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Dirty Love (Englisch) Audio-CD – Audiobook, 10. Juni 2014


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Audio-CD, Audiobook, 10. Juni 2014
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-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.
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[N]obody does quiet desperation better than Dubus. " -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

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The number one The New York Times best-selling author, Andre Dubus III is the recipient of many honours, including a Guggenheim Fellowship. Also available: the "riveting and poignant" (Financial Times), "most sensitive - and gripping - account of male violence imaginable" (Robert Collins, The Sunday Times, Christmas Round-Up 2011), Townie (ISBN 978 0 393 34067 9). -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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19 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Stories of People Who Want More From Life Than They Have 21. Oktober 2013
Von Bonnie Brody - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Andre Dubus III has delivered an uncompromising book of short stories, though the title story is more like a novella. They are about hope and disillusion along with the human condition of wanting what is often out of reach.

'Listen Carefully as Our Options Have Changed' is about a man who finds out that his wife of almost 25 years has been cheating on him. She has been having an affair and is in love with her lover. It appears that all the husband's ideas about the quality of his marriage go up in smoke, at least from his wife's perspective.

'Marla' has always been a lonely, overweight girl. She's grown up to be a lonely, overweight woman who works as a teller in a bank. When she meets Dennis she is 29 years old and still a virgin. She is hopeful about their relationship but ends up feeling just as lonely and alone with him as she had felt prior to meeting him.

In 'The Bartender', Robert Doucette is a bartender and a would-be poet who marries Althea who is pregnant. He has been unable to follow through on anything in his life and commences to be unfaithful to Althea early on in their marriage.

Devon is the protagonist of 'Dirty Love'. She has come to live with her great-uncle Francis after having pictures of herself in a compromising position posted on the internet. She is trying to start anew. "She'd come to live with Francis to start clean. But how can anyone ever be clean with family? Blood is too dirty, dirty with love that can so easily turn to hate." She has also met, through Skype, a veteran soldier with whom she is having a relationship. When her father comes to visit Francis and tells him about Devon's past, her world is shattered.

Characters from one story sometimes appear in another but the stories are not really interconnected in any meaningful way. They are peopled with characters who feel like they have lost out, who want to be more than they are and can't find the right road to achieve this. It is very well-written and the stories stay with the reader.
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A Great Book 18. Oktober 2013
Von Stephen Weiner - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Dubus is a master at depicting complicated people in distress & in this book he moves away from one of his themes; how money (or lack of) profoundly influences their choices. Money isn't an issue for these people, their lives are, & mostly they're in disappointing places. But for Dubus every day is a new beginning & as each of these loosely connected stories resolve there is a door that each character opens even if he's afraid to. Dubus tells us that there are no bad guys: he describes infidelity as a virus that affects some marriages & not others & he's not afraid to take on the pose so many artists assume when trying to impress the opposite sex. A brutal & soft book, probably the best "literary" fiction I've read this year.
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The title gets it about right 20. Januar 2014
Von sas - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
First of all, Dubus is a really good writer, comparable to John Updike; I enjoy his descriptions which carry the reader along seamlessly into the world he is creating. Unlike Updike, however, at least in this collection of stories, Dubus is unsuccessful at presenting us with a single character we can empathize with. While all of the main characters suffer immensely, do stupid things and are victims of their many inner weaknesses,none was even remotely likable with the possible exception of Francis in the last story in the collection. Updike succeeded so well because he made the reader identify with his [often] disreputable characters and thus sympathize and have compassion for them. Dubus does not succeed in this. While the many sex scenes Updike crafted in his novels and stories engaged the reader, Dubus' many sex scenes turn mostly on the word "thrust"; with Updike you like being a voyeur,with Dubus, you want to turn away. Especially the last story, "Dirty Love", this reader found little but vulgarity, crudity and even, sadly, creepiness. I closed the book feeling, well, dirty.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Brutally honest and tenderly revealing 15. November 2013
Von Bookreporter - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Although only two years have passed since the publication of Andre Dubus III’s searing memoir, TOWNIE, it’s been five years since he’s produced a work of fiction. In HOUSE OF SAND AND FOG, he portrayed a tragic clash between Iranian immigrants and American culture. THE GARDEN OF LAST DAYS imagined the days leading up to the 9/11 attacks, in part through the hijackers’ eyes. In the four loosely linked novellas of DIRTY LOVE, Dubus has shifted his attention from stories rooted in contemporary conflicts to pay a visit to the battleground between men and women, a subject that provided much of the inspiration for his late father’s outstanding short fiction. In doing that, he has delivered a book that is as brutally honest and tenderly revealing of the state of that timeless conflict as anything written today.

The title, and lengthiest, story features two protagonists at the opposite ends of life. Eighteen-year-old Devon Brandt has fled the tension of a home where her philandering father has betrayed her mother with a much younger woman. Devon has gone to live with her 81-year-old great uncle, Francis, who recognizes the young woman has “jumped overboard and swam to this half-empty old boat she somehow assumed is stable.” A widower and a retired teacher, he is haunted by regret over the alcholism that shadowed his lengthy, childless marriage. Dubus does a masterly job portraying the affinity between the old man and his grand niece, as he encourages her to study for her GED while buffering her frayed relationship with her father. Devon has her own profound regrets, spawned by an embarrassing Internet video and a failed relationship. In making us feel the genuine tenderness that exists between these two characters across the gap of more than six decades, Dubus is fully equal to his task.

In “Listen Carefully as Our Options Have Changed,” Mark Welch, a successful project manager in his mid-50s, discovers that his wife of 25 years has embarked on an affair (and he has the video evidence to prove it). Bewildered by her infidelity, the “manager of the Welch team” sets out on what he thinks of as the “project of saving his marriage,” though he quickly discovers that his businesslike approach, structured around analyzing “opportunities and threats” has little purchase in the realm of the heart. There are scenes of scarifying conflict here, and the story is charged with the looming threat of violence on nearly every page.

Robert Doucette, the bartender in the story of that title, fancies himself a “man of true romance and high calling,” based chiefly, it seems, on the fitful stabs he makes at writing poetry, though he “just hadn’t put it all down on paper yet.” He falls quickly in love and marries a younger woman, Althea, but, almost predictably, forsakes his vows to take up with one of the waitresses at the Whaler Restaurant, Bar & Hotel, the downmarket seaside New Hampshire establishment that appears in three of the stories. For Dubus, ill-considered actions always have consequences, and the dramatic ones that flow from Robert’s adultery allow him to contemplate a path out of his pathetic self-absorption.

“Marla” suffers by comparison to the other novellas. The title character is a modestly overweight virgin, a 29-year-old bank teller who feels like she’s “turning into one of those rare women who had completely missed the train everyone else had gotten on.” When Dennis, a burly, bearded radio-frequency engineer who’s a customer at the bank, asks her out, their relationship soon flourishes. But its bloom wilts almost as fast, as Marla discovers unappealing aspects of her lover’s personality, from his compulsive cleanliness to his attitude toward children. As her focus of their relationship sharpens, she has to decide whether to reject him or to accept that “for all Dennis was not, for all she didn’t feel for him, he was better than a lifetime of nobody.”

Though Dubus’s characters are capable of starkly selfish acts, he presents them without judgment. None of the stories has a conventional happy ending, but each at least hints at the possibility of redemption. They’re constructed with the sturdiness of well-made furniture, though every so often Dubus throws a punch that lands squarely in the gut, as, for example, when he describes Mark Welch’s house on the morning after he confronts his wife about her affair, summoning up a place where “the smell of dried blood was in the air and great devastation of some kind had happened nearby.” It would be tempting to believe from these stories that faithlessness is the predominant characteristic in the relations between men and women, but Dubus helps us appreciate the truth that, most of the time, we somehow succeed in living peacefully and happily together.

- Harvey Freedenberg
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Love cannot be blind (4.25*s) 26. Dezember 2013
Von J. Grattan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
In this collection of four unsettling, gripping stories, the author makes pretty clear that human weaknesses, the absence of communications, unmet or unrealistic expectations, etc can make marriages extremely difficult to maintain. Of course, none of this is seen initially, but these shortcomings inevitably work to erode many marriages. In addition, in the title story, “Dirty Love,” the widespread use of smartphones by teenagers is examined, especially the reckless sending of private, compromising information.

In one story, a fifty-something software project manager comes to find out that his wife of twenty-five years is paying special attention to him because she is having an affair. In another, a girl nearing thirty is bowled over by a very attentive man, only to discover that his perfectionist tendencies prevent her from feeling free to be herself. In a third story, a bartender, who fancies himself as a poet, is mesmerized by a girl with “black eyes of hope,” who he promptly marries. Unfortunately, he permits himself to be distracted by another woman while his new wife is pregnant.

In the most transfixing story, eighteen-year-old Devon desperately asks her elderly uncle for a place to live. Raised in a dysfunctional family, she, in seeking a safe haven with a rather dubious school crowd, feels pressured into sexual experimentation. Regrettably, she falls victim to the meanness of teenagers when a video of her is posted online. Interestingly, despite the injury that she has suffered on the Internet, after moving in with her uncle, she continues to go online to meet more desirable friends/guys.

The tone of the book is not one of hopelessness. The characters exhibit a certain amount of self-awareness regarding the situations in which they find themselves. The question in all of these stories is whether there are still possibilities for turning around these situations that have taken such dramatically bad turns. In addition, the stories are also cautionary; it is far better to foresee pending problems than it is to fix them later
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