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The Church of Dead Girls (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 29. Oktober 1998

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 448 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin UK; Auflage: New edition (29. Oktober 1998)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0140273913
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140273915
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 11 x 2,8 x 18 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.9 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (113 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 727.929 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

A literary chameleon, Stephen Dobyns is as well known for his poetry as he his for his taut and chilling mysteries. The two disciplines collide in The Church of Dead Girls, a lyrical novel that inspired Stephen King to comment, "If ever there was a tale for a moonless night, a high wind and a creaking floor, this is it ... I don't expect to read a more frightening novel this year."

Aurelius is a drowsy bedroom community in upstate New York that is rocked by a vicious, seemingly random killing. A woman is found murdered in her bed, her left hand missing. Just when the grisly details begin to fade, a young girl vanishes. The only clue: a bag with the girl's washed and folded clothes and a mannequin's left hand. Soon two more girls disappear, and when clues remain elusive, conjecture and rumour take over. The town awakens to a nightmare of suspicion and vigilantism. As the killer spirals in to kill again, the town spins out of control, and The Church of Dead Girls heads to a jolting conclusion. It'll give you goosebumps even if you read it at the beach.

Pressestimmen

"Very rich, very scary, very satisfying."--Stephen King

"A macabre version of Our Town...Superb."--The Washington Post Book World

"The creepiness mounts with Hitchcockian intensity; the bloody conclusion is worth the wait."--The Chicago Tribune

:Tantalizingly sinister...Dobyns hooks us from the very first sentence." --People

"It's unlikely there will be a better novel this season than The Church of Dead Girls." --New York Daily News
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Lawyeraau am 16. Januar 2003
Format: Taschenbuch
This is an exquisitely written book. So beautifully is it written that, at times, its lyricism is almost poetic. The richness of the writing is immediately apparent in the prologue. It is the prologue that draws the reader in, so rich is it in its descriptiveness. It is there that the reader first comes upon "The Church of Dead Girls."
The book itself is not so much about the murder of young girls, as it is about the reactions of the people in the small town in which the murders occur. It is their reactions to the murders that are central to this book and conveyed to the reader through a brilliantly nuanced, first person narrative by the town's high school biology teacher.
The people in the town of Aurelius in upstate New York are like those found in many small towns, insular and inherently suspicious of anything different from that which they are used to. Aurelius is representative of a lot of small towns across America. There is really nothing special about this moribund, complacent little town, until young, teenage girls begin disappearing, one by one.
Through the contrivance of first person narration, the author explores the deepest recesses of human nature, as suspicions and accusations unfold and finger pointing begins. No one in town is exempt from the poison of suspicion. The finger is first pointed to the most likely target, a foreign-born college professor whose ideas run counter to that of mainstream Middle America. He is a newcomer to the town and is as different from the majority of the townspeople as can be. This hapless individual becomes demonized in the frenzy of suspicion, petty hatreds, and fear with draconian results. Unfortunately, he is only the first.
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Von Lawyeraau am 1. Januar 2005
Format: Taschenbuch
This is an exquisitely written book. So beautifully is it written that, at times, its lyricism is almost poetic. The richness of the writing is immediately apparent in the prologue. It is the prologue that draws the reader in, so rich is it in its descriptiveness. It is there that the reader first comes upon "The Church of Dead Girls."
The book itself is not so much about the murder of young girls, as it is about the reactions of the people in the small town in which the murders occur. It is their reactions to the murders that are central to this book and conveyed to the reader through a brilliantly nuanced, first person narrative by the town's high school biology teacher.
The people in the town of Aurelius in upstate New York are like those found in many small towns, insular and inherently suspicious of anything different from that which they are used to. Aurelius is representative of a lot of small towns across America. There is really nothing special about this moribund, complacent little town, until young, teenage girls begin disappearing, one by one.
Through the contrivance of first person narration, the author explores the deepest recesses of human nature, as suspicions and accusations unfold and finger pointing begins. No one in town is exempt from the poison of suspicion. The finger is first pointed to the most likely target, a foreign-born college professor whose ideas run counter to that of mainstream Middle America. He is a newcomer to the town and is as different from the majority of the townspeople as can be. This hapless individual becomes demonized in the frenzy of suspicion, petty hatreds, and fear with draconian results. Unfortunately, he is only the first.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von Ein Kunde am 29. Oktober 1997
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I didn't find this novel to be nearly as good--nor nearly as bad--as most of the previous takes. I do agree with some of the criticism. There was not a clear, strong, convincing motivation for the antagonist to commit his heinous deeds, so that makes his/her actions somewhat less credible. It didn't seem likely that this person could conceal his/her sickness so effectively from the community at large, and particularly his/her own family, given the plight they found themselves in. This is especially true since, as another critic eluded to, the transformation from upstanding citizen to raving psychopath occurred in about two paragraphs. But, and it's a big "but," I _loved_ reading this story. The portrait of the interactions of a small community, and how those interactions were transformed after the abductions began, were for me quite riveting. I disagree with the assertion that the POV of the narrator kept the reader at a distance. I thought the POV was very well chosen, especially as it came to light that community members thought there was reason to suspect our narrator as the villain. This enabled us to experience the paranoia first hand, and to me that seemed to be the main point of the book. It also made for a very satisfying (and quite genius, IMO) epilogue! My other criticisms are: (1) the narrator just knew too damn much about the excruciatingly minor details (i.e. the types of clothes people were wearing, the expressions on their faces, etc.) of dozens of scenes where he wasn't present for the reader to really believe this was his POV. It wasn't--the author was obviously omniscient. And (2) where it is reported that the narrator routinely observes the blind nieghbor girl masturbating in her room after supper and after her evening shower (BTW, this gives away nothing of the story). Why would she have the light on?
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