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Bodies That Matter (Routledge Classics) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 4. April 2011


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 256 Seiten
  • Verlag: Routledge (4. April 2011)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 041561015X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415610155
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,8 x 1,5 x 21,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 10.496 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"As a philosopher of gender [Judith Butler] is unparalleled." - Village Voice "Butler gives us a new way to think about the materiality of the body in the discursive performity operative in the materialization of sex. Following a common move in postmodern feminism, Butler sets out to demolish the sex/gender distinction that has formed the mainstay of the de Beauvorian and radical feminism's notion that gender, as a cultural construction, could be critiqued and politicized against the givenness of the body's biological sex...What is new in Bodies That Matter is Butler's attempt to write more directly about race." - Signs "Extending the brilliant style of interrogation that made her 1990 book Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity a landmark of gender theory/queer theory, Butler here continues to refine our understandings of the complexly performative character of sexuality and gender and to trouble our assumptions about the inherent subversiveness of dissident sexualities... indispensable reading across the wide range of concerns that queer theory is currently addressing." - Artforum "What the implications/limitations of 'sexing' are and how the process works comprise the content of this strikingly perceptive book... Butler has written a most significant and provocative work that addresses issues of immediate social concern." - The Boston Book Review "A brilliant and original analysis." - Drucilla Cornell, Rutgers University, USA "...a classic." - Elizabeth Grosz

Synopsis

In "Bodies That Matter," Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in "Gender" "Trouble," Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain "sex" from the start, delimiting what counts as a viable sex. She offers a clarification of the notion of "performativity" introduced in "Gender Trouble" and explores the meaning of a citational politics. The text includes readings of Plato, Irigaray, Lacan, and Freud on the formation of materiality and bodily boundaries; "Paris is Burning," Nella Larsen's "Passing," and short stories by Willa Cather; along with a reconsideration of "performativity" and politics in feminist, queer, and radical democratic theory. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 15. März 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
This book clarifies much of Foucault was saying in History of Sexuality. Butler is careful, however, to not borrow the models Foucault uses, thereby, avoids some of the mistakes and gaps that occur in his thinking, namely the silence on women. Butler, more than Foucault, is not willing to settle the debate on sexuality merely as the obtaining and disseminating of pleasures and how those bodies perform them. Rather, she takes bodies as always already gender indeterminate and destablilizes their performatives further to show how bodies are marked by gender as well as race, class, sexulaity, etc. and how these categories are also destabilized within the perfomative. I highly recommend this book to feminist and queer theorists and well as anyone who is concerned about creating any sort of opposition to the reactionary right-wing forces that are attempting to further entrench their dominance over the rest of us.
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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von besman.1@osu.edu am 2. Dezember 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
When Judith Butler describes gender as performative, contrary to much of what is mistakenly thought out there, it is not about choice! It is not about choosing to put on a gender--as if it was a performance in the traditional or obvious way. The performativity of gender is meant to suggest--invoke--that gender is constituted by performative acts which repeated come to form, take shape, a "coherent" gender identity. Thus, Butler uses the performative to suggest that this coherency is false and that because of acts that disrupt the strict reads of gender--acts that occur naturally, perhaps daily, perhaps unacknowledged, gender comes to be seen/viewed as that which is only as stable as this performative function's stability is. Or put more simply, gender-as-stable is undermined by Butler by reading it through the performative--becuase it is never "performed" the same exactly. So, it is not that people can choose to perform a certain enumeration of gender, rather it is that noone precisely (actually) fulfills these gender identities that we have!
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Amazon.com: 14 Rezensionen
64 von 85 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Thought-provoking 15. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book clarifies much of Foucault was saying in History of Sexuality. Butler is careful, however, to not borrow the models Foucault uses, thereby, avoids some of the mistakes and gaps that occur in his thinking, namely the silence on women. Butler, more than Foucault, is not willing to settle the debate on sexuality merely as the obtaining and disseminating of pleasures and how those bodies perform them. Rather, she takes bodies as always already gender indeterminate and destablilizes their performatives further to show how bodies are marked by gender as well as race, class, sexulaity, etc. and how these categories are also destabilized within the perfomative. I highly recommend this book to feminist and queer theorists and well as anyone who is concerned about creating any sort of opposition to the reactionary right-wing forces that are attempting to further entrench their dominance over the rest of us.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Poses thought-provoking questions but the analysis leaves a lot to be desired 1. Mai 2012
Von Herbert L Calhoun - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book, an entirely new area for me, asks a number of penetrating and foundational questions about how the idea of gender has been socially constructed. Most of the answers that ensue from the articles included in this volume (albeit in a much more complicated way), mirror answers to similar questions that could and should also be raised about the social construction and arbitrary assignment of the category of "race." The main reason I bought this book was to see how gender formation theory even as it is embedded in heavy post-structionalist jargon, could inform my own attempts to understand how our societal processes have evolved to become so dependent on the artificial concept of race.

The discourse begins where it should, at the beginning and then it quickly ascends in complexity as it deconstructs the idea of gender as it has been handed down to us from "on high." Getting to the meat of the book, gender, even within a body of a particular morphological type, still derives most of it's meaning through arbitrary socialized assignment, the same as is the case with race: which is to say that it occurs not necessarily as a choice by the individual assigned to a particular category, but by the "powers that be," "from on high."

The question this arbitrariness poses in both cases, is general and far reaching: Given that both gender and race are socially constructed entirely through power relations, relations deeply embedded within our culture and in which normative constraints do the heavy lifting (with mainstream power backing them up), the authors then ask: "how might one formulate a "social project" that preserves gender (race) practices as sites of critical agency?" The articles do not give clear answers to this important question, but instead in my view engages in a new form of genderless machismo.

Moreover, in each case it is obvious from the context that the same questions could just as easily have been asked by the dominant or oppressing group as by the minority or aggrieved groups? This point is not necessarily just a minor theoretical consideration given that the immediate corollary to the last question is: How precisely are we to understand the ritualized and repetitious assignment process by which norms are used to produce and standardize not only the effects on gender (and in my case on race) but also the materiality of the category (sexual attributes in the case of gender and color in the case of race)? And finally it asks the next logical and perhaps the most important question of all: Can this process of arbitrary social assignments be turned on its head, or back on itself and reversed so that it rebounds in favor of those affected?

It is a serious question that is not often asked in exactly this way. Among other things (after wading through what seemed like tons of almost impenetrable post-structuralist analysis and jargon), it suggests that using the "ways of power" against itself may be the best answer?

I believe that at least this last question in the previous paragraph leads to a nontrivial but obvious answer: That since in both the case of gender and race the assignments occur under the duress of social and societal pressures, that is, to say as a result of the enforcement of norms on others by the greater more dominant powers of society, the obvious answer then is that "the ways of power will always rule the day, and will always win out?" Said another way: unless existing power arrangements are at least confounded, if not directly confronted and eventually defeated, the problem reduces to one of how best to blunt the effects of the greater powers that dominant groups use to rule society?

I believe once the articles in this book are stripped of all of their post-structuralist jargon and bombast, their strategy to reverse power arrangements, is a facile strategy and a facile answer to the questions pose in the setup piece, one whose essence sidesteps the main issue which is how power arrangements are to be settled. This new form of genderless chest beating and machismo does not exactly get the job done.

And on this point, may I refer interested readers to Andrew Smookler's beautifully written and penetrating book called "The parable of the Tribes: the Problem of Power in Social Evolution." Smookler's analysis gives systemic reasons why embarking on such a strategy of "power reversal," leaves scant hope for those bent on doing so to be hopeful. Invariably it results in a "lose-lose" cul de sac -- the "Black Power" movement being the perfect case in point.

Three stars only because the book does not follow closely the lead set in the introduction, and thus it does not hold together well. That, plus all the superfluous post-structuralist jargon, makes what could have been a seminal work, practically impenetrable.
13 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Material Bodies 11. Januar 2009
Von P. Nagy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
With the publication of Gender Trouble in 1990, Judith Butler spearheaded a movement in feminist theory which has become known as 'radical constructivism'. Taking its departures from psychoanalytic and poststructuralist theory, and also informed by speech-act theory, Gender Trouble contends (albeit with sophistication and nuance infinitely greater than this) that gender is not an internal essence, but one produced 'in anticipation' by a repeated and naturalised set of acts, behaviours and stylings. Gender and sexual categories are held in place by the restrictive norms of heterosexuality, but these can be revealed as artificial by their very citability -- as demonstrated in extremis by, for example, drag and camp performance.
In Bodies That Matter (1993) Butler extends and complicates the theories put forward in Gender Trouble to contend that not only gender, but the materiality of the body itself, is discursively and performatively produced. We cannot, therefore, speak of a natural, prelinguistic, 'given' body, because what we think we know about bodies is an effect rather than a cause of signification. As with Gender Trouble, this is not to say that bodies are entirely, unchangingly determined by language, but a recognition that, in Butler's words, there can be 'no reference to a pure body which is not at the same time a further formation of that body' (1993, p. 10). Referring to a body is thus, in quite a strict linguistic sense, always almost performative or constitutive, and governed largely (though not entirely) by habitual understandings and norms (such as heterosexism). Again, the citation and iterability of the norms that subjects are expected 'naturally' to embody belies their instability in a classic deconstructive manoeuvre: the natural or intelligible body shores itself up against, and thereby defines or summons the appearance of the deviant or unintelligible (just as the legitimate summons the illegitimate, the authentic the false, the proper the improper, and so forth). The 'performance' of alternative sexualities and gender identities both denaturalises normative suppositions, and pushes for the articulation of new bodily possibilities.
Butler outlines her theory of how bodies are produced, or materialised, in discourse, and clarifies the oft-cited notion of performativity in its twinned senses of speech-act and theatrical agency. The textual style in this instance is relatively straightforward by Butler's standards: her work is renowned for what can seem like a wilfully opaque syntax. This, however, is central to her critique, which is shot through with a relentless critical suspicion of the 'common sense' of linguistic transparency.
48 von 67 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Lacanian response 10. August 2004
Von S. Whitworth - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
When I first read this book, I was pleased to see that Butler was returning to the problem of "gender performativity" she raised in *Gender Trouble.* I do believe that she was misunderstood as having claimed in *Gender Trouble* that the performativity constitutive of gender implies an infinite "plasticity" or freedom from the constraints of gender. Yet after reading *Bodies,* I felt that she evaded the question with which she opened the book: in what way can the "materiality" of anatomical sex be construed as a "discursive limit" to ideological constructions of gender without being understood as existing outside of discourse? I believe that Butler is ultimately indecisive about the status of the materiality of sex as either a pre- or extra-discursive "hard kernel of the Real" or (just like gender) another aspect of discourse. This is what leads to her very wrong-headed "critique" of the concept of "objet petit a" in the work of Slavoj Zizek and Jacques Lacan, very complex work which she oversimplifies and accuses of "reifying" or "essentializing" sex. Any serious student of Lacan knows that the a-object of fantasy is anything but "essential." It phantasmatically "dresses up" (to use Lacan's words in Seminar 14) a primordial psychic "hole," an *absence* or pure negativity where a "grounding" for discourse ought to be but is *lacking.* It's a shame that a book such as this which begins with a rigorous intellectual question degenerates into a sort of psychoanalytic dilettantism.
Great for gender scholars 20. Dezember 2012
Von Jason Crockett - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Not as ground-breaking as Gender Trouble, but a worthy follow-up that should be required reading for gender scholars. For the more casual reader, Butler's obtuse writing style may get in the way, but worth tackling if you're passionate about issues around gender and sexuality.
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