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Dinner with Lenny: The Last Long Interview with Leonard Bernstein [Kindle Edition]

Jonathan Cott

Kindle-Preis: EUR 12,47 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

The interview is replete with a generous helping of the boast and bombast which was Bernstein's stock-in-trade, which one either loves or hates ... The account makes riveting reading. Classical Music Rarely has a composer or conductor enjoyed such public adulation, and this lovely little book goes some way towards explaining why Bernstein did. A transcription of the "last long interview" with him, conducted in the year before his death, it captures Bernstein on sparkling form... Dinner with Lenny is an evocative tribute, not just to Bernstein's musical gifts but his ever-active mind. The Financial Times [In Dinner with Lenny] ancedotes flow freely as the casual obscenities and gushing Yiddish emoting. The most telling quip comes in Cott's perceptive introduction: just before a concert at the Vatican, followed by an audience with the Pope, a well-wishing friend sent Bernstein a telegram: 'Remember: the ring, not the lips.' The Spectator Jonathan Cott is gifted at making a discussion - presented in the formatting of a play script, with occasional stage directions - feel like a live recording, while we wander from fascinating reflections about languages, the mystic number seven, and Hitler's effect on 20th-century music, to lovely anecdotes such as the one about Bernstein's late wife washing the eccentric Glenn Gould's hair. The Independent on Sunday Lenny is witty, erudite, epigrammatic and wicked - filled with off-the cuff reminiscences about friends, colleagues and reflection on major composers. The Times What Cott has achieved, though this final interview, is to make Lenny speak and sing again. It's been said that if you remember an evening with Lenny, you weren't really there. The genius of Cott's book is not only to remember but to recall with pinpoint accuracy and sympathy the flame of Leonard Bernstein that burned so brightly and so true. New Statesman A feast New York Times I found this terrific book quite impossible to put down ... Here is a vibrant and authentic Leonard Bernstein, speaking freely, frankly and extremely entertainingly, but never wavering in his raging passion for music, or his simple lust for life. International Record Review

Kurzbeschreibung

Leonard Bernstein was arguably the most highly esteemed, influential, and charismatic American classical music personality of the twentieth century. Conductor, composer, pianist, writer, educator, and human rights activist, Bernstein truly led a life of Byronic intensity--passionate, risk-taking, and convention-breaking.
In November 1989, just a year before his death, Bernstein invited writer Jonathan Cott to his country home in Fairfield, Connecticut for what turned out to be his last major interview--an unprecedented and astonishingly frank twelve-hour conversation. Now, in Dinner with Lenny, Cott provides a complete account of this remarkable dialogue in which Bernstein discourses with disarming frankness, humor, and intensity on matters musical, pedagogical, political, psychological, spiritual, and the unabashedly personal. Bernstein comes alive again, with vodka glass in hand, singing, humming, and making pointed comments on a wide array of topics, from popular music ("the Beatles were the best songwriters since Gershwin"), to great composers ("Wagner was always in a psychotic frenzy. He was a madman, a megalomaniac"), and politics (lamenting "the brainlessness, the mindlessness, the carelessness, and the heedlessness of the Reagans of the world"). And of course, Bernstein talks of conducting, advising students "to look at the score and make it come alive as if they were the composer. If you can do that, you're a conductorand if you can't, you're not. If I don't become Brahms or Tchaikovsky or Stravinsky when I'm conducting their works, then it won't be a great performance."
After Rolling Stone magazine published an abridged version of the conversation in 1990, the Chicago Tribune praised it as "an extraordinary interview" filled with "passion, wit, and acute analysis." Studs Terkel called the interview "astonishing and revelatory." Now, this full-length version provides the reader with a unique, you-are-there perspective on what it was like to converse with this gregarious, witty, candid, and inspiring American dynamo.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 7445 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 192 Seiten
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press, USA (7. Dezember 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00AFVDV6O
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #155.277 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  98 Rezensionen
24 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "And then this white butterfly flew in from God knows where" 5. November 2012
Von H. F. Corbin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
In this Leonard Bernstein's last interview, he tells Jonathan Cott that there are some things he is not going to talk about: he does not have favorite orchestras, favorite composers, favorite symphonies, favorite kinds of food, favorite forms of sex. The rest of the world is fair game. Then in an interview that goes for several hours, he proceeds to talk about everything: his views on music-- composers, his recordings, performers-- the list is endless-- are just a small part of his domain. Politics, presidents, religion, you name it.

This interview should be required reading for lovers of music as well as anyone who takes pleasure in seeing the mind of a genius at work. Here are some of my favorite of his comments/opinions. Richard Nixon was the greatest crook of all time. During the Reagan years, "we had eight lovely, passive, on-our-backs, status quo, don't make-waves years." The most exciting thing that has happened in Bernstein's lifetime is the fall of the Berlin Wall. "Unless you have an enemy, there's no way to live. We must have a war economy or we have no economy."

We must have active rather than passive listeners of music. Bernstein tells of the composer Virgil Thomson falling asleep and snoring audibly during a performance and then writing a review of-- what he didn't hear I suppose-- the next day.

Finally in what has to be the most moving section of the interview Mr. Bernstein gives his views on life after death, saying that the "you-ness goes on. I will swear that Felicia [his deceased wife] is with me a lot. . . though not in her shape. I am frequently visited by a white moth or a white butterfly. . . And I know it's Felicia. I remember that when she died, her coffin was in our living room in East Hampton. . .and just a few of us were there. . . Everyone was absolutely silent. And then this white butterfly flew in from God knows where--it just appeared from under the coffin and flew around, alighting on everybody in the room--on each of the children, on the rabbi, on the priest, on her brother-in-law and two of her sisters, on me. . . and then it was gone. . . through there was nothing open."

It is worth reading this interview for the above paragraph alone.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Narcissism and Charm 8. Dezember 2012
Von Jeremy Storly - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
There are few who would dispute that Leonard Bernstein was one of the twentieth century's greatest composers and conductors. There are even fewer who would dispute his influence on modern classical music. Perhaps this gave him the right to a touch of the narcissistic persuasion, and certainly it is present here, in a delightful way. Jonathan Cott leaps at the opportunity to interview this great icon. The interviewer fawns over his idol, and Bernstein does not disappoint. In this interview, he is everything from the free-love guru to the well-versed poet to the Zen master, and we are treated to his reflections over past performances as often as we are treated to his musings over philosophy and politics.

A great part of the interview is devoted to Mahler (of course), and this is fitting since Bernstein was enamored of Mahler, even being buried with a copy of Mahler's 5th Symphony on his breast. Here Bernstein offers food for thought for even the most unschooled of listeners, and even as one who is no expert in Mahler, I found his reflections and interpretations compelling. (There is a compelling performance of Mahler's Fifth on Youtube, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.)

Bernstein was nothing if not opinionated, and as a teacher, I especially found his educational philosophy appealing. Bernstein was interested in the democratization of classical music, making it accessible to all, and seemed to hold a special interest in educating the underprivileged. I have no doubt that, were Bernstein alive today, he would smile at the notion of inner-city youth invited to fill the empty seats of the Minnesota Orchestra Hall (conducted by Osmo Vänskä, renowned for his interpretations of Beethoven), or poor Midwesterners invited to experience a superb performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra (my own introduction to the world of classical music.)

This book is but a brief taste of the richness of a great composer, but its brevity lends to its digestibility. Cott interviews Bernstein for twelve hours, and when he requests one more question at two-thirty in the morning, Bernstein responds with, "You're sure it's just one more?" Bernstein senses the end of the interview just as the reader senses the end of the book. Like a Christmas pudding, the book is best as a small portion. Thankfully, Cott realizes this, and the end result is a readable, enriching interview with one whose name will be remembered as a great conductor and composer. Long live the memory of Leonard Bernstein.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Short, But, Oh My! 25. Oktober 2012
Von JPfromOH - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
A truncated version of Jonathan Cott's multi-hour-length 1989 interview with American icon, composer, conductor, media personality, and political activist Leonard Bernstein appeared in Rolling Stone magazine the year of Bernstein's death. Dinner with Lenny includes the complete over-dinner-and-drinks interview. Cott contextualizes the interview by including extensive material on Bernstein's life and importance as a musical icon before the interview transcript itself, as well as a "Postlude" that tells the story of Bernstein's quick slide into the ravages of cancer and death. Cott and Bernstein discuss a wide variety of topics, including the conductor's work, his view of major composers of his time and from throughout history, Bernstein's assessment of 1980s rock music versus the classic rock of the 1960s (hint/spoiler: Bernstein continued right up to the end to praise the pop songwriters of the sixties and had little positive to say about the eighties). Religion, politics, psychology, sociology, the arts as the reflection of the inner struggle of the artist, the natural inclination of human beings to play, and a whole lot more are part of this fascinating and passionate discussion. A must-read book for any musician, music teacher, or reader interested in the multitude of roles of music in society.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Everybody Loves Lenny 10. November 2012
Von David Seaman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
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Jonathan Cott has made a name for himself as a writer, both with The New York Times and The New Yorker. In addition he's the author of many books, mostly non-fiction. He is a student of music and a serious one; Cott knows his stuff, he can speak intelligently about both music theory and music history and as such, who better to interview Leonard Bernstein?

"Dinner With Lenny" is a long time coming. Originally, Jon Cott was assigned an 8,000 word interview by Rolling Stone Magazine to interview Leonard Bernstein in November of 1989. At that time, no one knew that Cott's interview would be the last. Bernstein was a renowned chain smoker, a liberal drinker and a man who lived a fast energetic life and though common sense said that Bernstein would not live to be as old as Irving Berlin, somehow the man seemed to be as energetic in 1990 as he was in 1935. This energy is captured on the pages of this wonderful new book. Every detail of the twelve hours spent at Bernstein's Connecticut home is documented here so that you feel as though you are there with them.

This is a wonderful read; not a long one, but for many people it's a repeat read: this is not just an interview but a book of philosophy, a book about how to raise children and a book about how to live, love and laugh. There is a Kikuyu saying that when a man dies he takes a library with him. And so is the case with Leonard Bernstein. We must treasure everything he left behind.

Before we go too far into this, it must be clarified that Bernstein rhymes with Burn Mine. This was a serious issue with Leonard Bernstein as many people pronounced it Burn-steen. (in a song Stephen Sondheim wrote for Lenny's 70th birthday, he used his rhyming skills and puzzle skills to make a joke of this. That lyric can be found in Sondheim's "Look, I Made A Hat.")

The first third of Bernstein's brilliance is focused a great deal on children and very young children at that. This makes this book an important document for new parents. The innateness of music in the development of children is critical in allowing them to ease through life transitions. Lenny understands the innate principles in music, art and -subsequently- the baby. Furthermore he had a brilliant grasp of how to ease children through natural traumas of childhood and move toward inner peace. For new parents, this book is critical.

Secondly, anyone who is a Mahler fan or a Mahler hater (there IS no in between) will get a lot more out of this book than someone who doesn't know Mahler. And those who know Mahler and do not care for him will find less in the book- though I by no means discourage the Mahler hater to pass over this book. Bernstein attempted to get into Jonathan Cott's head a great deal; it is a boon to the reader to take the questions Lenny asked of Mr Cott and ponder them for oneself. It is very clear that Mr. Bernstein was entertaining himself at Mr. Cott's expense that day, flexing his mental skills.

Bernstein was a wise man and a brilliant man- two different things. He was verbose, flamboyant and full of love and all of these things come out in this interview and book. I met Bernstein once in the early 80's. As a college pianist at the Berklee College of Music I was hired by Boston Conservatory to play piano for their production of Bernstein's "Mass." This is a highly controversial piece of music for reasons that Bernstein explains in this book. The piece is very difficult (which is why, I hate to say, that the orchestra was comprised largely of Berklee Students.) Bernstein arrived at the first dress rehearsal in a fur coat, patched with different pelts, a pair of jeans high end loafers, no socks while carrying four packs of cigarettes and a flask to appear later. After her was placated by every faculty member in the theatre he took his place to my left at the piano. I mentioned how I preferred a page turner to be to my right and twenty minutes later he told me it was because I failed to utilize the entire stretch of the keyboard. Within two hours, his analysis of me had brought us to the piano on which I learned where most of the notes in the octave above middle C were broken, coupled with my passion for Billy Joel and Beethoven's heavy use of left hand. He refused to move and my introduction to centering myself at middle C would have been better with a less difficult score (Cabaret, South Pacific, Sweet Charity, Funny Girl) but I moved on, catching cues, following singers, accommodating an on sight transposition (for which he said, "good job" with raised eyebrows) dropping beats, adding safety's and making the cast look better than they were while we talked almost constantly. (There was no conductor- I conducted with head cues from the piano and there were only nine of us in the pit.) I learned more in that four hours than in any class I ever took undergrad or grad school. His skill as a teacher of philosophy was as great as his skill as a teacher of music theory. I politely declined, three times over, to join him for a late dinner at his suite at the Sheraton Boston hotel and instead returned to my dorm room, one block closer, at Berklee. I was never certain if his interest in me was as a musician, a nineteen year old boy or an intelligent open mind. If I had to guess, I'd say all three. Everything that I've discussed regarding my own experience comes out in Mr Cott's book with the exception of Mr Cott not being an attractive 19 year old boy.) When Leonard Bernstein died in 1990 I was teaching music for a public school and had to shut my office door to weep in private. Two weeks later, WBUR played a suite from "On The Waterfront" and I cried again.

Jonathan Cott's book brought all of that back to me. I want you all to read this so that you can share what I had. We didn't have dinner, as Cott did (wasted on the vegetarian) but we shared some single malt scotch from his flask, my share poured into my empty cup from Steve's House of Donuts on Boylston street. Bernstein inspired me that day. He inspired me again with "Dinner With Lenny". I hold strong grudges against many of the anti-Semitic composers: Beethoven, Mahler, Wagner (I will not play or listen to Wagner, having read all of his essays including those regarding the "Final Solution" of the Jewish Problems.) Bernstein changed a lyric in Beethoven's Symphony 9 (Freude became Freedom) perhaps to soothe his own issues but I do not need Beethoven or Mahler or Wagner, I have Bernstein, Copland, Randall Thompson, Stephen Sondheim and Adam Guettel. Let Bernstein's recordings of the 9th century be definitive; they sincerely are for the man's passion about life and love, which spilled from the tape recorder of Jonathan Cott onto the pages of "Dinner With Lenny". I left a job interview four yearws later after having answered the question of why I did not conduct using a straight four beat pattern. Years after tendonitis kept my left hand in my pocket and I leanred to conduct with my eyes or a nod and I saw then what Bernstein had learned long before me: the musicians will look for direction, they will transform the passion that you show them and it DOES make a difference in the muysic. Compare recordings of Neville Schuette conducting Samuel Barber's "Adagio For Strings" to Bernstein. It will dispel anything anyone may have told you about Bernstein "showing off" on the podium. After all, many of his recordings didn't show him conducting and absolutely none of his performances showed his front side to his audience. I'm tired of listening to people grouse about this issue.

If Leonard Bernstein brought that much to me in four hours, and this much to Jonathan Cott in twelve hours, I strongly suggest that you buy this book and read it several times over. The man was not just a musician; he was a lover of life. And we need him and this book now more than ever before.

I wish there were more than five stars. Thank you, Jonathan Cott. Thanks Lenny.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sheer enchantment & learning! 1. November 2012
Von Chris Finklein - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
It was impossible to put this down so, as a result, I read the entire tale in one sitting. Talk about a story reaching back in time to delve into the mind and heart of such a genius as Bernstein!

As a child I grew up with his television teaching concerts and read anything I could get my hands on about him to learn more. His music for "West Side Story" became the soundtrack of my teenage years and still evokes emotions like few other memories from my past. My love and study of the piano were highly influenced with the simple mention of his name because it seemed to me we believed the same tennants. Just as he could do nothing without music, nor could I. I read, studied, did dishes, cleaned house, played, performed yard work chores all with music behind the scenes and those were the days long before the ear-inserting methods of today. I was completely unable to perform any task without music ringing in my ears for fuel.

This book captures the essence of Leonard Bernstein with conversations about incidental and monumental subjects that cover the spectrum of music making, composition and various composers of worth who fashioned his worlds of music. That he was a genius whose greatest contribution was in teaching goes without saying. We are fortunate that many of his recordings exist to leave imprints of his immortality for those who never lived to hear him live will grow to cherish. The exchanges reveal a gifted individual larger than life but whose humanity vividly leaked thru the lines and left the reader a tangible hint of his realness.

I am blown away with his genius, how his talents touched my life because of his unique abilities. There is no one like him on the scene today with his methods or impact. He left such an imprint on my study of the piano that any time I can feel closer to him I feel his touch still very alive and informatively penetrating.

It's like I was there, a fly on the wall, invited into the room to swallow his melodies and interpretations and taste his instincts that have left his mark on the musical world forever. What a tantalizing TREAT!
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