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Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Eric J. Evans
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Kurzbeschreibung

20. August 2003
"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. "His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. "The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers-it is a future classic." -Ralph Johnson, author of Design Patterns "If you don't think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you've forgotten to do. "Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion." -Dave Collins, author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling-and building-business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric's descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." -Luke Hohmann, author of Beyond Software Architecture "This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer." -Kent Beck "What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important." -Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(TM) Programming with IBM(R) WebSphere(R) The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process. Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development. Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis-refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code-in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Driven Design then builds on this foundation, and addresses modeling and design for complex systems and larger organizations.Specific topics covered include: * Getting all team members to speak the same language * Connecting model and implementation more deeply * Sharpening key distinctions in a model * Managing the lifecycle of a domain object * Writing domain code that is safe to combine in elaborate ways * Making complex code obvious and predictable * Formulating a domain vision statement * Distilling the core of a complex domain * Digging out implicit concepts needed in the model * Applying analysis patterns * Relating design patterns to the model * Maintaining model integrity in a large system * Dealing with coexisting models on the same project * Organizing systems with large-scale structures * Recognizing and responding to modeling breakthroughs With this book in hand, object-oriented developers, system analysts, and designers will have the guidance they need to organize and focus their work, create rich and useful domain models, and leverage those models into quality, long-lasting software implementations.

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Synopsis

"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. "His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. "The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers--it is a future classic." --Ralph Johnson, author of Design Patterns "If you don't think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you've forgotten to do. "Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it.This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion.

" --Dave Collins, author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling--and building--business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric's descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." --Luke Hohmann, author of Beyond Software Architecture "This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer." --Kent Beck "What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important."--Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java Programming with IBM(R) WebSphere(R) The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design.

Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process. Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development. Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic.A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team.

A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Driven Design then builds on this foundation, and addresses modeling and design for complex systems and larger organizations.Specific topics covered include: *Getting all team members to speak the same language *Connecting model and implementation more deeply *Sharpening key distinctions in a model *Managing the lifecycle of a domain object *Writing domain code that is safe to combine in elaborate ways *Making complex code obvious and predictable *Formulating a domain vision statement *Distilling the core of a complex domain *Digging out implicit concepts needed in the model *Applying analysis patterns *Relating design patterns to the model *Maintaining model integrity in a large system *Dealing with coexisting models on the same project *Organizing systems with large-scale structures *Recognizing and responding to modeling breakthroughs With this book in hand, object-oriented developers, system analysts, and designers will have the guidance they need to organize and focus their work, create rich and useful domain models, and leverage those models into quality, long-lasting software implementations.

Buchrückseite

“Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing.

“His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique.

“The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers—it is a future classic.”

     —Ralph Johnson, author of Design Patterns

“If you don’t think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you’ve forgotten to do.

“Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion.”

     —Dave Collins, author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces

“Eric weaves real-world experience modeling—and building—business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric’s descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field.”

     —Luke Hohmann, author of Beyond Software Architecture

"This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer."

--Kent Beck

"What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important."

--Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java™ Programming with IBM® WebSphere®

The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process.

Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development.

Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Driven Design then builds on this foundation, and addresses modeling and design for complex systems and larger organizations.Specific topics covered include:

  • Getting all team members to speak the same language
  • Connecting model and implementation more deeply
  • Sharpening key distinctions in a model
  • Managing the lifecycle of a domain object
  • Writing domain code that is safe to combine in elaborate ways
  • Making complex code obvious and predictable
  • Formulating a domain vision statement
  • Distilling the core of a complex domain
  • Digging out implicit concepts needed in the model
  • Applying analysis patterns
  • Relating design patterns to the model
  • Maintaining model integrity in a large system
  • Dealing with coexisting models on the same project
  • Organizing systems with large-scale structures
  • Recognizing and responding to modeling breakthroughs

With this book in hand, object-oriented developers, system analysts, and designers will have the guidance they need to organize and focus their work, create rich and useful domain models, and leverage those models into quality, long-lasting software implementations.




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In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.4 von 5 Sternen
4.4 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
25 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Auf dieses Buch hat man lange gewartet 11. Februar 2007
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Es gibt viele Bücher, die von Objektorientierung schreiben, hier aber ist das erste, das sich dem Kern der OO widmet. Dies ist kein Technikbuch, es werden keine Hypes beschrieben - dieses Buch hätte so schon fünfzehn Jahre früher geschrieben werden können: Es geht "einfach" darum, die Fachlichkeit 1:1 in einem Software-Modell - dem Domain-Model - abzubilden.

Das Thema ist nicht leicht, nicht umsonst hat sich bisher kein Autor an das Thema gewagt. Doch dem Autor gelingt es, dass der Leser das echte OO-Gefühl entwickeln kann.

Hier mein Lob:

- Der Autor hat den Mut, sich gegen weitverbreitete Irrtümer zu stellen (z.B. in der Kritik, Systeme nach technischen Gesichtspunkten in Pakete zu unterteilen).

- Er nutzt gute Beispiele: Nicht trivial, um den Vorteil des Domain-Driven-Design aufzuzeigen. Aber auch nicht zu komplex, sie sind jederzeit ad hoc zu verstehen.

- Er spricht explizit Fehler an, die er auch selbst gemacht hat.

Nun zu meinem Tadel:

- Er nutzt einen zu blumigen Stil, wiederholt sich oft. Das Gleiche hätte man auch mit ein Drittel an Seiten sagen können.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
18 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Das Buch füllt eine relevante Lücke 3. März 2004
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Das Buch beschäftigt sich mit der fachlichen Modellierung objektorientierter Systeme und der Autor vertritt deutlich die Ansicht, dass der Systemkern durch die fachlichen Modelle getrieben sein soll. Damit die fachliche Modellierung gelingt, ist eine gemeinsame und eindeutige Sprache der Projektbeteiligten von Nöten.
Dieser generelle Ansatz wird dann ausgearbeitet, indem die Bausteine für fachliche Modellierung in Pattern-Form präsentiert werden. Durch die Pattern-Form ist selektives Lesen möglich.
Im Buch werden immer mal wieder Bezüge zu agilen Vorgehensweisen hergestellt. Das Buch dürfte aber genausogut in nicht-agilen Projekten funktionieren.
Das Buch hat für jede Könnensstufe etwas zu bieten und schließt eine ganz deutliche Lücke in der Literaturlandschaft.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Teils genial (& stellenweise langatmig) 13. Dezember 2007
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Dieses Buch gehört für mich zu den "Klassikern" - weil Evans als erster Autor die Kluft zwischen Analyse und Architektur/Implementierung mal gründlich und systematisch bearbeitet!

Seine "Building Blocks of Domain Driven Design" (Entities, Services, Repositories, Factories etc.) zeigen endlich mal einen systematischen Weg von fachlichen zu technischen Klassenmodellen auf - sehr lesenswert!

Leider fällt der zweite Teil des Buches doch sehr ab - da wird der Stoff anekdotenhaft und teilweise zusammenhanglos. Diese Hälfte hätte Evans besser schreiben können (da springt dann Jimmy Nilson mit seinen DDD-Patterns in die Bresche!)

Meine Bewertung bezieht sich NUR auf die erste Hälfte des Buches - die bekommt "MaxNrOfPoints".

Fazit und vergleichbare Bücher: Die frei verfügbare Kurzfassung von A. Avram von infoQ ist ein allzu stark gekürzter Abklatsch der (faszinierenden) Thematik - aber zum ersten Einstieg reicht es sicherlich aus. Wer modelliert, sollte das Original lesen.

Wie gesagt - Jimmy Nilson und seine DDD-Patterns, die sind auch für nicht-.NET'ler gut verständlich.
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23 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Damit Software soft bleibt ... 14. November 2003
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Metapher war die wohl am stärksten unterdokumentierte XP-Technik. Nun gibts ein ganzes Buch dazu: Eric Evans beschreibt, wie ein XP-Team sein gemeinsames Vokabular findet, daraus ein mächtiges Domänenmodell entwickelt und dann beide eng miteinander verzahnt einem fortwährenden Refactoring unterwirft. Das Ziel: Die Sprache im Team (Kunden miteingeschlossen), als auch Code und Design werden zunehmend ausdruckskräftiger, die Komplexität sinkt und Anforderungen werden leichter kommunizierbar und testbar.
Teilweise wirkt mir das Buch etwas langatmig, da in Patterns-Form à la Christopher Alexander aufgeschrieben. Trotzdem für mich das Buch des Jahres. Mit Hang zum Klassiker.
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