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British Battleships 1939-45 (2): Nelson and King George V Classes (New Vanguard, Band 160) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 22. September 2009


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British Battleships 1939-45 (2): Nelson and King George V Classes (New Vanguard, Band 160) + British Battleships 1939-45 (1): Queen Elizabeth and Royal Sovereign Classes (New Vanguard, Band 154) + British Heavy Cruisers 1939-45 (New Vanguard, Band 190)
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Produktbeschreibungen

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"The drawings, photographs, and artwork are first rate...The typical ship modeler can readily use these books as a good reference when building any of these important ships." - Rodger Cole, Model Shipwrights (November 2009)

"This title offers a comprehensive review of the seven battleships of the Nelson and King George V classes from their initial commissioning to their peacetime modifications in wartime service, detailed descriptions of the main armament of the ships will offer further analysis of individual battleships effectiveness discussing how the guns were manned when engaging the enemy. Moreover a specially commissioned artwork and a dramatic retelling of the battleship battles, this book will highlight what it was like on board for the sailors who risked their lives on the high seas." - Ken Williams, IPMS/USA (December 2009)

"All of Britain's battleship classes are covered in some detail as to the design and armament... This is all accompanied by some superb photos of the various ships and by the excellent art work of Tony Bryan and Paul Wright. This helps us to see how these ships improved over the years and the differences in the various classes. In all, it makes for an excellent primer on the subject and fully meets this reviewer's expectations of books in this series. If you want to learn about the subject, I know you will find it to be equally useful.  Buy with confidence." -Scott Van Aken, Modeling Madness/modelingmadness.com (December 2009)

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Angus Konstam is one of Osprey's most prolific authors, with over 30 published titles. He has also written more than 25 larger books for other publishers. His Osprey titles include British Battlecruisers 1939-45, British Motor Torpedo Boats 1939-45 (both in the New Vanguard Series), and a string of other nautical titles. His other works include Hunt the Bismark (Naval Institute Press, 2003), PT Boats (Ian Allen, 2005) and Warships (PRC, 2001). He has also written a 100 edition part-work series on Naval History for Osprey/Del Prado. His latest book is Blackbeard: America's Most Notorious Pirate (Wiley, 2006). A former naval officer, maritime archaeologist and maritime museum curator, Angus has a long and passionate love affair with the sea, maritime history and warships. For more details visit the author's website at www.anguskonstam.com The author lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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10 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Both More and Less Than Advertised 5. Oktober 2009
Von Jonathan Lupton - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This book actually covers more than the two battleship classes described in the title. It also gives nearly two pages to HMS Vanguard, a battleship completed after World War II was over, and the Lion class, which were laid down in 1939 but never completed.

If you know little about these four classes of British battleships, this title is a readable, reasonably well-illustrated, and informative introduction. If you are already knowledgeable, you may be disappointed. I believe author Konstam spread his effort too thinly. By giving background on Vanguard and the Lion class, he lost the opportunity to give the kind of depth I wanted on the King George V class.

The King George V class ships were vital participants in World War II. Three of them were involved in surface actions against enemy battleships. Their protection incorporated the lessons of Jutland, meaning they were well-protected against shellfire. On the other hand, Prince of Wales succumbed to just five torpedoes in the South China Sea, suggesting flotation survival was not ideal. Yet this vital class was given barely over five pages of text; insufficient to address valid questions about protection, seaworthiness, and firepower.

There are two "Range and Penetration" tables, comparing the capabilities of the 16-inch and 14-inch guns of the Nelson and King George V classes: range, gun elevation, angle of descent, and shell velocity. Despite the title, the tables give no information about actual shell penetration.

The author also makes an error on p. 11 when he describes Britain's proposed G3 battlecruisers and N3 battleships as "the first battleships in the world to adopt triple turrets" around the year 1920. They may have been the RN's first triple-turret ships, but by this time the Italian, Russian, and U.S. Navies had all commissioned triple-turret battleships. That said, the related discussion of the Washington Treaty, and its impact on the eccentric design of the battleships Nelson and Rodney, is probably the most insightful section of this book.

This title is simply not up to the standard of Mr. Konstam's earlier title about the Queen Elizabeth and Royal Sovereign classes, which covered a smaller topic with greater depth. Yet it still gives a nice overview of the modern battleships that comprised a vital cornerstone of Britain's survival in World War II's grim early years.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Too ambitious and needed an editor 22. März 2010
Von Nick Dowling - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book provides a useful brief overview of the British Nelson and King George V class battleships, as well as HMS Vanguard and the never built Lion class battleships. It's handsomely illustrated and provides well written and succinct accounts of the ships' development, operational history and key statistics. The coverage of the Nelson class is particularly strong, and Konstam makes a strong argument for considering these ships to have been successful and important assets during the war. Unlike some Osprey books, the book also features a useful bibliography.

However, for all that it's not a successful book. Its main problem is that it tries to cover too many topics in its allocated 48 pages - the Nelson and KGV classes would each easily warrant a book of this length given their interesting design and service histories and the Lion class and HMS Vanguard don't really fit into the scope of the book. As another reviewer has noted, this means that the coverage of all the ships is inadequate. As a result, this book is useful only as a starting point, and doesn't justify its price. In addition, the book is let down by some basic mistakes - on page 8 it's wrongly started that the German battleship Scharnhorst was Bismark's sister ship immediately after she's correctly identified as being the lead ship of her own class of battlecruisers and on page 42 its stated that HMS Rodney was sold for scrap before the date she was placed in reserve (1948 seems to have been confused with 1949). These obvious mistakes should have been caught by the author or editor, and raise concerns about the accuracy of the rest of the book's content (for instance, it seems likely that any typos in the data tables would have also gone uncorrected).
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Osprey Vanguard 18. Oktober 2010
Von Charles Stuckey - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This is a good, concise guide to these two classes of ships, and unlike later Vanguard books covers some of the developments and upgrades applied during the war. One disappointment was that it was obviously written from a traditional British historical viewpoint with a lot of reference to sinking the Bismark but a lot of glazing over of losses and shortcomings of these ships which other books in this series have covered nicely.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
a technical review of the Britans Semi modern/Modern ritten withDrednought class of Battleships and there operations during WW 2 1. November 2013
Von mark a. johnson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Well written with plenty of technical detail, well illustrated a joy to read ,I will be a Navel warship history buff for life
Good Introduction that Could Have Been Better 2. April 2014
Von J. R. Trtek - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This is the second of two Osprey books by the same author and illustrators about British battleships that served in World War II. The early volume dealt with those ships originally built during World War I, while this one focuses on the Nelson class, built in the the 1920s, and the George V class, ordered in the mid-thirties. On the whole, it's rather better than just okay as an introduction to the subject, despite a few errors, as noted by a couple other previous reviewers. Also, the author spends a couple valuable pages -- given the shortness of the book -- spending a quick look at the never-completed Lion class and the HMS Vanguard, the last Britsh battleship (or battleship, period) ever completed. Of course, one could argue that both ought to be included, since they are part of the battleship story of the period. In any case, despite quibbles, this remains a fine little first step in this topic.
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