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Crow with No Mouth [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Ikkyu , Lucien Stryk , Stephen Berg
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 80 Seiten
  • Verlag: Copper Canyon; Auflage: Reprint (März 2001)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1556591527
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556591525
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 20,5 x 14 x 0,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 129.535 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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5.0 von 5 Sternen haiku with an attitude 4. Mai 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
This is classic haiku from the 15th century zen master Ikkyu. Ikkyu was a headmaster at Daitokuji before renouncing the hipocritical attitudes of the monks. Ikkyu was far too hearty and robust to endure that fate. He was not afraid to toss a few obscenities into his writing. This is not your Mothers haiku. Ikkyu cussed and swore and ignored the authorities. This collection gives one a generous sampling of his haiku. This is a neglected genius that often is overlooked in favor of Basho and Ryokan. Those two are also brilliant but Ikkyu is the wild man of the group. He is Rimbaud blaspheming, Whitman yowling a barbaric yawp and Bukowksi drunk on the floor in one package. Its a great introductory collection to haiku and japanese poetry in general.
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Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  16 Rezensionen
19 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Zen poetry as a beatnik would want it translated 24. Oktober 2000
Von M. J. Smith - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Ikkyu wrote his verses in a four line form which has been reworked into couplets by Stephen Berg. It is important to remember that these are version by Stephen Berg not careful translations from the original - as reworkings often are the most accessible translations.
Ikkyu was not a typical Zen master - the monkish disciplines of celebacy and sobriety were not in his repetoire. While this makes him an oddity, it reinforces the ideal that one who is enlightened is one who is free. This freedom (often seen as indifference or non-clinging) is voiced in this poem "Ikkyu this body isn't yours I say to myself / wherever I am I'm there". His freedom from the disciplines is shown in poems that are explicitly sexual not merely erotic. A very tame example: "don't hesitate get laid thaat's wisdom / sitting around chanting what crap".
Ikkyu is definately a poet that students or would-be students of Zen should read ... in fact, we all should read it for the sheer fun and beauty of it.
17 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen haiku with an attitude 4. Mai 2000
Von George Schaefer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This is classic haiku from the 15th century zen master Ikkyu. Ikkyu was a headmaster at Daitokuji before renouncing the hipocritical attitudes of the monks. Ikkyu was far too hearty and robust to endure that fate. He was not afraid to toss a few obscenities into his writing. This is not your Mothers haiku. Ikkyu cussed and swore and ignored the authorities. This collection gives one a generous sampling of his haiku. This is a neglected genius that often is overlooked in favor of Basho and Ryokan. Those two are also brilliant but Ikkyu is the wild man of the group. He is Rimbaud blaspheming, Whitman yowling a barbaric yawp and Bukowksi drunk on the floor in one package. Its a great introductory collection to haiku and japanese poetry in general.
7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Zen poetry like a sword stroke 24. Februar 2006
Von E. E. Hicks - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Ikkyu is perhaps the most like "normal" humans by any accounting of a Zen master I've encountered in print. One can relate to this guy. Some of his poems are like Michael Jordan putting up a final second shot and touching nothing but net. I wasn't sure I would like his poetry since I'm not that big a poetry fan but this is the kind of book to take on a long run down the Grand Canyon or somewhere you might crave inspiration when space is at a premium.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sensual, complicated, beautiful 1. Oktober 2008
Von Rauan Klassnik - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
If you're looking for pretty, nature, Haiku-esque poetry, then this might not be for you. Many of these are graphic sexual depictions. Many have four letter words. Ikkyu, aka Crazy Cloud-- Zen Monk, Enlightened One, Patron of Whorehouses, Virile and Active into Old Age.

But don't think these are just sex poems. These are poems built of a version of primary colors: light, dark, mountains and wind.

There's a Whitmanesque Bullheadedness and Joy of Life to many of these short poems (most 2 lines long, rocking back and forth in their sliding images and rhythms) but you don't get the tongue-in-your-ear feeling that comes with reading Leaves of Grass.

Whether he's telling you about burying his pet sparrow or going down on a woman in the kitchen as she cooks, Ikkyu rewards the reader again and again.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Too far from the original text... 8. April 2014
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I purchased this book because I liked the preface (really that never happens) and I was under the mistaken impression that the author had written it -- it was actually written by Lucien Stryk and not the author, Stephen Berg. Now, that said, let it be noted that the "author" did not translate these, he used translations from others (see the Forward) and from them, he creates the "versions" we see in this book.

Ikkyu's original poems were in four-lines. If you take a look at this book, you'll notice they're no longer in four-lines, they've been condensed to two-lines each. Now, in my mind, Japanese poetry loses enough through translation to English as you lose cultural references, puns, and other subtle references that just don't make it into English, or if they do, they're unnoticed. To then change the emphasis of the poems by putting them in two-lines instead of four...it feels like the poems are being taken further from the originals than necessary. I personally don't understand (or agree with) this change, and the author doesn't explain himself. Rather, he just said (in the Forward), "A true essay about what happened between their texts and mine would have to explain at length a process not usually associated with other such ambitions transfigurations." -- In all honesty, that sounds like some sort of prevarication to me.

In this sort of poetry, the ending of a line gives pause, the ending of a thought, the dragging on of another. It's an act of condensing and stretching out ideas and it makes a very large difference in how something's read and the resulting meaning that's taken away. As this can be hard to imagine, I'm going to give an example.

Here is one of the poems, as written in the book:

"Even before trees rocks I was nothing
when I'm dead nowhere I'll be nothing"
-- "Crow with No Mouth" versions by Stephen Berg, p. 19

Now, both lines are a bit rough to read, they're jerky and don't flow at all. While it may appear enigmatic (something usually attributed to Zen), one might be willing to let go of that rough presentation when realizing that this was not the original layout of the poem as Ikkyu had written it. -- In other words, letting go of that roughness would not take you further from the original poem's meaning. In fact, it may take you closer.

I'm going to personally break the poem up into four-lines instead, see how differently it can be read now:

"Even before trees
rocks I was nothing
when I'm dead nowhere
I'll be nothing"

The line break between "trees" and "rocks" gives a natural pause that is similar to the pause one would insert if reading the words with a comma in between them: "trees, rocks." Note, also, how the word "nothing" is at the end of two lines and the repetition -- not just when read, but visually looking at it -- adds a seriousness to it. This repetition of the word "nothing" can also be seen in the two-line version, but because the lines are longer, and the rhythm isn't as flowing, that isn't necessarily as apparent.

Here's another option:

"Even before trees, rocks
I was nothing
when I'm dead nowhere
I'll be nothing"

This one reads more swiftly, but the lines: "I was nothing" and "I'll be nothing" show a transition through time with a remaining constant: being nothing. This version shows the passage of time more than the previous version, and lends itself more to contemplation of one's place relative to the past and the future -- that is, where one fits in in the grander scheme of things.

Now, those are just two options, but I think it's quite obvious how different two-line and four-line forms are. There's a different flow, a different rhythm, and even the meaning itself can be easier to grasp with the original four-line form.

Honestly, I'm not sure why the author did these versions in two-line form. While they may be closer to Stephen Berg's conception of them, they're farther away from Ikkyu's original form -- and at the end of the day, it was Ikkyu's poems I wanted to read, not Stephen Berg's.

Please look at the preview carefully, make a conclusion for yourself -- it's all about whether you like it or not. Personally, however, I found these to be sub-par and far from Ikkyu's originals -- which is what I had wanted.
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