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Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science
 
 

Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science [Kindle Edition]

Atul Gawande
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 6,76 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Taschenbuch EUR 10,75  
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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Gently dismantling the myth of medical infallibility, Dr. Atul Gawande's Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is essential reading for anyone involved in medicine--on either end of the stethoscope. Medical professionals make mistakes, learn on the job, and improvise much of their technique and self-confidence. Gawande's tales are humane and passionate reminders that doctors are people, too. His prose is thoughtful and deeply engaging, shifting from sometimes painful stories of suffering patients (including his own child) to intriguing suggestions for improving medicine with the same care he expresses in the surgical theater. Some of his ideas will make health care providers nervous or even angry, but his disarming style, confessional tone, and thoughtful arguments should win over most readers. Complications is a book with heart and an excellent bedside manner, celebrating rather than berating doctors for being merely human. --Rob Lightner

Amazon.co.uk

Gently dismantling the myth of medical infallibility, Dr Atul Gawande's Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is essential reading for anyone involved in medicine--on either end of the stethoscope. Medical professionals make mistakes, learn on the job and improvise much of their technique and self-confidence. Gawande's tales are humane and passionate reminders that doctors are people, too. His prose is thoughtful and deeply engaging, shifting from sometimes-painful stories of suffering patients (including his own child) to intriguing suggestions for improving medicine with the same care he expresses in the surgical theatre. Some of his ideas will make health-care providers nervous or even angry, but his disarming style, confessional tone and thoughtful arguments should win over most readers. Complications is a book with heart and an excellent bedside manner, celebrating rather than berating doctors for being merely human. --Rob Lightner

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 607 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 292 Seiten
  • Verlag: Profile Books; Auflage: 2 (9. Juli 2010)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0037Z8SM2
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #30.991 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Mehr über den Autor

Atul Gawande ist Facharzt für Chirurgie an einer Klinik in Boston. Als Wissenschaftsredakteur veröffentlicht er regelmäßig Beiträge in "The New Yorker". Vor seiner medizinischen Ausbildung an der Harvard Medical School studierte der Sohn zweier Ärzte Philosophie und Ethik. Gawande lebt mit seiner Familie in Newton, Massachusetts.

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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Faszination Medizin 15. Februar 2005
Von Daniel Fischer VINE-PRODUKTTESTER
Format:Taschenbuch
Ein Buch von einem Chirurgen... Hmm, selber Anästhesist - und somit ein "natürlicher" Feind jenseits der Blut-Hirnschranke - geht man natürlich mit einiger Skepsis an die Lektüre. Jedoch kann ich nur jedem, egal ob Non-Mediziner oder Halbgott in Weiß, raten, dieses Buch zu lesen. Anhand von konkreten Fallberichten wird ein Aspekt der Medizin, der ansonsten meist zu kurz kommt, sowohl aus der individuellen als auch aus der wissenschaftlichen Sicht beleuchtet. Nach der Lektüre des Buches wird man sich wieder bewußt, daß Medizin trotz Technik und Standards doch noch eine gewisse Kunst ist... Oder besser: Ein ungewöhnliches Handwerk...
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6 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Menschliche Chirurgie 11. August 2002
Von "aliki70"
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Ein engagierter junger Chirurg versucht in diesem Buch, seinen Lesern Einblicke in die Schattenseiten seines Berufes zu geben. Obwohl umgeben vom Mythos der ärztlich- wissenschaftlichen Unfehlbarkeit, sind Chirurgen doch ganz normale Menschen, die sich häufig trotz aller Technik von ihrem Gefühl leiten lassen ( müssen). Besonders gefallen hat mir Gawandes Diskussion des Dilemmas "Selbstbestimmung vs. Fremdbestimmung" der Patienten im Krankenhaus; es zeigt deutlich, daß er nicht einer jener Ärzte ist, denen das Wohlergehen seiner Patienten egal ist.
Dieses Buch gibt Hoffnung, daß die neue Generation junger Chirurgen sich deutlich von jener der arroganten "allwissenden" Weißkittel aus früheren Tagen unterscheidet.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Empfehlenswert 17. Juni 2013
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Spannend und stilistisch gut geschrieben, inhaltlich sehr interessant. Allerdings nicht unbedingt empfehlenswert, wenn man vor einem chirurgischen Eingriff steht! :-)
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Brilliant, an absolute must-read! 15. November 2004
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
One of the most fascinating books on the medical process I've ever read, Dr. Gawande manages to make the many illnesses and techniques discussed accessible to the lay reader without being condescending. His tone is gently competent and thoughtful. He discusses some successes in practice, as well as hair-raising blunders and mishaps, but manages to leave the reader feeling that medicine may not be so hopeless after all. The acceptance of the human side of health care professionals is highly productive, since this does not imply that the health-care procedures cannot be improved. Dr. Gawande puts his faith in modern technological improvments as well as in human intuition and simple caring. I'm waiting for his next book, as well as watching the New Yorker for new articles. Read this book if you are even vaguely interested in modern medical science!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  326 Rezensionen
73 von 76 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Confident With Him As My Surgeon 8. Mai 2002
Von taking a rest - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
"Complications", by Dr. Atul Gawande is a very gutsy and honest discussion about medicine in general, and surgeons in particular. The book is also unique, for unlike others of its type it is written by a surgeon that is starting his career, and not looking back upon it. I would imagine that the book caused some consternation amongst his peers. The book does nothing to minimize the skills and accomplishments of the men and women who can reach in to the body and do some pretty spectacular work. The book does portray them as human beings that come with all the normal traits that any of us do. The pressure they must deal with is that when they make a mistake, it can irreparably harm or cause the death of the patient they are trying to help.
The vast majority of careers that people practice does not involve decisions that can cause the outcomes I mention above. And few occupations require of their practitioners near perfection, that if not delivered has a major legal industry prepared to hammer them with lawsuits. Incompetent or negligent doctors should be punished and removed from practice, but what about a human error, or a doctor that makes every single decision that is correct and appropriate for the patient he or she sees, and misses the 1 in 250,000 cases where doing everything correctly can cause a patient to die. The final chapter of this book deals with exactly those type of odds. Whether those odds are beaten often depends on the instincts of the physician. And these intuitive feelings they may or may not act upon are certainly helped by experience, but younger doctors without the years that familiarity brings can often make a decision largely because they are so new. Dr. Gawande makes clear that all the sophisticated technology available does not replace the one on one interaction with the patient.
If we ever need a surgeon we want a person we perceive as experienced, a person we are literally willing to risk our health and our lives with. The problem is that virtually no one wants to be part of a new surgeon learning his craft even with very experienced surgeons standing right at the table, watching and even directing the path the surgery takes. Dr. Gawande also shares his feelings when his children are ill and the contradictions he deals with as a parent, even as he is often on the other side with people judging him and his youth.
The statistics say that a surgeon will make a given mistake once every 200 times he or she performs a surgery that is described in the book, and that is also fairly common. If the mistake is made the results range from terrible to potentially terminal. The author does a great job of sharing what it feels like to be told that you will make the mistake, that doing the task 99.5% of the time without error can still cost a life.
A person who decides to become a general surgeon will study and practice until their mid 30's before they are able to operate on their own. That type of commitment is rare, and recent articles have said that less men and women are willing to devote that much of their lives before beginning their chosen career.
We want these people to be perfect when it is either we, or someone we care about that is to be operated on. They are not perfect, although those that are excellent can statistically come very near perfection. I would trust Dr. Gawande for he is a man that is clearly skilled, but is also acutely aware of how fine a line he walks every moment of his day.
109 von 124 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Essay Collection from Surgeon, New Yorker author 3. April 2002
Von Kathleen Brennan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is basically a collection of essays Gawande has published in the <i>New Yorker</i>, where he is a staff writer, along with a few from <i>Slate</i>. His writing style is similar to that of Malcolm Gladwell, Jerome Groopman, and other <i>New Yorker</i> authors of the David Remnick era - intelligent and clear.
Gawande is a surgical resident, so he is experienced enough to have insight into the medical profession and practices of surgeons, but still new enough in the field to bring a keen critical mind and the clarity of a relative outsider's perspective. Also, his compassion is one of his distinct qualities and shines through in the writing.
If you are a regular New Yorker reader, you probably have already read all of these essays. The brilliant essay about why doctors make mistakes is included, as well as memorable essays about when good doctors go bad, and how the practice of autopsy goes in and out of fashion. The only one that was new to me was the one about a surgeons' convention, which was entertaining but not crucial reading. It is nice to have them all in once place, but unless you are a completist or a rabid Gawande fan, I'd recommend getting it from the library or waiting for the paperback.
19 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An utterly fascinating view 11. April 2002
Von David Sullivan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
There are other writing doctors around, but there's nobody like Atul Gawande. I'd first got to know his voice, his distinctive approach -- immense vivid medical detail combined with an almost philosophical interest in the systemic or ethical dimensions of the problems he explores--in the pages of The New Yorker. But there's a lot here that never appeared in that magazine, and, besides, the whole really is greater than the sum of its part. His arguments -- about the fallibility of medicine, about judgment under conditions of uncertainty, etc. -- run through the chapters like sinews. "Complications" is a genuine page turner, but you come away not only entertained, but enlightened, too. I've recommended it to a lot of my friends, and nobody's been disappointed yet.
15 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Read This Book! 25. Juni 2002
Von Timothy Haugh - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Rarely do I think a book is so important and so good that it should be read by everyone. Atul Gawande has written such a book.
America has the best health care in the world and yet our health care system is a mess. High insurance rates and malpractice suits make for a situation where patients often cannot get the help they need and many doctors are afraid of taking risks because of the chance of being sued. With a willingness to realize certain things and make some changes, America could turn it's medical services into a true blessing for all of its citizens.
What is the most important realization? That doctors are human beings and even the best of them are going to make mistakes from time to time. This is probably the most important point Gawande makes in his book. It is a sad state of affairs when every single doctor in this nation expects to be the defendant in a major lawsuit at least once in their careers. How many possible brilliant doctors has this single fact driven from the profession? It is one thing when a doctor makes an error through maliciousness but a doctor who makes an honest mistake should not have to fear career destruction. If something could be done about all this litigation, it would likely be easier to drive truly bad doctors from the profession because doctors and hospitals would be more like to start admitting when things go haywire and actually make a concerted effort to try to make things better.
Though his insights into what it's like to be a doctor are incredibly valuable, I find his views on the psychology of being a patient interesting as well. His articles on the mystery of pain, the horrors of nausea & blushing (yes, blushing) and the results of a patient who has undergone gastric bypass surgery for obesity are eye-openers. He also has a very good chapter on the ethics of medical decision-making between a patient and doctor. Those people in the camp that all medical decision should be left up to the patient need to understand that, in many cases, the patient simply doesn't want to make that decision.
I had read much of the material that is in this book before as Gawande has published in various magazines. But I kept an eye out for this and I am glad to see it all gathered together in a single volume. It has been awhile since I've been so impressed by a book.
19 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Complications= Great book for a small-group discussion 12. Dezember 2002
Von Jordan Wilson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I found Complications by Atul Gawande to be an exciting read from cover to cover. It is filled with a variety of topics centering around medicine's fallibility, mystery, and uncertainty, as perceived by Gawande who is himself a surgeon. Gawande's mastery of language makes each chapter come to life by developing the situation and revealing topics often ignored by the medical community. He also does a great job of leaving his own bias or opinions out of the chapters. This undirected, yet thought-provoking prose was ideal for our small-group discussion class which read his book. We found many topics to discuss and ethical issues to ponder. Although our time was limited as a class, I believe we could have spent much more time digging deeper into the issues Gawande addressed. Issues that we especially enjoyed pondering included the idea of "practicing" medicine on patients as part of the educational process, the robot feel of sub-specialty medicine vs. primary care medicine, and the stories of patients living with medical problems such as the "man who couldn't stop eating." Overall, I highly recommend this collection of short stories both because it is a delight to read, and because it raises some very interesting ideas that I hope to further investigate.
Jordan Wilson
Medical Student
UMD School of Medicine
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Conscious learning becomes unconscious knowledge, and you cannot say precisely how. &quote;
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No matter what measures are taken, doctors will sometimes falter, and it isnt reasonable to ask that we achieve perfection. What is reasonable is to ask that we never cease to aim for it. &quote;
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There have now been many studies of elite performersinternational violinists, chess grand masters, professional ice-skaters, mathematicians, and so forthand the biggest difference researchers find between them and lesser performers is the cumulative amount of deliberate practice theyve had. &quote;
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