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Catching the Wolf of Wall Street: More Incredible True Stories of Fortunes, Schemes, Parties, and Prison
 
 

Catching the Wolf of Wall Street: More Incredible True Stories of Fortunes, Schemes, Parties, and Prison [Kindle Edition]

Jordan Belfort
3.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 6,49 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Praise for Catching the Wolf of Wall Street

“Still a hustler, still a salesman—and also a hell of a writer.” —Kirkus Reviews
“Salacious reading.”—The Star-Ledger

Praise for Jordan Belfort’s The Wolf of Wall Street

 
“More pertinent today than ever.”—USA Today
“A rollicking tale.”—Forbes.com
“Unvarnished and often hilarious.”—The New York Times
“Compelling . . . a page-turner.”—The Roanoke Times

Kurzbeschreibung

In the 1990s Jordan Belfort became one of the most infamous names in American finance: a brilliant, conniving stock-chopper. He was THE WOLF OF WALL STREET, whose life of greed, power and excess was so outrageous it could only be true; no one could make this up! But the day Jordan was arrested and taken away in handcuffs was not the end of the madness.
Catching the Wolf of Wall Street tells of what happened next. After getting out of jail on $10 million bail he had to choose whether to plead guilty and act as a government witness or fight the charges and see his wife be charged as well. he cooperated.
With his trademark brash, brazen and thoroughly unputdownable storytelling, Jordan details more incredible true tales of fortunes made and lost, money-making schemes, parties, sex, drugs, marriage, divorce and prison.

PRAISE FOR THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

'What separates Jordan's story from others like it, is the brutal honesty.' - Leonardo DiCaprio
'Raw and frequently hilarious.' - The New York Times
'Reads like a cross between Tom Wolfe's Bonfire of the Vanities and Scorsese's Goodfellas ... Laugh-out funny.' - The Sunday Times

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5.0 von 5 Sternen As good as it can get 28. Januar 2014
Format:Taschenbuch
An excellent continuation of Jordan's first autobiographic book, especially interesting from a psychosocial and social forensic angles. Never boring, Jordan is a master of story telling and wording, be it verbally or written.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Poor continuation for great first part 10. November 2012
Von dae_raphi
Format:Kindle Edition|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
I was a big fan of the first book and read it in one night. However, this second book is not half as catching as the first one. Jordan talks +-80% of the time about his two "super" kinds. Not exactly what I would have expected, it is just boring.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 von 5 Sternen  108 Rezensionen
77 von 88 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen better then the first one but still not very good 28. Mai 2009
Von je - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
After Belfort's first disaster, he comes back with a continuation of his life after Stratton. I find the author to be very self indulgent, whether it's cheating in business or on his wives, abusing drugs and alcohol, or boasting about how much everything in his house costs. As the Feds close in, Belfort is offered a deal: rat on your friends for a reduced sentence. Jordan takes about ten minutes before quickly agreeing. Even though he is now faced with repaying the staggering sum of over $100 million in restitution, Jordan shows very little remorse for all the people he ripped off. Instead, he seems to whine over being supposedly singled out for something "everyone on Wall Street does". After being barred from the securities industry, Jordan enters an appropriate field: taking advantage of lower income people in the refinancing business.

For those who don't quite grasp what Jordan did, here is a little primer:

Stratton would seek to a company public; lets call it ABC. Stratton would look to raise 6 million dollars by selling 1 million shares at 6. (a lot of these deals were units with warrants attatched, but for the sake of simplicity I'm going to just call them shares. The concept is the same). Three to six months before going public, Stratton would structure a bridge loan to ABC for say $500,000. ABC might need this money to pay legal and accounting expenses. An investor (generally a friend of Jordan's) would put up the money in return for one million shares at $.50.
Six months later, ABC goes public. Stratton's brokers are selling it like crazy, promising investors that the stock is the next Microsoft and ready to go "TO DA MOON!" Lets say instead of selling clients one million shares, they sell them 2 million. Where did the extra million shares come from? Simple. Remember the bridge loan at fifty cents? Well Jordan would pay him two dollars for his stock. The investor makes a quick $1.50/share, or $1.5 million on a $500,000 investment. Not bad. Frequently, the investor would kick back some of these proceeds to Jordan.
Okay, lets go back to the first day of trading. Stratton has virtual total control over the float of the stock by not allowing a broker to sell unless he had a corresponding buy order. Thus, no stock would ever hit the rest of Wall Street. Because Stratton controls the market, they might open the stock up at say, 15. Jordan then goes out to his sales force with a great deal: He will let them but one million shares at 11, and sell them to their clients at 15. The brokers will make $4/share, or over 25%! Why would Jordan offer them stock at 11? Because he took it from the bridge loan investor at 2. So Stratton makes $9/share on one million shares in it's trading acct, plus all the investment banking fees and any kickbacks as well. Remember, they only raised six million (minus fees) for the company. So, Jordan makes over 150% on the money he raised! Sooner or later, the stock collapses, and the investors are left holding stock worth pennies. Needless to say, this is all totally illegal.
42 von 47 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen One Book Too Many 24. März 2009
Von D. Wagner - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Who would write a book boasting about snitching on all their friends? And it's unclear to me why he needs to describe every detail of his sex life with his wife. Classy. What he needs to do is learn to write a sentence that doesn't have a cliche in it; and if I ever see the word "alas" again I'm going to shoot myself in the head. His first book was amusing, due to the drug and spending sprees, unfortunately this book takes place after those ended.
40 von 47 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Unrepentant 6. Juli 2009
Von Marcos - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
It is hard to review this book because we get so upset about the main character that our feelings spread to the book itself. The book is fun and interesting, not because it is well written (it is not) but because the situation itself is original and adventurous. Therefore, the only merit Belfort has as an author is that "he has been there".

In this book, Belfort tells us about the events after getting caught by the FBI, how he ratted his friends, and his relationship with women. He sounds like he was very sorry about being caught, but not at all about the people he screwed. In fact, the first thing he does after his money runs dry is to start selling mortgage based loans to poor people (knowing well that they will lose their houses).

Belfort suffers from a pathological inability to put himself in other people's shoes, he is unable to relate to feelings and to have anything more than a childish relationship with anyone. This goes for his victims and his women. My bet is that he is a psychopath in some degree. He refers to his second wife as a Duchess, and basically has a marriage based on sex. Everybody tells him she is a gold-digging whore, but he is the only one who can't see it (she is). Then he goes on to live with a dysfunctional super-model who can't even have a conversation with him. Women are trophies for his vanity.

The only truth we read in the whole book is when the judge says that he is not super-talented as he thinks, that many people as talented as him didn't get as much money just because they refrained from crossing the criminal line. That's the bottom line: Belfort is not super smart, he is a super liar, one who lies even to himself.
19 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen You're not Bernie 2. März 2009
Von Larry Brown - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
I'm confused by Jordan's delusion of grandeur whereby he assumes `everyone' knew who he was and what he was doing both during his `hey day' and afterwards. If, during the time of his Stratton days, you'd asked 1000 Wall street people if they'd ever heard of Belfort or Stratton Oakmont, I guarantee you 997 of them would say no. If you'd asked 1000 non-Wall street people, 1000 would never had heard of him or Stratton...assuming they weren't clients. The only reason I ever heard of Stratton was that my firm cleared his trades.
By the way, Jordan (early in the book) states that his clients "...could have sold their shares anytime they wanted to..." Not quite. If I had a dime for every Stratton customer who called my firm complaining about their inability to sell, I'd be living in Old Brookville.
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen A Very Arrogant Man 26. September 2010
Von Karen Force - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
The author did a good job of capturing himself as he was: an arrogant, short sighted, drug induced, alcoholic financier of Wall St. True, he was a genius when it came to making money by ripping people off with schemes. As with everyone who spends a lot of hours working his trade, he became over confident and greedy then it all collapsed around him. He is the epitome of what is wrong with Wall St. and our country in general at this time in our history. It saddens me to know there are so many of them that exist and don't get caught. And when they do get caught, they usually get a slap on the wrist for cooperating by turning their fellow cohorts into the feds then get let back out onto the streets to screw the little guy again. Yes, he did prison time but not near enough time. Up until the day he went to prison he really felt he wouldn't go there. He felt the feds would look the other way while he was screwing his mistresses in his gold plated home. Has he really changed as he says since getting out and losing everything that was near and dear to him? Doubtful. I gave this book to an acquaintenace to read because he too considers himself to be a genius. He too is arrogant about who he is. He felt the author was over the top with his actions and language and the author actually embarrassed him! What's interesting is their excesses and language are exact mirrors of one another. What does this have to say about people who consider themselves geniuses? I guess I would recommend this book to anyone who thinks they are better than anyone else, uses drugs and alcohol to escape and even though they have a high IQ, speaks as though they live in the ghetto. Or I would recommend you buy this book to give as a gift for that certain someone who thinks they're a genius and see if they can see themselves in the mirror.
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