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Cruel Britannia: A Secret History of Torture [Kindle Edition]

Ian Cobain

Kindle-Preis: EUR 7,41 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

The official line is clear: the UK does not 'participate in, solicit, encourage or condone' torture. And yet, the evidence is irrefutable: when it comes to dealing with potential threats to our national security, the gloves always come off. As the enquiries into the on-going abuse of terror suspects uncover an ever more sinister and unpalatable chain of complicity - going right to the top of government - it is time to re-examine the assumption that the British don't 'do' torture. Drawing on previously unseen official documents, and the accounts of witnesses, victims and experts, prize-winning investigative journalist Ian Cobain looks beyond the cover-ups and the attempts to dismiss brutality as the work of a few rogue interrogators, to reveal a secret and shocking record of torture. From WWII to the War on Terror, via Kenya and Northern Ireland, Cruel Britannia shows how the British have repeatedly and systematically resorted to torture, turning a blind eye where necessary, bending the law where they can, and issuing categorical denials all the while. What emerges is a picture of Britain that challenges our complacency on human rights and exposes the lie behind our reputation for fair play.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

IAN COBAIN was born in Liverpool in 1960. He has been a journalist since the early 1980s and is currently an investigative reporter with the Guardian. His inquiries into the UK's involvement in torture since 9/11 have won a number of major awards, including the Martha Gellhorn Prize and the Paul Foot Award for investigative journalism. He has also won several Amnesty International media awards. Cobain lives in London with his wife and two children. This is his first book.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 613 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 320 Seiten
  • Verlag: Portobello Books (19. Oktober 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B008YJAA5O
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #242.864 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  4 Rezensionen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A secret only to the British public 19. November 2012
Von Tommy McKearney - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Cruel Britannia: A Secret History of Torture. Ian Cobain

Britain's public and its government are currently devoting significant attention to the behaviour of the nation's broadcast and print media. Both Parliament and the people are, understandably, concerned to ensure that the powerful Murdoch News Corporation and the equally influential BBC are conducting their affairs properly and with decency. The British people are entitled to know, and indeed demand, that newsgathering is done using correct procedures and that information relating to matters of public concern will be disseminated, whether or not it causes embarrassment to those in positions of power.

It would appear, however, that this commendable degree of scrutiny over Britain's media does not extend to the country's military and intelligence gathering services. Ian Cobain's excellent new book, Cruel Britannia: A Secret History of Torture, reveals with a well researched investigation, that Britain's secret services supported by the military and authorised by successive governments have systematically used torture against enemy personnel and insurgents over many decades.

While Cobain has done an admirable job in providing ample evidence to support his assertion that torture was and continues to be a pillar of British security policy, this is not the most remarkable aspect of his book. It would be strange indeed if, having used torture in every field of conflict the UK has been engaged in since World War II, that there was an absence of such evidence. Cobain does indeed detail at length the sorry history of Britain's use of torture but what his book also reveals is the astonishing lengths that British governments go to in order to deny and cover-up that which is so well known to its many victims (and the UK's allies) across four continents.

Unlike the United States, where former president George Bush has stated publicly that he authorised `water-boarding' suspects (a practice widely recognised as torture), Britain has consistently denied employing what the Americans euphemistically describe as enhanced interrogation techniques.

On some occasions British denials have taken the form of a Jesuitical-like redefining of what constitutes torture. Responding, for example, to allegations of torture in Northern Ireland during the early 1970s, the then British government commissioned Sir Edward Compton to carry out a limited investigation. His conclusion was that physical ill-treatment (hooding, wall-standing, white noise, sleep deprivation, food deprivation) had in fact occurred but that this did not constitute physical brutality and therefore acquitted his employer of torture. Evidence of prisoners being also routinely beaten was apparently overlooked by the inquiry.

More often, though, British governments have simply lied about the brutal methods employed by its security services. By way of illustration, Cobain refers to a statement made by Armed Forces Minister Adam Ingram to the House of Commons in June 2004, `We are not aware' he said, `of any incidents in which United Kingdom interrogators are alleged to have used hooding as an interrogation technique'. A claim he repeated to Parliament's Joint Committee on Human Rights in spite of the fact that he had been aware from the previous September of the use of hoods during interrogation. Evidence of his awareness was to emerge some years later at a subsequent inquiry.

When the issue of torture is occasionally publicly aired in Britain, as in the inquiry referred to above, the discussion tends to be sidetracked into a debate over whether the end justifies the means. Moreover, the conversation to date is usually set in a short-term context and always in the absence of adequate information. Such obfuscation misses the point that torturing an enemy may, at best, deal with the symptoms of a problem but it cannot address the underlying issue. Containing an insurgency is not the same as settling a long running and deeply rooted dispute.

Ian Cobain's book, Cruel Britannia: A Secret History of Torture, provides the evidence and argument that are essential for a properly enlightened debate to take place about Britain's use of torture. Throughout this work, the author leaves us in no doubt that torture occurs and is endorsed at the highest level. What is not so clear is whether Cobain's shocking exposé will generate sufficient outrage that the British government will be obliged to desist from violating its prisoners' human rights. Worthy though the book is in every other respect, it provides little grounds for optimism that Britannia is becoming less cruel.
2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen British torture German soldiers WWII 1. November 2012
Von William Garrison Jr. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
While research World War II topics, Ian Cobain re-discovered a little known book titled ""The London Cage" by Lt. Col. Alexander Scotland (1957 & 1973 reprint). A 26 Oct. 2012 article by Ian Cobain in the U.K. "Daily Mail" newspaper revived interest in this 1957 book. The book was written by a British officer, who acknowledged that he physically persuaded (okay, tortured), about 3,500 captured German officers to make about 1,000 of them confess that they had (allegedly) committed various war crimes against captured British soldiers during World War II. The 1957 book was actually a "watered down" version of his 1954 manuscript that exposed his scandalous torture techniques. The shocking 1955 work was finally released from British archives in late 1979 through a British version of a "Freedom of Information"-like request, but it found little media attention. From additional investigations by the researcher Ian Cobain, he wrote an expose of this shocking, brutal, controversial British military program in his Nov. 2012 book: "Cruel Britannia" (Portobello Books).
5.0 von 5 Sternen A rare view about a subject not mentioned in history classes 11. August 2014
Von Michael Abbott - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Not an easy read but very, very interesting. You may forget what you have learned about German cruelties and change how you see the world.
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen British torture German soldiers WWII 1. November 2012
Von William Garrison Jr. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
While researching World War II topics, Ian Cobain re-discovered a little known book titled ""The London Cage" by Lt. Col. Alexander Scotland (1957 & 1973 reprint). A 26 Oct. 2012 article by Ian Cobain in the U.K. "Daily Mail" newspaper revived interest in this 1957 book. The book was written by a British officer, who acknowledged that he physically persuaded (okay, tortured), about 3,500 captured German officers to make about 1,000 of them confess that they had (allegedly) committed various war crimes against captured British soldiers during World War II. The 1957 book was actually a "watered down" version of his 1954 manuscript that exposed his scandalous torture techniques. The shocking 1955 work was finally released from British archives in late 1979 through a British version of a "Freedom of Information"-like request, but it found little media attention. From additional investigations by the researcher Ian Cobain, he wrote an expose of this shocking, brutal, controversial British military program in his Nov. 2012 book: "Cruel Britannia" (Portobello Books).
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