In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Thin... auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder mit einer unserer kostenlosen Kindle Lese-Apps sofort zu lesen anfangen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden
 

Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly)) [Kindle Edition]

Andy Oram , Greg Wilson
3.4 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (11 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 20,96 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Kostenlose Kindle-Leseanwendung Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.

Geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse oder Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 20,96  
Taschenbuch EUR 27,95  


Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

How do the experts solve difficult problems in software development? In this unique and insightful book, leading computer scientists offer case studies that reveal how they found unusual, carefully designed solutions to high-profile projects. You will be able to look over the shoulder of major coding and design experts to see problems through their eyes.

This is not simply another design patterns book, or another software engineering treatise on the right and wrong way to do things. The authors think aloud as they work through their project's architecture, the tradeoffs made in its construction, and when it was important to break rules.
This book contains 33 chapters contributed by Brian Kernighan, KarlFogel, Jon Bentley, Tim Bray, Elliotte Rusty Harold, Michael Feathers,Alberto Savoia, Charles Petzold, Douglas Crockford, Henry S. Warren,Jr., Ashish Gulhati, Lincoln Stein, Jim Kent, Jack Dongarra and PiotrLuszczek, Adam Kolawa, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Diomidis Spinellis, AndrewKuchling, Travis E. Oliphant, Ronald Mak, Rogerio Atem de Carvalho andRafael Monnerat, Bryan Cantrill, Jeff Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat, SimonPeyton Jones, Kent Dybvig, William Otte and Douglas C. Schmidt, AndrewPatzer, Andreas Zeller, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Arun Mehta, TV Raman,Laura Wingerd and Christopher Seiwald, and Brian Hayes.
Beautiful Code is an opportunity for master coders to tell their story. All author royalties will be donated to Amnesty International.

Synopsis

How do the experts solve difficult problems in software development? In this unique and insightful book, leading computer scientists offer case studies that reveal how they found unusual, carefully designed solutions to high-profile projects. You will be able to look over the shoulder of major coding and design experts to see problems through their eyes. This is not simply another design patterns book, or another software engineering treatise on the right and wrong way to do things. The authors think aloud as they work through their project's architecture, the tradeoffs made in its construction, and when it was important to break rules. "Beautiful Code" is an opportunity for master coders to tell their story. All author royalties will be donated to Amnesty International. The book includes the following contributions: "Beautiful Brevity: Rob Pike's Regular Expression Matcher" by Brian Kernighan, Department of Computer Science, Princeton University; "Subversion's Delta Editor: Interface as Ontology" by Karl Fogel, editor of "QuestionCopyright.org", Co-founder of Cyclic Software, the first company offering commercial CVS support; "The Most Beautiful Code I Never Wrote" by Jon Bentley, Avaya Labs Research; "Finding Things" by Tim Bray, Director of Web Technologies at Sun Microsystems, co-inventor of XML 1.

0; "Correct, Beautiful, Fast (In That Order): Lessons From Designing XML Validators" by Elliotte Rusty Harold, Computer Science Department at Polytechnic University, author of "Java I/O, Java Network Programming", and "XML in a Nutshell" (O'Reilly); and, "The Framework for Integrated Test: Beauty through Fragility" by Michael Feathers, consultant at Object Mentor, author of "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" (Prentice Hall). It also includes: "Beautiful Tests" by Alberto Savoia, Chief Technology Officer, Agitar Software Inc; "On-the-Fly Code Generation for Image Processing" by Charles Petzold, author "Programming Windows and Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software" (both Microsoft Press); "Top Down Operator Precedence" by Douglas Crockford, architect at Yahoo!

Inc, Founder and CTO of State Software, where he discovered JSON; "Accelerating Population Count" by Henry Warren, currently works on the Blue Gene petaflop computer project Worked for IBM for 41 years; "Secure Communication: The Technology of Freedom" by Ashish Gulhati, Chief Developer of Neomailbox, an Internet privacy service Developer of Cryptonite, an OpenPGP-compatible secure webmail system; and, "Growing Beautiful Code in BioPerl" by Lincoln Stein, investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory - develops databases and user interfaces for the Human Genome Project using the Apache server and its module API.

It also includes: "The Design of the Gene Sorter" by Jim Kent, Genome Bioinformatics Group, University of California Santa Cruz; "How Elegant Code Evolves With Hardware: The Case Of Gaussian Elimination" by Jack Dongarra, University Distinguished Professor of Computer Science in the Computer Science Department at the University of Tennessee, also distinguished Research Staff member in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Piotr Luszczek, Research Professor at the University of Tennessee; "Beautiful Numerics" by Adam Kolawa, co-founder and CEO of Parasoft; and, "The Linux Kernel Driver Model" by Greg Kroah-Hartman, SuSE Labs/Novell, Linux kernel maintainer for driver subsystems, author of "Linux Kernel in a Nutshell", co-author of "Linux Device Drivers, 3rd Edition" (O'Reilly).

It also includes: "Another Level of Indirection" by Diomidis Spinellis, Associate Professor at the Department of Management Science and Technology at the Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece; "An Examination of Python's Dictionary Implementation" by Andrew Kuchling, longtime member of the Python development community, and a director of the Python Software Foundation; "Multi-Dimensional Iterators in NumPy" by Travis Oliphant, Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Brigham Young University; and, "A Highly Reliable Enterprise System for NASAs Mars Rover Mission" by Ronald Mak, co-founder and CTO of Willard & Lowe Systems, Inc, formerly a senior scientist at the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science on contract to NASA Ames.

It also includes: "ERP5: Designing for Maximum Adaptability" by Rogerio de Carvalho, researcher at the Federal Center for Technological Education of Campos (CEFET Campos), Brazil and Rafael Monnerat, IT Analyst at CEFET Campos, and an offshore consultant for Nexedi SARL; "A Spoonful of Sewage" by Bryan Cantrill, Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, where he has spent most of his career working on the Solaris kernel; "Distributed Programming with MapReduce" by Jeff Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat, Google Fellows in Google's Systems Infrastructure Group; "Beautiful Concurrency" by Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, key contributor to the design of the functional language Haskell, and lead designer of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC); and, "Syntactic Abstraction: The syntax-case expander" by Kent Dybvig, Developer of Chez Scheme and author of the Scheme Programming Language. It also includes: "Object-Oriented Patterns and a Framework for Networked Software" by William Otte, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at Vanderbilt University and Doug Schmidt, Full Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department, Associate Chair of the Computer Science and Engineering program, and a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Software Integrated Systems (ISIS) at Vanderbilt University; "Integrating Business Partners the RESTful Way" by Andrew Patzer, Director of the Bioinformatics Program at the Medical College of Wisconsin; and, "Beautiful Debugging" by Andreas Zeller, computer science professor at Saarland University, author of "Why Programs Fail: A Guide to Systematic Debugging" (Morgan Kaufman).

It also includes: "Code That's Like an Essay" by Yukihiro Matsumoto, inventor of the Ruby language; "Designing Interfaces Under Extreme Constraints: the Stephen Hawking editor" by Arun Mehta, professor and chairman of the Computer Engineering department of JMIT, Radaur, Haryana, India; "Emacspeak: The Complete Audio Desktop" by TV Raman, Research Scientist at Google where he focuses on web applications; "Code in Motion" by Christopher Seiwald, founder and CTO of Perforce Software and Laura Wingerd, vice president of product technology at Perforce Software, author of "Practical Perforce" (O'Reilly); and, "Writing Programs for 'The Book'" by Brian Hayes who writes the Computing Science column in American Scientist magazine, author of "Infrastructure: A Field Guide to the Industrial Landscape"(W.W. Norton).


Produktinformation


Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Leider nicht durchgängig gut 4. Januar 2008
Format:Taschenbuch
Da ich gerne mal ab und zu mal einen (meist viel zu kurzen) Blick über den Tellerrand meiner töglichen Arbeit in der C#/.NET-Welt werfe, versprach das Buch mit seiner Sammlung von verschiedenen Themen und Quelltextausschnitten in unterschiedlichen Programmiersprachen eigentlich recht interessant zu werden.

Einige Artikel haben auch das geboten, was ich mir erhofft hatte, nämlich eine interessante Lektüre, die man gemütlich auf dem Sofa lesen kann. Allerdings erfordern nicht wenige Stellen schon etwas Konzentration. Das ist natürlich nicht notwendigerweise schlecht, aber wenn dann bei manchen Autoren der Schreibstil eher zäh ist und man sich beim "Durcharbeiten" des Textes an seine Unizeit erinnert fühlt, blättert man als Berufstätiger im Feierabend vielleicht doch das eine oder andere Mal ungeduldig zum nächsten Kapitel.

Alles in allem ist "Beautiful Code" schon OK und etwas besser als es meine 3 vergebenen Sterne ausdrücken können - ein "4 Sterne"-Buch ist es für mich persönlich jedoch nicht.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
27 von 30 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Zwischen Genial und Langweilig... 16. Oktober 2007
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Wie das mit Sammelwerken verschiedener Autoren manchmal so ist: Das Spektrum der Qualitäten ist riesig: Manche Beiträge lesen sich spannend, andere sehr zähflüssig. Einige bestehen zum grossen Teil aus Codelistings (fand' ich weniger gut), andere erläutern wenige (gute!) Zeilen (fand ich grossartig).

Insgesamt aber positiv: über 30 Top-Autoren, vielseitige Themen, einige Perlen... Mit über 550 Seiten ist garantiert für jeden Quellcode-affinen Leser etwas passendes dabei. Von einigen Beiträgen (z.B. Alberto Savoia, Beautiful Tests) war ich begeistert, andere (z.B. Charles Petzold, On-The-Fly Code Generation for Image Processing) wirkten für mich wie Schlaftabletten.

Fazit: War meist nett zu lesen. Kein "Must-have", am besten ausleihen...
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr inspirierend und auch nützlich 22. Februar 2008
Format:Taschenbuch
Ich muss zugeben das das Buch eine schwäche darin hat das die Qualität der Autoren schwankend ist. Und manchmal Code Kolosse diskutiert werden die wenig ergiebig sind wenn man nicht aus dem Fachbereich kommt. Aber ich denke das die guten Beiträge bei weitem überwiegen. Und das was man dort lernt einfach wesentlich hilfreicher ist. Ich hätte nie gedacht das ich Binärsuchen auf einmal wieder toll finde oder mir auf einmal wieder Gedanken über Quicksort mache. An vielen Stellen dachte ich mir, Ja! Genauso hätte ich es auch gemacht. Nur um weniger später eine noch bessere Lösung zu sehen.
Man sollte nicht versuchen immer alles zu verstehen, sondern sich von den niedergelegten Gedankengängen inspireren lassen.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Viel geschrieben aber relativ wenig Code 13. November 2008
Format:Taschenbuch
Ich fand das Buch relativ entäuschend. Es wird über Schönheit geschrieben aber wenig "schöner Code" gezeigt und diskutiert. Dann gibt es in manchen Kapiteln so eine Art Einführung in Programmiersprachen. Wenn man daran interessiert wäre, dann kaufte man sich sicherlich ein Buch mit einem passenderen Titel. Wie z.B. Programming Ruby oder Programming Perl. Gut ist allerdings, daß auch "Non-Mainstream" Sprachen behandelt werden. Das belebt die Bücherwelt schon. Jedenfalls mehr als das 50ste Buch über C# Version 2.x.....
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
4.0 von 5 Sternen Nettes Buch, jedoch nicht mehr 25. Januar 2009
Von foobar
Format:Taschenbuch
Viele der Beiträge dieses Buchs sind sehr interessant und zeigen wie erfahrene Programmierer denken und arbeiten. Einige finde ich jedoch sehr langweilig und unaufschlussreich, was an den verwendeten Programmiersprachen und Themengebieten liegt.

Dennoch muss ich sagen stellt dieses Buch für mich eine Bereicherung da, auch wenn ich sicherlich nie mit beschriebenen Beispielen konfrontiert sein werde. Einige Artikel haben mich auch dazu gebracht über meine eigenen Methoden und Entwicklungsphilosophie kritisch zu reflektieren.

Als kleinen Nebeneffekt wird man im Verlauf des Buchs auch mit verschiedenen Programmiersprachen konfrontiert und deren Sprachparadigma kennenlernt. So hat dieses Buch mich dazu gebracht mich noch einmal mit Scheme zu beschäftigen.

So kann man sagen, dass das Buch einen guten Unterhaltungswert hat und einem andere Perspektiven auf Probleme vorstellt. Definitive Antworten oder Aussagen gibt es jedoch nicht, denn die muss man selbst herauslesen.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Format:Taschenbuch
The "Beautiful Code" book - collection of essays from well-known (and not well-known) software developers, about what is a "beautiful code". I can say, that book is good, but not more, as there are many essays about solving simple (from my point of view) problems. From all essays, that I've read, I can recommend following:
- "Beautiful concurrency" by Simon Peyton Jones - about implementation of parallel programs in Haskell
- "Syntactic abstraction: the syntax-case expander" by R. Kent Dybvig - how macros in Scheme work
- "Enacspeak: the complete audio desktop" by T.V. Raman
- "Top Down Operator Precedence" by Douglas Crockford
- "Growing Beautiful Code in BioPerl" by Lincoln Stein - "Another level of indirection"
- "Distributed programming with map/reducev by Jeffrey Dean & Sanjay Ghemawat
So if you'll get this book, you need at least look through it and select essays, that could be interested for you...
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Möchten Sie weitere Rezensionen zu diesem Artikel anzeigen?
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden