's not turning in his homework, and his grades are starting to fall behind. To make things worse, he doesn't want anyone to find out what is going on--but somehow his best friend, Annette, the school counselor, and even Renee Albert, the hottest girl in the eighth grade, all seem to know that something is not right.

This unforgettable novel took me on an incredibly moving ride. And when I felt I was all the way down on this emotional roller coaster, and found myself struggling to see the words through my tears, Sonnenblick lifted me up gently, word by word, page by page, and put a grin on my face that eventually turned into a big smile and then an out-loud laugh. The author's great voice shows real characters with real feelings, and the true struggle of a teenager trying to understand the unfairness of a deadly disease, and how to cope with the fear of losing his beloved little brother.

So you think your little brother is a pest? You will think again after reading this touching story.

Tissues are highly recommended.

The paperback edition of DRUMS, GIRLS, & DANGEROUS PIE also includes a section with an interview, information about the author, tips on writing, and a preview of Jordan Sonnenblick's next novel, Notes From The Midnight Driver.

Reviewed by: Christian C.
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