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Digital Capitalism: Networking the Global Market System [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Dan Schiller , Daniel Schiller

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

One of the great early claims of cyberculture was that the Net constituted a realm distinct from the "real world," with a life and laws all its own. This book argues strongly to the contrary. Not only is cyberspace an integral part of the real world, Dan Schiller insists, but it exists primarily to serve powerful real-world economic interests--none of which are necessarily aligned with the principles of individual freedom and equal access commonly touted as the Internet's defining values.

In Schiller's reckoning, it was neither Al Gore, the Pentagon bureaucracy, nor a subculture of long-haired hackers that brought digital networks into being. Rather, it was large corporations in the '40s and '50s that were looking to expand operations across national borders. Through big business's economic demand for sophisticated networking tools, and more importantly, through its direct political demands for deregulated digital telecommunications, these corporate interests carved out the technosocial realm we now know as cyberspace. The Internet thus stands as both symptom and fulcrum of the broader trend toward globalization that is the hallmark of the political economy of the late 20th century.

In Schiller's view, that trend is a decidedly bad thing, and he spends much of the book outlining what he sees as its deleterious effects on economic equality, media culture, and higher education. These are unabashedly anticapitalist sentiments, but whether or not you agree with them, Schiller's account of the relationship between corporations and cyberspace demands to be reckoned with. --Julian Dibbell -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"[P]rovides a useful counterweight to popular expectations about the supposedly democratic impact of the Internet." Harvard Business Review "In Digital Capitalism... Dan Schiller provides a compelling andsobering view of the democratic potential of the Internet. Robert McChesney , Lingua Franca, "Breakthrough Books" "In this welcome antidote to happy high-tech hype, Schiller cutsthrough the false promises of the new cyber age to expose the harshpolitical and economic realities that shape it." David Noble , Division of Social Science, York University

Synopsis

The networks that comprise cyberspace were originally created at the behest of government agencies, military contractors and allied educational institutions. However, recently a growing number of these networks began to serve primarily corporate users. Under the sway of an expansionary market logic, the Internet began a political-economic transition toward what Dan Schiller calls "digital capitalism". Schiller traces these metamorphoses through three critically important and interlinked realms. Parts I and II deal with the overwhelmingly "neoliberal" or market-driven policies that influence and govern the telecommunications system and their empowerment of transnational corporations while at the same time exacerbating existing social inqualities. Part III shows how cyberspace offers uniquely supple instruments with which to cultivate and deepen consumerism on a transnational scale, especially among privileged groups. Part IV shows how digital capitalism has overtaken education, placing it at the mercy of a proprietary market logic.

Der Verlag über das Buch

An important communications perspective on the new e-market.
We've heard a lot about the democratic potential of the Internet and its ability to empower everyone from voters to consumers to activists, students and small businesspeople. Dan Schiller takes a skeptical view of such promises. His sobering new book reveals how fully the Internet already belongs to the greater political economy it is also helping to drive. The networks that comprise cyberspace were created at the behest of government agencies, military contractors, and allied educational institutions. Over the past generation or so, many of these networks have begun to serve primarily corporate users. Under the sway of an espansionary market logic, the Internet has begun a political and economic transition toward what Schiller calls "digital capitalism."

Digital Capitalism takes a critical look at the unfolding political economy of contemporary computer-communications networks. Schiller first describes the overwhelmingly "neoliberal" or market-driven policies that influence tha govern the telecommunications system; such policies, he argues, tend to empower transnational corporations and to exacerbate existing social inequalities. He then shows how cyberspace offers uniquely supple instruments with which to cultivate and deepen consumerism on a global scale, especially among the economically privilieged. Finally, Schiller explains how digital capitalism has already overtaken education, placing it at the mercy of a proprietary market logic.

Dan Schiller is Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego.

"Dan Schiller's DIGITAL CAPITALISM is one of the most important works in communication studies of this generation. It is undoubtedly the single best book on the Internet, and one that should be required reading for all concerned with the future of media and democracy. Schiller masterfully tears down the mythology of th Internet to reveal its close links to the needs and desires of the world's largest corporations and wealthiest investors. Unlike so many observers who regard the Internet as some walled-off preserve that only acts on the world, Schiller integrates digital communication systems into the heart of the global political economy. In so doing, he presents a disarming and troubling picture that deserves our immediate and sustained attention." -Robert W. McChesny, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cahampaign, author, RICH MEDIA, POOR DEMOCRACY: COMMUNICATION POLITICS IN DUBIOUS TIMES -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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