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Burning Chrome
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 9. März 2000
From the man who wrote the classic cyberpunk novel, Burning Chrome is a collection of early Williami Gibson short stories, each one breaking new ground in the science fiction world. Gibson fans will immediately recognize the scenery of these dark but fascinating tales of the possibilities of the future. Neuromancer fans will recognize a few names as well: Molly, one of Gibson's most interesting characters, makes her debut in Johnny Mnemonic, the story of a man who stores data in his head but just accepted a package others will kill for; in the title story, where Gibson reveals his awesome vision of the future of data networks, Bobby Quine, hacker extraordinaire who is mentioned in Neuromancer as Case's teacher, decides that the Net isn't big enough for him and his rival. Gibson scores a major victory with these stories, showing us not only what might be, but what will be.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 29. November 1999
I think William Gibson is probably the best pure *writer* that I have read for years. I don't think, on the other hand, that his fiction is the best that SF has produced--but his deliverance of the stories is his strong point. His prose has been polished to the point that it sparkles and contains more than a good deal of poetry. Not only is his language poetic, but also are his images, especially his depiction of cyberspace with all its colorful towers of data.
As far as Gibson's fiction is concerned it is always interesting, often relevant, and on occasion cathartic. Most of his stories seem to take on the same sort of tone, that stemming from the "hard-boiled" tradition. Stories like "Johnny Mnemonic" and "Burning Chrome" best exemplify this particular brand of story. But Gibson also pulls a few surprizes out of his hat and delivers stories that are highly experimental and center around character study rather than high-tempo, action-packed adventure stories. "The Winter Market" in particular struck me as especially brilliant. His focus in the story was not the neat gadgetry that was represented by the "exoskeleton" worn by one of the characters, it was how this shaped this character and effected her life. But Gibson doesn't stop there, he gives us a cast of strong characters and plenty of interaction between them. And this is what really made the story interesting for me. The sf elements are there, but the story has a great deal of universality in its portrayol of real people in situations we can relate to.
I also thought that "Hinterlands" and "The Gernsback Continuum" were very interesting stories. "Hinterlands", like "The Winter Market", tells a real character oriented story, and "The Gernsback Continuum" is unlike any other story I've ever read. All of Gibson's stories are well written, but these stories in particular established his reputation in my mind.
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am 5. Oktober 1997
Nestled between the white-hot defining Cyberpunk of Neuromancer and the flashy diamond life of Mona Lisa Overdrive, "Burning Chrome" is just a beautiful, wonderful thing, and easily the best written of the trilogy (and the Burning Chrome sprawl stories). E.g.:
- The faces he woke with in the world's hotels were like God's own hood ornaments.
- And, for an instant, she stared directly into those soft blue eyes and knew, with an instinctive mammalian certainty, that the exceedingly rich were no longer even remotely human.
Actually seeing Cornell boxes in the flesh (Seattle Art Museum) was a let-down after the evocative descriptions in the book:
- The box was a universe, a poem, frozen on the boundaries of human experience.
Gibson is off the scale on this book, especially on the third re-reading when you've learned the maze in Neuromancer and assembled the fragments in MLO. And although it lacks the classic cyberpunk edge, it has the best pure action sequence of all the books, heck, of anything made out of ASCII characters!:
- And then he was in the cockpit, breathing the new-car smell of long-chain monomers, the familiar scent of newly minted technology, and the girl was behind him, an awkward doll sprawled in the embrace of the g-web that Conroy had paid a San Diego arms dealer to install behind the pilot's web. The plane was quivering, a live thing, and as he squirmed deeper into his own web, he fumbled for the interface cable, found it, ripped the microsoft from his socket, and slid the cable-jack home.

Knowledge lit him like an arcade game, and he surged forward with the plane-ness of the jet, feeling the flexible airframe reshape itself for jump-off as the canopy whined smoothly down on its servos. The g-web ballooned around him, locking his limbs rigid, the gun still in his hand. "Go, motherfucker." But the jet already knew, and g-force crushed him down into the dark.
No one has ever done it better.
(These quotes are from the Voyager electronic book presentation of Neuromancer/Count Zero/Mona Lisa Overdrive, one of the many Gibson artifacts listed in the most complete Gibson bibliography- mediagraphy on the Web, at [...] ).
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am 31. Juli 2000
This collection of stories is anything but even; the tone of each story varies wildly, and it's sort of a mixed bag. But for the best stories in the lot, the book is more than worth it.
"Johnny Mnemonic", which puts the dreadful movie to shame, is a sort of prequel to Neuromancer, introducing the character of Molly when she was new to her work. "Burning Chrome" is a story about two cowboys, one of them Bobby Quine who later became Case's mentor, who pulled off the ultimate theft from an underworld queen.
But what really stand out in this collection are two other stories from different universes that could have come straight out of the Twilight Zone. "The Belonging Kind", one of Gibson's collaborations, is a thought-provoking glimpse at creatures that are neither human nor alien--and a little too much of both. "Hinterlands" is creepy beyond words, a story that plays on our deepest fears: Astronauts volunteer to be taken to a place where they will most likely return with some technological treasure, but at the cost of their own sanity; no one knows what's out there because no one who comes back ever tells--they kill themselves or become vegetables, without exception. These stories illustrate Gibson's versatility like nothing else; these two alone make the book worth owning.
Some of the stories just aren't as interesting, but they're so overshadowed by the greatness of the better ones that they're just not worth considering as part of a rating. Read it yourself and decide which stories you like better; it's a mixed bag, with probably a little something wonderful for everyone.
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am 14. Mai 2000
I think of this book as Gibson's original pencil sketches of the world in which his novels take place; this is to those, particularly the Sprawl trilogy, what watercolors are to the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
First, it does give you some basic ideas of the historical significance of names dropped without overt purpose in later books. Case in point: in _Neuromancer_, Case asks whether Bobby Quine will participate in the games conceived by Armitage and his handlers, and Molly replies in a stern, negative tone about him. Until you read this, Quine remains a cipher in the building mythos, a legendary afterthought that compels admiration from the characters but not long enough for an explanation of who he is.
Second, it shows that William Gibson did work to refine his craft before he began writing novels. While he has made further refinements in his writing since, the leap between _Burning Chrome_ and _Neuromancer_ is apparent.
"The sky was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel." Very few science-fiction novels have one sentence to compare with that one, and you won't find one in _Burning Chrome_. However, you will see the pre-novel works that made such beautiful writing possible.
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am 1. Dezember 1998
Gibson's hard-edged, fast paced style is brilliant, but erratic. However, to me the fact that his work is hit or miss is acceptable, because he has some work under his belt that is nothing short of astounding in its ability to connect and provoke both an emotional response and an incredible desire to keep turning to the next page. For example: the Short story Burning Chrome, to me, is nothing less than the best short story ever written. It's all there: complicated characters, violence, romance, the hi-tech world he's created that I find fascinating; and, above all, it's engrossing to the point of peaking your interest on the first sentance and keeping it there for the rest of the story. Idoru? That was some nonsense. It was everything that Burning Chrome wasn't: slow, uninteresting, and the main characters were unappealing. Count Zero? Nueromancer? Again, brilliant. The Difference Engine? Well, let's just forget about that one. Despite the flaws of certain work I'm counting down the days until Gibson releases a new piece of writing, 'cause I got a feeling it will probably something I can really sink my proverbial teeth into.
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am 13. Juli 1999
Ein typischer Gibson. Eine Sammlung von... ähh... zehn Kurzgeschichten, die einen sofort in ihren Bann zieht. Gibson zieht wieder alle Register, was die sofortige total immersion angeht, und stellt eine glaubwürdige Zukunft dar, die nicht unbedingt Endzeit ist, aber eine ziemliche Hoffnungslosigkeit ausstrahlt. Kurzgeschichten haben zwar (in meinen Augen) das typische Kurzgeschichtenproblem, nämlich daß sie zu früh aufhören, aber in so einer Sammlung verstärkt das ihre Wirkung nur noch weiter. Wenn man von üblicher Science-Fiction mit Raumschiffen, Lasern und Imperien die Nase voll hat, ist das eine mehr als willkommene Abwechslung. Hier bedienen sich die Personen völlig unbewußt ihrer ganzen tollen Technik, nur um das zu tun, was sie vorher auch schon konnten: sich auf's Kreuz legen. Wenn man der Meinung ist, genug in seinem Leben zu machen, sollte man mal so ein Buch lesen und sich nachher nochmal diese Frage stellen - zumeist stellt man fest, daß es (Science-Fiction hin oder her) noch eine ganze Menge interessanter Dinge zu tun gibt ;-) (Dies ist eine Amazon.de an der Uni-Studentenrezension.)
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am 13. Juli 1999
Ein typischer Gibson. Eine Sammlung von... ähh... zehn Kurzgeschichten, die einen sofort in ihren Bann zieht. Gibson zieht wieder alle Register, was die sofortige total immersion angeht, und stellt eine glaubwürdige Zukunft dar, die nicht unbedingt Endzeit ist, aber eine ziemliche Hoffnungslosigkeit ausstrahlt. Kurzgeschichten haben zwar (in meinen Augen) das typische Kurzgeschichtenproblem, nämlich daß sie zu früh aufhören, aber in so einer Sammlung verstärkt das ihre Wirkung nur noch weiter. Wenn man von üblicher Science-Fiction mit Raumschiffen, Lasern und Imperien die Nase voll hat, ist das eine mehr als willkommene Abwechslung. Hier bedienen sich die Personen völlig unbewußt ihrer ganzen tollen Technik, nur um das zu tun, was sie vorher auch schon konnten: sich auf's Kreuz legen. Wenn man der Meinung ist, genug in seinem Leben zu machen, sollte man mal so ein Buch lesen und sich nachher nochmal diese Frage stellen - zumeist stellt man fest, daß es (Science-Fiction hin oder her) noch eine ganze Menge interessanter Dinge zu tun gibt ;-) (Dies ist eine Amazon.de an der Uni-Studentenrezension.)
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am 25. November 1999
This is a great collection of short stories. I admit I didn't like all of them equally, but that is a matter of taste--I think Gibson is a gifted writer, and 'Dogfight' is one of the best short stories I have ever read. I think it will turn up in anthologies one day along with 'To Build a Fire.' It is too bad that people compare the Internet to cyberspace and think that Gibson has nothing left to write about anymore. I only hope that he will branch out and flex his talent in writing about other themes in SF. If you are reading this, Mr. Gibson: You have a ton of good stories in you, just don't let people pin you to cyberspace SF.
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am 24. November 1999
If anything, these short stories - particularly the Sprawl stories, "Johnny Mnemonic", "New Rose Hotel" and "Burning Chrome" - are even more brilliant than "Neuromancer". Gibson's squashed, baroque style is perfectly suited to the short story format, leaving you in a sort of floundering metaphysical dizziness, even though they're only a few pages long.
Better still, those who complain at Gibson's "hard to get into" plots can now more easily read the stories several times over. Each timw will reveal more.
Real masterpieces.
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