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Ben & Jerry's Double Dip: Lead with Your Values and Make Money Too [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Ben Cohen , Jerry Greenfield
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Kurzbeschreibung

Mai 1997
"If it's not fun, why do it?"

For many years Ben & Jerry's has donated 7.5 percent of its annual pretax profits to charitable causes -- the highest percentage of any publicly-held company. Yet the company has become an even more powerful agent for social change by embracing a "values-led" business philosophy. Values-led business is based on the idea that business, which has become the most powerful force in society, has to accept responsibility for the welfare of that society and the people in it. Values-led business is more encompassing and therefore more effective than philosophy alone. It also seeks to maximize its impact by integrating socially beneficial actions into as many of its day-to-day activities as possible from raw materials to retailing. In order to do that, values must guide a company's mission statement, strategy and operating plan.

Ben and Jerry write: "When we first decided to open an ice cream parlor, our goals were pretty modest. With this book we admit to having greater aspirations. We're hoping that reading it will free up a lot of people to do what their hearts and souls have been aching to do -- integrate social values into their daily business activities. If you're a business person reading this book, we hope to demonstrate that there's an alternative to the status quo. We hope you'll see that it's possible to run a business in a way that proactively supports society, and that as you integrate your values more and more, you'll be just as profitable., if not more so. If you're a shareholder, an employee, or a customer, we hope to convince you to bring those values to your interactions with business. We hope to help you to become aware that there's adifferent, more caring way for business to be -- and as employees, customers, and shareholders, to demand that business be that way."


Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 300 Seiten
  • Verlag: Simon & Schuster Ltd; Auflage: First Printing (Mai 1997)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0684834995
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684834993
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 24,2 x 16,2 x 2,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 870.810 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Synopsis

In this text, the authors explain their business method, that of "values-led business", and how anyone who owns, works for, invests in, or shops with a company might help make it a socially responsible business using this method.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, cofounders of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc., opened their first ice cream shop in Vermont in 1978. Today, Ben & Jerry's Homemade is a $160 million company and contributes 7.5% of its pre-tax earnings to charity.

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Great Guys, Great Company 18. Juni 1999
Format:Hörkassette
I listened to this book on audiotape. Ben and Jerry discuss how the idea of an Ice Cream Shop came about, how it almost didn't happen, then how it became a growing successful business. They tell the business side as well as the human side of their venture, with actual stories, from both points of view. They stressed the importance of running a company that was fun to work at, that cared about the employees, and gave back to the community. Together they explain what a values lead company is all about, and why employees want to be a part of their team. Then they discuss how they and other values lead companies work together to help charitable causes and why it is so important to them. I was fascinated with their sincere ongoing dedication to charitable causes and their devotion to employee satisfaction. This was a great book, very inspiring from the business point of view and heart warming as well.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
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8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great Guys, Great Company 18. Juni 1999
Von Theresa Wallingford - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Hörkassette
I listened to this book on audiotape. Ben and Jerry discuss how the idea of an Ice Cream Shop came about, how it almost didn't happen, then how it became a growing successful business. They tell the business side as well as the human side of their venture, with actual stories, from both points of view. They stressed the importance of running a company that was fun to work at, that cared about the employees, and gave back to the community. Together they explain what a values lead company is all about, and why employees want to be a part of their team. Then they discuss how they and other values lead companies work together to help charitable causes and why it is so important to them. I was fascinated with their sincere ongoing dedication to charitable causes and their devotion to employee satisfaction. This was a great book, very inspiring from the business point of view and heart warming as well.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Great story of a different kind of company 20. Juni 2000
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Here is the story of how two guys built a company that 1) Makes money, and 2) has a social conscience. It details the dilemna's, decisions, and trade-offs that Ben and Jerry's had to make between the myriad of forces that regularly tug at the company because of its mission, and the realities of the marketplace. For example, it shows how B&J dealt with their brownie supplier in inner city New York when the supplier couldn't handle the capacity and quality that B&J required.
Very inspirational AND very pragmatic!
4.0 von 5 Sternen Ben & Jerry are revolutionaries! 3. Juli 2013
Von petesea - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
It is interesting to go back "in history" and read about one of the first socially aware companies and how it got to those values. Thankfully, a lot of these concepts have become "mainstream" as Ben & Jerry hoped. The read can be choppy with dialog from Ben & Jerry and some other socially aware entrepreneurs interspersed with the text.
2 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen enjoyable portrayal of the "other" side of big business 21. Juli 2000
Von Y. Patel - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
great book for those who HATE big business and its "selfishness". Although the book, I think, is poorly written at times, it is always very interesting as it offers a perspective one NEVER hears about in the business section of the newspaper or in business/management books. More execs should read this and thing long and hard about their "social mission", as well as their strategies. The social effort seems to have worked well for B&J.
10 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen For people who can't figure out why you get 79% off 26. August 2000
Von "chris9999" - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
It's not just that Ben and Jerry's ideas are stupid; it's that these guys don't practice what they preach. There is an article that some naïve reviewers on this board should read. It's called "The Evil Empire" in the New Republic (hardly the voice of capitalism or the political right). Amazingly the New Republic finds Ben and Jerry's arrogance just too hard to swallow.
What does the article have to say?
On Ben and Jerry's success:
"With the publicity came the inevitable backlash: that Ben and Jerry are nothing more than New Age scam artists, feeding social consciousness to gullible yuppies and pocketing the cash. The scarier truth may be that they've scammed themselves. Like their fortysomething followers, they believe the most flattering image of themselves: that, despite their millions, they haven't sold out."
How Ben and Jerry discovered why CEOs get paid big salaries:
This doesn't mean the company is built on scandalous lies--just little white lies, mutual delusions that keep everyone happy. For example, one tenet of caring capitalism is to be "real," to "connect with the customer." This spirit is what drove the company's offbeat search for a new CEO. Early last summer, Ben and Jerry held a press conference to announce that Ben would step down as CEO. Profits had plummeted, the superpremium ice cream market was shrinking; in short, the company had grown too complicated for a "multi-college dropout and failed pottery teacher to run," Ben announced. What pained him most was the company's decision to give up the salary cap that had limited the top executive's salary to seven times that of the lowest-paid employee, the $8 an hour scooper (a sacrifice that had always obscured Ben's millions in stock shares).
And my favorite section of the Article when Ben and Jerry show their hypocracy for all the world to see:
"Then there are the inner-city initiatives that fail. If there are any doubts about B&J's bloodless business instincts, they can be dispelled by another holy man, the Reverend James Carter, who crossed the company's path in 1992. Back then, Carter ran a modest New Jersey bakery called LaSoul, where recovering addicts churned out pumpkin pies for the local groceries. A week after he saw Ben on ABC's "20/20," Carter packed up a trunk full of pies and drove to the company headquarters. Ben loved both the pies and "Reverend Carter's vision of building a sound business." In three weeks, Carter had a letter of intent to do business with the company, which he showed to the bank to borrow money for equipment. Ben flew down to New Jersey to tape a TV show of himself helping ex-addicts mix batches of the new Apple Pie frozen yogurt.
After two years, however, sales of the flavor were flagging. In May 1994, Ben and Jerry's drastically decreased its orders, leaving Carter with freezers full of pies. Frantic, Carter laid off all but two employees and called Ben. The next day, Ben flew to New Jersey, "sat down, looked them straight in the eye," and, recalls Carter, said, "Don't worry, we'll stick with you." But orders never picked up, and, this June, Carter received a letter from the company, by fax, that congratulated him on his "good works" and canceled all remaining orders. He was left half a million dollars in debt. "It's pretty cute, this social mission," Carter says bitterly. "But the bottom line is, Ben and Jerry's buried my company."
Ask Ben about the incident, and he sounds more like Gordon Gecko than Robin Hood: "We told Jim to find more customers. We gave him six months' notice." When the normally upbeat Alan Parker is reminded of a spreadsheet dated November 11, 1994, that projected $500,000 worth of orders from LaSoul in 1995, he replies: "That spreadsheet was given to him as a best-case scenario for volume expectations. Nothing about that memo could be construed as a firm commitment, and it's really disingenuous for him to cite it." Do they feel at all responsible? "Sure, we feel sad," says Parker. "But our sadness is tempered with `why are we being blamed?' We worked closely with him to make our demands on him easier, and that's not something many customers would do for their suppliers. In the end, LaSoul was just not a viable business enterprise."
Anyway for those who would rather read a true story than this useless book I suggest getting a hold of the whole article:
Source: New Republic, 9/11/95, Vol. 213 Issue 11, p22, 4p, 1 cartoon Author(s): Rosin, Hanna
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