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Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

John Brooks

Kindle-Preis: EUR 8,99 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"More than two decades after Warren [Buffett] lent it to me--and more than four decades after it was first published--"Business Adventures" remains the best business book I've ever read . . . Brooks's deeper insights about business are just as relevant today as they were back then." --Bill Gates, "The Wall Street Journal""The prose is superb. Reading Brooks is a supreme pleasure. His writing turns potentially eye-glazing topics (e.g., price-fixing scandals in the industrial electronics market) into rollicking narratives. He's also funny. . . . He tells entertaining stories replete with richly drawn characters, setting them during heightened moments within the world of commerce." --"Slate"

Kurzbeschreibung

'The best business book I've ever read.' Bill Gates, Wall Street Journal



'The Michael Lewis of his day.' New York Times



What do the $350 million Ford Motor Company disaster known as the Edsel, the fast and incredible rise of Xerox, and the unbelievable scandals at General Electric and Texas Gulf Sulphur have in common? Each is an example of how an iconic company was defined by a particular moment of fame or notoriety.



These notable and fascinating accounts are as relevant today to understanding the intricacies of corporate life as they were when the events happened.



Stories about Wall Street are infused with drama and adventure and reveal the machinations and volatile nature of the world of finance. John Brooks's insightful reportage is so full of personality and critical detail that whether he is looking at the astounding market crash of 1962, the collapse of a well-known brokerage firm, or the bold attempt by American bankers to save the British pound, one gets the sense that history really does repeat itself.



This business classic written by longtime New Yorker contributor John Brooks is an insightful and engaging look into corporate and financial life in America.


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Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  160 Rezensionen
66 von 70 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen It's Great to Have This Title Back 13. Juli 2014
Von Stephen M. St Onge - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Back in the Late Bronze Age, aka the 1970s, I discovered John Brooks and his marvelous accounts of Wall Street and USAmerican business. Brooks died in 1993, and his books have been half-forgotten. I'm very pleased to see this title rereleased in digital format, and I hope all his works are appear soon as eBooks.

This book casts a wide net over the USAmerican business and investing scene, always with with and insight. There's a lot to be learned here, as Brooks examines the three-day stock market mini-crash of 1962, how Ford lost a bundle on the Edsel, how GE broke the anti-trust laws, how Xerox became very wealthy (later, Xerox became very broke, but that was after this article) . . . all great stuff.

Rereading these after forty years, I'm impressed with Brooks ability to get to the bottom of things, especially when there is no "bottom". Why did the New York Stock exchange lose over 5% one day in 1962, then rally suddenly? No one really knows, but Brooks examines the chaos of that day, and dissects the explanations offered after the fact — while noting that BEFORE the fact, none of the explainers had a clue what was about to happen. Interspersed are comments from THE first book ever written on stock markets, "Confusion of Confusions", by Josseph Penso de la Vega (no product link; apparently Amazon doesn't want to use its reviews to sell books other than the one being reviewed anymore). Brooks demonstrates how little has changed over the centuries.

And so it goes through the rest of the essays. Facts and insight, presented with wit, charm, and grace. Highly recommended.
38 von 39 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Anecdotes on Business 19. Juli 2014
Von H. Roulo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I had heard, as I think everyone else has, that Business Adventures was a favorite book of Bill Gates and Warren Buffet. I read the ebook, and I understand a print version will be forthcoming in September.

This book makes me feel as though I'm sitting at the knee of my grandfather, listening to wise recollections.
A writer of articles in the 1950's and 1960, many for the New Yorker, the author intelligently and thoughtfully steps through 12 events, one per chapter.

At first I thought perhaps I was particularly dense and wasn't getting the message. What held these stories together? Eventually, I realized that the author is not driving home a point, selling anything, or giving advice. His observations leave room for the reader to consider events, their connections, their parallels to today, the importance of character, and the question of morality in business. It was refreshing not to be told what to think.

I enjoyed the stories of Ford's Edsel, Piggly Wiggly, Xerox, Goodrich vs Latex.

The chapter on the federal income tax is particularly relevant, given the wide-spread debate about taxes and modern conversations about the 1%.

John Brooks' perspective is firmly rooted in the past, when the book was written, and provides readers opportunity for a sense of omniscience since we can consider ramifications the author himself could not be aware of, at that time.

Times may change. People do not.
34 von 39 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Before "Greed was Good" 14. Juli 2014
Von BookVodney - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This is a glimpse into the Golden 60's when American Industry provided a good prospect and promise for the middle class. The 1960's saw US leadership in technology, winning with the Race to the Moon, and a revolution in Women & Civil rights. Mr. Brooks spot lighted a series of case studies featuring US companies and stock market events from that Era. It's interesting that a copy machine made by Xerox cost the price of a stately home, and required a skilled technician to operate it. Also a fire extinguisher was provided as a standby if it caught on fire. Yet Xerox was a top line growth company that made its investors big returns.

I like this book for the following reasons: it's speaks to America Innovation and investors who had the courage to hang in there and bear the up and downs. 2) It demonstrates the fact that leadership requires set- backs & those companies that accepted the risk will learn and succeed. 3) it gives me hope that stock market investors will learn from the in depth analysis Mr. Brooks brought forward that investing in truly motivated companies with the guts to innovate are worth putting forth your money & time to invest in. Finally it's a lesson into studying & seeking companies focused on producing leading edge products regardless of the quarterly bottom line, and weekly up & downs of global events.

The early printings of this book are impossible to find. Therefore, Mr. Buffet & Gates have come forth to reveal this lost treasure providing lessons from our past, and hopefully will instill a new (but old) way of thinking on how to seek and invest in top businesses. Reading this book has change my perspective on investing (maybe long term investing in the right companies is the way to go), and I truly feel it's worth the read if you plan to invest in the stock market. Also, it reads very well and is simply enjoyable.
21 von 23 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Millions will rush to purchase a copy but how many will actually read it and then apply what they learn? 13. August 2014
Von Robert Morris - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Here is a new edition of a book first published in 1969 and, until recently, out-of-print. It consists of 12 "stories" written by John Brooks (1920-1993) that first appeared in The New Yorker. It is one of Warren Buffett's two favorite books, the other being Benjamin Graham's The Intelligent Investor. About 20 years ago, Buffett gave his copy of it to Bill Gates who mentioned that in a Wall Street Journal (July 11, 2014). Now another lemming stampede is underway.

Contrary to what many people apparently believe, however, the significance of this book has much less to do with either Buffett or Gates than it does with the value of Brooks' insights and how well he presents them. In my opinion, why Buffett and Gates think so highly of this book is of far greater importance than the fact they do so. I had read each of the essays as they appeared in the magazine and then re-read them recently after obtaining a copy of the new paperbound edition.

As I did so, I was again reminded of an incident that occurred years ago when one of Albert Einstein's colleagues at Princeton playfully chided him for asking the same questions every year on his final examinations. "Quite true. Each year, the answers are different."

Most of the historical material in Business Adventures is dated. How could it not be after 45 years? However, like Einstein's questions, the issues that Brooks discusses remain - if anything - more relevant today than they were in 1969. It is worth noting that the average length of the essays is about 37 pages. Brooks probes with surgical skill as he focuses on major crises in "the world of Wall Street" and what valuable lessons can be learned from each situation. Apparently Buffett and Gates took those lessons to heart.

These are among the subjects of greatest interest to me:

o Why the causes of the financial crisis in 1962 remain "unfathomable" but what the significance of that crisis seems to be, nonetheless

o The extent to which the failure of the Edsel suggests "a certain grandeur that success never knows"

o What an "ideal tax code" as conceived in 1969 shares in common with the 1913 income tax

o Why the decision handed down on August, 1968, by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit was "a famous victory for the S.E.C." and resulted in "an interesting experiment"

o The struggles at Xerox to cope with the challenges of "good citizenship" in the late-1960s during it rapid and substantial corporate growth

o One of the "most trying -- and in some ways most serious -- crises in the Stock Market's long history" and how it was resolved

o Lessons to be learned about ineffective corporate communications with the Justice Department, notably the initiatives of G.E. and its then chairman, Ralph Cordiner

o Business lessons to be learned from the stock fluctuations of Piggly Wiggly Stores, Inc. and from its founder/CEO, Clarence Saunders

0 David Eli Lilienthal and his relevance to the New Deal during the Roosevelt administrations and his subsequent impact on Wall Street

o What Brooks learned about corporate leadership and management while attending annual meetings of various corporations

Note: Berkshire Hathaway's annual meetings offer compelling evidence of what Buffett learned from the tenth chapter, "Stockholder Season: Annual Meetings and Corporate Power" (Pages 315-337).

o Donald W. Wohlgemuth's historical -- and symbolic - significance after "almost six months in the toils of the law"

o The special significance of Charles Coombs and Alfred Hayes, especially with regard to "saving" the pound from devaluation

John Brooks was a superb journalist, one who possessed several of the skills of a world's class anthropologist, skills that are evident in these and other articles for The New Yorker as well as in his books, notably The Go-Go Years: The Drama and Crashing Finale of Wall Street's Bullish 60s (1999) and Once in Golconda: A True Drama of Wall Street 1920-1938 (also 1999). He was also a master raconteur, a teller of tales about the major characters on Wall Street, the motives that drove them, the challenges they faced, the conflicts they created or endured, and finally, their significance within a realm that includes but extends far beyond lower Manhattan.

With regard to Business Adventures, it is possible to determine the number of copies that are sold of the new paperbound and digital versions but not how many of those who purchase one or both will read all, most, or only some (if any) of the material. Meanwhile, FYI, Amazon offers three used copies of the hardbound edition for $1,400, $2,450, and $2,500. Buffett once observed, "Price is what you charge. Value is what others think it's worth." Whatever the cost of the container, the value of this material is incalculable.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen I'm not sure why this was such a highly rated book 14. Dezember 2014
Von Robert Kirk - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I read somewhere that Bill Gates loves this book and I decided to give it a go. Well, after reading this book I simply don't get the excitement. The book has stories that are tremendously dated and even the pearls of wisdom didn't seem to be too useful. I wanted to like it and find it valuable but I simply value my time too much.
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