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Cosmonaut Keep [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Ken Macleod
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Taschenbuch, 1. November 2001 --  

Kurzbeschreibung

1. November 2001
When Alexander Cairns made his fortune, he did some gambling - financing interstallar probes to look for other life forms. Now his son has discovered that one of them has sent back evidence of alien intelligence, and a space ark financed by a rival family is obliviously approaching the area.
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch
  • Verlag: Imprint unknown (1. November 2001)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 4444408294
  • ISBN-13: 978-4444408295
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Like a British--specifically, Scots--counterpart of Bruce Sterling, Ken MacLeod is an SF author who has thought hard about politics and delights in making unlikely alternatives plausible, grippingly readable and often downright funny.

Cosmonaut Keep swaps between two timelines whose characters share the ultimate goal of interstellar travel. In an uncertain future on the far world of Mingulay, human colonists live in the title's ancient, alien-built Keep--coexisting with reptilian "saurs", trading with visiting ships piloted by krakens, and hiding their laborious "Great Work" of developing human-guided navigation between the stars.

Meanwhile alternate chapters present a mid-21st century Earth whose EU is (to America's horror) Russian-dominated with a big red star in the middle of its flag, rumours of alien contact aboun, and computer whizzkid Matt Cairns finds himself carrying a datadisk of unknown origin that offers antigravity and a space drive.

Clearly the later storyline's Gregor Cairns is Matt's descendant. There are ingenious connections and surprises, with witty resonances between their wild careers, their travels and their bumpy love-lives. The foreground action-adventure points to a bigger picture and a master plan known only to the godlike hive-minds who built the "Second Sphere" of interstellar culture and who regard traditional SF dreams of unlimited human expansion through space as precisely equivalent to floods of e-mail spam polluting the tranquil galactic net.

Cosmonaut Keep opens MacLeod's new SF sequence Engines of Light. It is highly entertaining and intelligent, promising more good things to come. --David Langford -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

Like a British--specifically, Scots--counterpart of Bruce Sterling, Ken MacLeod is an SF author who has thought hard about politics and delights in making unlikely alternatives plausible, grippingly readable and often downright funny. Cosmonaut Keep swaps between two timelines whose characters share the ultimate goal of interstellar travel. In an uncertain future on the far world of Mingulay, human colonists live in the title's ancient, alien-built Keep--coexisting with reptilian "saur Meanwhile alternate chapters present a mid-21st century Earth whose EU is (to America's horror) Russian-dominated with a big red star in the middle of its flag, rumours of alien contact aboun, and computer whizzkid Matt Cairns finds himself carrying a dat Clearly the later storyline's Gregor Cairns is Matt's descendant. There are ingenious connections and surprises, with witty resonances between their wild careers, their travels and their bumpy love-lives. The foreground action-adventure points to a bigger Cosmonaut Keep opens MacLeod's new SF sequence Engines of Light. It is highly entertaining and intelligent, promising more good things to come. David Langford, AMAZON.CO.UK REVIEW This man is going to be a major writer IAIN M. BANKS -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
KM ist ein genialer Erzähler und hat mit "Engines of Light" einen klasse SpaceOpera geschrieben. Lesen, nachdenken, lesen, lesen ....
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Boilerplate SciFi 8. Juli 2010
Von Lene
Format:Taschenbuch
Maybe I had set my hopes too high after reading "Newton's Wake" by Ken MacLeod. But even without great expectations this book is a disappointment.

The story alternates between a pre-singularity Earth and a post-singularity galactic empire. While the idea that technological advance accelerates to a pace that makes civilization unrecognizable from our primitive point of view is great stuff for a science fiction novel, MacLeod makes little literary use of it. The post-singularity civilization is hardly different from the one we know. But that is not the weakest part of the novel.

MacLeod appears to be one of those "Hard SF" writers who think that a neat idea for a plot makes an entire book interesting. Well, it doesn't. What makes a book worth reading is its plot, driven by its characters. And the characters in "Cosmonaut Keep" are too two-dimensional, too cliche, too boilerplate for me to even remember their names. MacLeod was not able to interest me in their development, and in fact they hardly develop at all over the course of the book.

The plot, even though it revolves around an interesting idea, is rather weak too. Too often the author pulls another idea, another concept, another deus ex machina out of his trick top hat. I prefer plot that is consistent in itself, that does not need miracles that the author comes up with just as they are needed.

In the author's defense, this book is not meant to stand on its own, it's the first of a (I think) trilogy. Sorry to say though, I am not interested in the least to learn how the story continues.

I am inclined to give Ken MacLeod another chance, though. I will try one of his later books for that.
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Amazon.com: 3.5 von 5 Sternen  34 Rezensionen
29 von 31 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Another strong effort from Macleod 13. Mai 2001
Von J. N. Mohlman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Once again, Ken Macleod has produced an original, intelligent work of science fiction in "Cosmonaut Keep". As usual, he has created a world that is by turns familiar, in other words it has its basis in a plausible future Earth, and completely bizarre. The bizzare aspects, in this isntance, being an earth-like planet that is home to humanoid (and regular) dinosaurs, native humans, and humans from Earth, and starships piloted by giant squid.
Much like his previous books, Macleod has filled this one with quirky, conlicting (and conflicted) politcal theories. It is in this regard that he shines as one of the smartest authors around today. He writes with the authority of a polical scientist, but never comes across as dogmatic. I suspect that in real life he is left of center, but the politcal philosophies his characters espouse are really just vehicles to drive the plot.
Finally, one positive, one negative. On the positive side, the characters in "Cosmonaut Keep" are Macleod's best yet. They show a level of depth that is just amazing; a level I didn't find in his previous works. On the negative side, "Cosmonaut Keep", like Macleod's other novels is told in alternating time periods. This proves to be a very creative way to intertwine seemingly disparite storylines, but it is handled poorly in the first half of this novel. Macleod should have been more careful in the details he reveals, as I found myself hopelessly confused 50 pages in. In the end all becomes clear, but this is a tough novel to get into as a result.
Ultimately, though, "Cosmonaut Keep" is a smart, entertaining beginning to what promises to be a great series. Enjoy!
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Macleod's authorial mid-life crisis? 3. Mai 2001
Von flying-monkey - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
What's happening to Ken MacLeod?
It seems to be a kind of authorial mid-lfe crisis for SF authors that they have to write a three-volume space opera or they won't feel complete. Some of these are superb though: for example, Peter Hamiliton's 'Night's Dawn' sequence and Paul J. MacAuley's recent trilogy. Macleod's (at least judging by this first volume), doesn't measure up.
Despite having reservations about his ability to really sustain a story, and his often wooden or stereotyped characters, I've always enjoyed his books, not least because of their determinedly idiosyncratic left-wing politics and situations. This one is also enjoyable enough, and has some great individual scenes (in particular the dinosaur-herding-by-flying-saucer bit), but it is too much of the same: parrallel stories (again), beautiful dark-haired heroines (again) etc. And, some of the devices needed to keep the plot going just make you go "D'oh!". I also found the nearer future story-line featuring a group of very dull computer hackers and their friends, uninvolving.
I was left feeling unsure whether the whole thing wasn't meant as parody, and perhaps that the author wasn't sure either. Oh well...
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Thoughtful plot, but hard to follow. 28. Februar 2003
Von Neal C. Reynolds - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I had to sort of work my way through this novel. I was interested in the characters and in the depiction of relationships between the 'saurs and the humans. However, the jumping back and forth between the two time periods, novel & interesting at first, became rather annoying to me.
However, this is rather good space opera, and should satisfy those who enjoy "hard" science-fiction. It's good enough that I'll be reading the second part of the trilogy.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The beginning of something big 11. Januar 2002
Von Thomas Christensen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The first book in MacLeods Engines of Light series and the first thing that he has written since the Fall Revolution series.
It's clear to see that MacLeod has had better time for planning before he started this series - the universe seems better structured and the foundation a lot more stable than it did in The Fall Revolution. MacLeod seems a lot more secures as he shows us glimpses of his universe.
This book has two story lines. One telling the tale of how man found faster-than-light travel and one about a marine biologist (and his friends) on the planet of Mingled. And then there's the gods to connect them.
MacLeod is better than ever in this book.
Unfortunately he looses it a bit the sequel (Dark Light), but that's another story.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Frustrating initially, but ultimately satisfying 11. März 2003
Von Avid Political Junkie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
For some reason Ken MacLeod insists upon withholding key information about (A) the time relationships between the two story lines of this novel, and (B) the background history of his fictional universe. Worse yet, I can't see that this obfuscation helps to move the plot along in any way. It just made this reader confused, hoping that the author would at some point deign to explain what's going on. He eventually does, and the book concludes in a satisfactory manner. But a couple of times I almost gave up and chucked it in my library's donation bin out of frustration.
If you want a few hints that are not really plot spoilers:
1. Matt Cairns is the ancestor of Gregor Cairns.
2. The Matt Cairns storyline takes place in near future, and Gregor Cairns storyline takes place in a more distant future.
3. There's a hierarchy of intelligences in this fictional universe: our hominid cousins (the pithkies), humans, the saurs (intelligent dinosaurs), the krakens, the Grays, the gods (some sort of sentient colonial micro-organism). Pithkies, humans, saurs, and krakens all originated on Earth and were exported (over the eons) to the surrounding planetary systems by the gods, greys, and/or some other intelligent life form.
4. The immortality of the original cosmonaut crew is not explained until the end of the novel, and then only in passing. The implications are that everyone back on Earth are now immortal, too. (Will this be a key fact to know in the next novels in this series?)
Never fear. Half way through this novel, most of your questions will be answered, and your enjoyment will begin to outweigh your frustration.
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