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Beyond the Core: Expand Your Market Without Abandoning Your Roots (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 1. Dezember 2003


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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 240 Seiten
  • Verlag: Harvard Business Review Press (1. Dezember 2003)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1578519519
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578519514
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 24,1 x 16,3 x 2,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 2.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 96.151 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Synopsis

This book provides proven approaches - and guidance on how and when to use them - for achieving profitable growth away from your core business. Now, in "Beyond the Core", Zook explains how executives can increase the odds of successful expansion once their core business no longer provides sufficient new growth. Based on a massive international research study focusing on adjacency moves, Zook reveals the ideal adjacency growth pattern that successful growth companies employ; how companies can develop their own "repeatable formula" for profitable growth; and guidance on when adjacency moves are smart, and how to choose the right adjacency move for a range of business situations.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Chris Zook is a Director of Bain & Company and leads the company's Global Strategy Practice. He resides in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Einleitungssatz
"Like an interminable tennis rally on the red clay of nearby Roland Garros, the verbal volleys flew across the table in the warm and crowded boardroom late that Paris afternoon." Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT am 27. April 2004
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Many people who have been burned by going into new areas will grade this as five-stars for encouraging caution in expanding a company's scope. If that's all you want from a book, this is a five-star book. If you want to learn what the exact lesson is, and why that lesson is true, you'll have to look elsewhere however. If you want to learn how to beat the odds in this area, you will also have to look elsewhere.

I found Profit from the Core to be a directionless mishmash of data without firm definitions that repeatedly espoused the idea of "stick to your knitting." As a result, I took up Beyond the Core with great trepidation. At first blush, Beyond the Core seemed to cure some of the peripheral problems of Profit from the Core . . . until I began to notice how almost all of the important examples of continuing business model innovation had been excluded that seemed to fit all of the criteria (except perhaps being willing to be interviewed by the author). Mr. Zook continues to avoid defining what "the core" is, so that basic problem continues.

The book's message is "stick to your knitting . . . unless you have not choice . . . then don't go away from your cost advantages and knowledge." If you want to know a little more about that message, you can read all of the key points in the book summarized in the Afterword on pages 189-192 in less than five minutes.

The book will mainly be helpful to those who are thinking about making unrelated acquisitions. The advice: Don't do it! The odds are way against you . . . but even the most unrelated acquisitions sometimes work (GE bought NBC and has done well with it, for example). The book lacks clear direction for how some overcome the odds.
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Amazon.com: 18 Rezensionen
17 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Not All Adjacencies Are Appropriate 12. Februar 2004
Von Robert Morris - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Perhaps you have already read Profit From the Core: Growth Strategy in the Age of Turbulence which Zook co-authored with James Allen. It was based on rigorous research which revealed the key strategic decisions that most often determine growth or stagnation in business. They note: "Central to our findings are three ideas: the concept of the core business and its boundaries; the idea that every business has a level of full-potential performance that usually exceeds what the company imagines; and the idea that performance-yield loss occurs at many levels, from strategy to leadership to organizational capabilities to execution." In the five chapters which follow, Zook (with Allen) examines "the types of strategic business decisions that most often seem to tilt the odds of future success or failure." Zook correctly suggests in this book that many organizations cannot resist the appeal ("the siren's song") of "miracle cures" of their problems. Zook focuses entirely on what has been verified in real-world experience, on what is practical, and on what will reliably achieve the desired results of sound strategic decisions.
In the first chapter of this book, Zook discusses what he calls "the growth crisis" which many (most?) organizations encounter. He observes, "Finding or maintaining a source of sustained and profitable growth has become the number one concern of most CEOs. And moves that push out the boundaries of their core business into 'adjacencies' are where they are most often look these days." I agree with Zook that these strategies have three distinctive features: "First, they are of significant size, or they can lead to a sequence of related adjacency moves that generate substantial growth. Second. they build on., indeed are bolted on, a strong core business. Thus the adjacent area draws from the strength of the core and at the same time may serve to reinforce or defend that core. Third, adjacency strategies are a journey into the unknown, a true extension of the core, a pushing out of the boundaries, a step-up in risk from typical forms of organic growth." Much of the material in this brilliant book is guided and informed by what Zook claims is "the new math of profitable growth." Specifics are best provided by Zook himself.
Zook presumes that those who read this book already know what a core business is, and more specifically, what the core business is of their respective organizations. Given his objectives, that assumption is probably necessary so that he can explore the opportunities which (key word) appropriate adjencies offer. Fair enough. However, my own experience suggests that companies frequently extend the boundaries of a core business without fully understanding what that core business is. Railroads probably offer the best example. Only much too late (if then) did senior-level executives at major railroads realize that their core business was transporting people and cargo, NOT "railroading." Obviously, trains are confined to the tracks as are ships to the water and trucks to the roadways over which they proceed. Early on, what if owners of railroads and their associates had addressed questions such as those Zook poses in his Preface (Page ix)? Had they done so, presumably they would have recognized appropriate adjacencies which include taxi cabs, Super Shuttle, local delivery services, and "overnight" delivery services (e.g. DHL, FedEx, and UPS). While they're at it, why not own or forge strategic partnerships with over-the-road trucking companies and cargo airlines? Given the central locations of railroad stations in major metropolitan areas, it would have been easy enough to combine a full-range of travel services within an upscale retail mall.
The question to ask, therefore, is not what an organization's core business is. Rather, what could AND SHOULD it be? The correct answer to that question is important, of course, because without a proper core, there can be chaos. Also, the correct answer suggests appropriate adjacencies by which to achieve and then sustain increasingly more profitable growth.
In the Afterword, Zook imagines himself engaged in what he calls the proverbial "elevator" conversation during which he reviews the "key messages" contained within his book. It serves no good purpose to list them here because each must be carefully considered within a meticulously formulated context. However, once the book has been read, I strongly recommend that all of these "key messages" be reviewed on a monthly (if not weekly) basis. For decision-makers in at least some companies, this may well prove to be the most valuable book they have read in recent years.
34 von 42 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Questionable Choice of Examples and Lack of Definitions! 15. März 2004
Von Donald Mitchell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Many people who have been burned by going into new areas will grade this as five-stars for encouraging caution in expanding a company's scope. If that's all you want from a book, this is a five-star book. If you want to learn what the exact lesson is, and why that lesson is true, you'll have to look elsewhere however. If you want to learn how to beat the odds in this area, you will also have to look elsewhere.
I found Profit from the Core to be a directionless mishmash of data without firm definitions that repeatedly espoused the idea of "stick to your knitting." As a result, I took up Beyond the Core with great trepidation. At first blush, Beyond the Core seemed to cure some of the peripheral problems of Profit from the Core . . . until I began to notice how almost all of the important examples of continuing business model innovation had been excluded that seemed to fit all of the criteria (except perhaps being willing to be interviewed by the author). Mr. Zook continues to avoid defining what "the core" is, so that basic problem continues.
The book's message is "stick to your knitting . . . unless you have not choice . . . then don't go away from your cost advantages and knowledge." If you want to know a little more about that message, you can read all of the key points in the book summarized in the Afterword on pages 189-192 in less than five minutes.
The book will mainly be helpful to those who are thinking about making unrelated acquisitions. The advice: Don't do it! The odds are way against you . . . but even the most unrelated acquisitions sometimes work (GE bought NBC and has done well with it, for example). The book lacks clear direction for how some overcome the odds.
The book was also curiously silent about how companies can use small experiments to test their way into new areas. That's the way that most firms expand beyond their core.
The methodology looks very much like those employed in Build to Last and Good to Great . . . but don't believe it. Cases were selected in part based on whether Mr. Zook could interview the companies. So it's really a subjective sample. So take the conclusions with a selective grain of salt. Here are some of the cases of those who have prospered with expanding into new areas that seem to fit the Zook criteria but don't appear in the book: Beckman Coulter; Berkshire Hathaway; Clear Channel Communications; Education Management; GE; Iron Mountain; Nucor; Paychex; Sony; Virgin Group; Xilinx; and Zebra Technologies. It's not surprising that the book fails to describe the discipline of continual business model improvement as a best practice . . . a serious omission for this subject.
Ultimately, I think the flaw behind the book is to look at moving "beyond the core" separately from looking "at the core." If the two books had been combined into one that looked at how to outperform the competition, there would have been the basis of helpful insights. Or, this book could have been scoped down into how to grow into new areas with internal development activities versus acquisitions. That would have been helpful. But with the focus of "beyond the core," you are left in a never-never land that you may not want to be in. The other interesting question that could have been addressed is how companies prospered by eliminating the old core and replacing it with a new one through acquisition as a number of companies have.
As I thought about why the author might have chosen this direction, I realized that it may be an unconscious use of the older ways of strategic thinking. Those analytical schemes separated thinking about existing business areas from entering new ones. For some time though, most strategic thinkers have emphasized seeing the questions as connected. You should, for example, be pursuing your best opportunities. That means comparing all choices in some manner at the same time.
The other problem with data-heavy studies like this one is that you are relying on backward impressions (with 20-20 hindsight). Studies of best practices are best done by looking at the decisions and actions when they are made . . . and then measuring the results to see what happens. Interviews taken at such times reveal much different information than the neat success stories spun after the fact. Clayton Christensen does a good job of explaining this issue in chapter one of his new book, The Innovator's Solution.
As I finished the book, I began to think about the many unsuccessful unrelated acquisitions that I have run into among companies. In almost every case, I remember reading a thick book by a name consulting firm that had explained at the time of the purchase why the acquisition could not miss. Perhaps a follow on for this book would be how to avoid bad advice in evaluating acquisitions.
8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Good second act 19. November 2003
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I read Mr. Zook's first book, "Profit From The Core" and really enjoyed it. The interpretation of the data was very compelling and it was a great call-to-arms for companies to re-focus on top-line growth. But as much as I liked the first book, I thought it lacked enough "how to" for my tastes. Well, I found lots of practical guidance in Mr. Zook's latest treatise on adjacency growth, "Beyond The Core". And if you're one of those "practical people" like me, I think you'll like it too.
I found the aspects I liked from the first book in this book as well - lots of data (more importantly, lots of good analysis and interpretation of the data) and lots of company examples (both successes and failures). Say what you will about strategy consultants like Mr. Zook and his project teams at Bain & Company but at least the information provided in "Beyond The Core" is from his first-hand experience with these companies and not a compilation of assorted academic musings or second-hand interpretations of publicly-available data. I find these assertion-heavy, point of view-based books pretty ho-hum.
But what I really enjoyed about "Beyond The Core" was, first, the treatment of different types of adjacencies (e.g., moves into new markets, customers, channels, business models, "white spaces", etc.) and the specific guidance of what makes sense in each situation, and second, the five most common adjacency mistakes that companies make. I found the latter discussion particularly useful. Remember - I'm the "practical guy".
As far as business books go, this is good stuff.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Business Growth Brought to Life 4. Januar 2004
Von Craig Stanovich - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Chris Zook has produced his second excellent resource that is of great value to anyone who has a genuine interest in the workings of business. As a small business owner, I found this work both relevant and thought provoking.
Unlike so many business books, which are heavy on anecdotes and light on research, Zook draws his conclusions based upon in-depth studies of 100 businesses and numerous interviews with CEOs. The data is concisely brought to life with understandable and practical illustrations and conclusions, of all which are aided by some very compelling charts and graphs.
Beyond the Core offers a very useful framework for carefully thinking about how growth may be found and cultivated in areas outside of the core business - a virtual roadmap of business in the 21st century!
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Solid theory, great examples! 9. Dezember 2003
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Beyond the Core is Chris Zook's follow up to Profit From the Core, the crux of which is that for a company to achieve successful growth it must fully develop it's core business.
Beyond the Core focuses on finding the next wave of growth through "adjacent" moves, and illustrates its thesis with a series of colorful and engaging examples. Beyond the Core is down to earth business thinking without unnecessary pomp and circumstance, and ultimately delivers a satisfying business growth philosophy.
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