Divided Memory: Nazi Past in the Two Germanys und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr

Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 0,56 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von Divided Memory: Nazi Past in the Two Germanys auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Jeffrey Herf


Erhältlich bei diesen Anbietern.


Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 13,33  
Gebundene Ausgabe --  
Taschenbuch --  

Kurzbeschreibung

31. März 1999
What has Germany made of its Nazi past? A significant new look at the legacy of the Nazi regime, this book exposes the workings of past beliefs and political interests on how-and how differently-the two Germanys have recalled the crimes of Nazism, from the anti-Nazi emigration of the 1930s through the establishment of a day of remembrance for the victims of National Socialism in 1996. Why, Jeffrey Herf asks, would German politicians raise the specter of the Holocaust at all, in view of the considerable depth and breadth of support its authors and their agenda had found in Nazi Germany? Why did the public memory of Nazi anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust emerge, if selectively, in West Germany, yet was repressed and marginalized in "anti-fascist" East Germany? And how do the politics of left and right come into play in this divided memory? The answers reveal the surprising relationship between how the crimes of Nazism were publicly recalled and how East and West Germany separately evolved a Communist dictatorship and a liberal democracy. This book, for the first time, points to the impact of the Cold War confrontation in both West and East Germany on the public memory of anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust. Konrad Adenauer, Theodor Heuss, Kurt Schumacher, Willy Brandt, Richard von Weizsacker, and Helmut Kohl in the West and Walter Ulbricht, Wilhelm Pieck, Otto Grotewohl, Paul Merker, and Erich Honnecker in the East are among the many national figures whose private and public papers and statements Herf examines. His work makes the German memory of Nazism-suppressed on the one hand and selective on the other, from Nuremberg to Bitburg-comprehensible within the historical context of the ideologies and experiences of pre-1945 German and European history as well as within the international context of shifting alliances from World War II to the Cold War. Drawing on West German and recently opened East German

Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Divides Memory" demonstrates how German politicians at the highest levels have dealt with the legacy of Nazi Germany since 1945. One of the book's many unique contributions is the manner in which it both weaves together, and draws clear distinctions between, the approaches taken by such disparate politicians as Konrad Adenauer, Walter Ulbricht, Paul Merker, and Theodor Heuss, to mention just a few...["Divided Memory"] is a classic: clearly and engagingly written, based on wide-ranging research and the author's sure sense of the political winds of post-1945 Germany, "Divided Memory" lays bare the bewildering task of reconciling memory and politics in Germany, or anywhere else, for that matter.--Daniel E. Rogers "German Studies Review "

Synopsis

What has Germany made of its Nazi past? This book explores the legacy of the Nazi regime, exposing the workings of past beliefs and political interests and how differently the two Germanys have recalled the crimes of Nazism, from the anti-Nazi emigration of the 1930s through the establishment of a day of remembrance for the victims of National Socialism in 1996. The author asks why would German politicians raise the spectre of the Holocaust at all, in view of the considerable depth of support its instigators and their agenda had found in Nazi Germany. Why did the public memory of Nazi anti-Jewish persecution and the Holocaust emerge, if selectively, in West Germany, yet was repressed and marginalized in "anti-fascist" East Germany? The book aims to answer this question and more, revealing the relationship between how the crimes of Nazism were publicly recalled and how East and West Germany separately evolved a Communist dictatorship and a liberal democracy.

The author uses private and public papers and statements of key German figures to explore the subject and to place it within its historical context and the ideologies and experiences of pre-1945 German and European history to the Cold War.


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.2 von 5 Sternen  4 Rezensionen
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Useful work on an under-explored topic 16. Juli 2005
Von James V. Holton - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
A previous view has mischaracterized this work as one that deals with attitudes toward Israel.

The primary purpose of this book is the role of the Holocaust in memory among the respective West and East German elites following World War II. It is not a broader work on social history, which one could argue needs to be done, but criticizing someone for the book he didn't write is misplaced.

Herff's arguments center around the coming to grips with the Holocaust in politics in the two German states. He asserts, correctly, that East German leaders chose to adopt the Marxist line that WWII was a fascist war, and the Holocaust a product of fascism rather than racism. The leaders did so in order to portray the installed Stalinist state as the legitimate government in eastern Germany and being utterly disconnected from the Nazis. The result was a whitewashing of historical memory, portraying Jews and other minorities as virtual martyrs of the East German state.

Herff further argues, and places blame, on West German leaders for failing to engage the Holocaust. However, he points out that Karl Adenauers efforts to engage conservatives on this issue was a forward-thinking move, and ultimately salvaged West Germany on this issue.

Ultimately, the issue of the two Germanys and Israel has to do with the evolution of historical memory rather than philo-semitism or philo-nazism.

This book will be useful for those seeking to understand the role of memory in WWII and the Cold War.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen substantial contribution to our understanding of post-war memory, manipulation of Holocaust 3. November 2011
Von Alessandro - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I'm really surprised there are only 3 reviews, so I thought I'd add a few words. The earlier, negative post is not entirely fair to Herf; I'd agree that Herf uses Israel as a litmus test, but not as exclusively or prominently as the earlier "customer review" asserted. For the most part, this is an extremely valuable, well-researched examination of the use/misuse of the Holocaust on both sides of the Berlin Wall during the Cold War (and beyond). It's justly considered a classic by scholars who work on these issues. In more recent years, Herf's work has become tainted by his political agenda (pro-"war on terror"), which perhaps was on the mind of the previous reviewer. But "Divided Memory" was published before this transformation in the author's perspective and agenda, and remains indispensable.
3 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Lopsided but still useful 27. Januar 2010
Von R. L. Huff - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Professor Herf's attempt to deal with the memory of Nazism in the former halves of Germany gives too much whitewash to the West and lays too much tar on the East. The underlying theme seems to be which half did most to support Israel in the cold war, than who actually came to grips with the legacy of Nazism in postwar Germany.

Herf would have us believe that Adenauer opened the door to reparations and reconsiliation in West Germany; yet by Herf's own description Adenauer weathered the Nazi regime pretty well, protected by his fellow conservatives who actually ran the Nazi state on a daily basis after 1934. At no time did he speak out against Nazi barbarities in Germany or abroad. These favors were reciprocated when ex-Nazis needed peace and shelter after the war and found it under his wing. Adenauer came into brief conflict with Nazidom only after 20 July 1944, when like many nationalists he tried saving the German state from Hitler's sinking ship. The postwar public honors for the executed military conspirators proved no barrier to rehabiliating their executioners as a condition for creating the Bundeswehr. Chancellor Kohl's subsequent disgraceful performance at Bitburg, in a rising tide of nationalist self-justification, shows that it was the West's anti-establishment critics who truly pushed the Holocaust issue forward in West German public life.

The East was deserving of criticism also, as anti-Zionism was a back door through which some former Nazis could find a nest in the "anti-fascist state." But conflating the GDR's anti-Israel policy with attitudes to the Holocaust slights the fact that most unrepentant ex-Nazis, blood on their hands or not, found their most congenial shelter in the West, to resume their business and professional careers unruffled by de-Nazification. The West's "coming to terms with the Nazi legacy" had more to do with American influence and cold war alliances and the rise of Holocaust consciousness in the general western consensus than any true coming to grips with the roots of Nazism in German society.

While this work does have useful information on postwar German society, its loaded emphasis on the failings of the East, and its willingness to buy West German public pieties at face value, marks it as a work of the cold war era than of post-Nazi memory.
6 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Simplistic and simply wrong 2. November 2004
Von epreuss - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Herf applies a very simplistic test to determine the Nazification of both Germanies: did they side with Israel in the Middle East version of the Cold War or did they not? The trial against Paul Merker in the East, which had as its background East Germany's reluctance to pay reparations to expropriated Jews, serves as his prime evidence for the continuation of things Nazi in the GDR. But both of these arguments completely ignore the Marxist ideology underlieing the rationale of the East German leadership and bypass more complicated issues of political allegiance. Moreover, they totally eclipse the East German cultural discourse on the Holocaust, a discourse that was decades ahead of discussions in the West and still proves to be more sophisticated than most that is being written in Western academia.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar