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Batman: Year One (Englisch) Taschenbuch – Special Edition, 10. Januar 2007


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Batman: Year One + Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (Batman Dark Knight) + Batman: The Killing Joke
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 144 Seiten
  • Verlag: DC Comics; Auflage: De Luxe edition (10. Januar 2007)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1401207529
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401207526
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 17 x 0,9 x 25,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (26 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 8.097 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

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Whether you grew up reading Batman comics, watched the campy television show, or eagerly await each new movie, this is the book for you. A retelling of the events that led to Bruce Wayne's becoming Batman, this book combines Frank Miller's tight film-noir writing with David Mazucchelli's solid artwork. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"If there is one book that deserves mention in the same breath as Watchmen or The Dark Knight Returns, it's Batman: Year One."—Miami Herald

"This is a story no true Batman fan should be able to resist."—School Library Journal

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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Amazon Customer am 17. Dezember 2005
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Since Frank Miller wrote and illustrated the ultimate final Batman story in "The Dark Knight Returns," great attention was paid when he penned a new version of the first Batman story with "Batman: Year One," leaving the artistic duties to David Mazzucchelli (with Richmond Lewis painting the colors). Miller came up with several great moments in "The Dark Knight Returns," most notably when the Joker snaps his own neck, but the part that stood out for me was when Batman explains to Superman the different lessons they learned from the example of their respective parents. Stephen King once said you were either a Batman person or a Superman person, and Miller came up with a nice way of capturing their inherently oppositional natures. The four issues of "Batman" (#404-407) that made up this mini-series are not part of the constant debate as to the greatest graphic novel of all time (still "Watchmen" for me), but all things considered I think "Batman: Year One" is the better story.
If "The Dark Knight Returns" comes down to Batman versus Superman and the world's finest realizing they must be on opposite sides, then "Batman: Year One" from start to finish is about Batman and Jim Gordon coming to the realization that they need each other. Miller and Mazzucchelli develop stories that are not really parallel, but which are heading to the same end point. Gordon arrives in Gotham City for the first time by train while Bruce Wayne flies back home after twelve years abroad, each thinking they should have picked the other mode of transportation.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ramon Varela am 20. Januar 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
It is a shame that, Tim Burton's excellent two outings notwithstanding, the Batman of film and television is the one that is most solidly rooted in the collective psyche of the public. What many current readers may not remember, however, is that the campiness of the 1966-68 TV show was reflected in, and fed off the Batman titles at the time.
All of that changed when Dennis O'Neil took over the writing chores and returned the character to the dark roots laid out by the late, great, Bob Kane and Bill Finger. Dennis O'Neil brought Batman comics into and through puberty. Frank Miller brought them into adulthood.
Along with the brilliant "Dark Knight Returns," "Year One" bookends the saga of Bruce Wayne by re-interpreting and sometimes redefining the character's roots. In so doing, Frank Miller laid the foundation for the character that today populates the monthly titles. Although not as grim as "Dark Knight," "Year One" nonetheless hits closer to home and is, in my opinion, the best introduction to the character for anyone unfamiliar with it outside of film and TV.
The parallel struggles of Bruce Wayne and Jim Gordon to "clean up a city that likes being dirty" are brilliantly rendered by Miller, possibly the finest comics writer EVER. Miller's Jim Gordon is a far cry from the incompetent beat cop shown in movies and TV. He is a passionate, crusading man, the sort of cop Bruce Wayne might have been in another reality.
Opinions have always been strong one way or the other about the art in "Year One." For my money, you couldn't ask for more.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Jeffrey A. Veyera am 6. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Following up on his 1986 renovation of the Batman myth with "The Dark Knight Returns", Frank Miller teamed with David Mazzucchelli to produce "Batman: Year One", a novel retelling of how Bruce Wayne came to don tights to fight crime.
Miller's Gotham City is a corrupt and festering cesspool, much as he would later depict in his Sin City series. Two good men come to town to clean things up: Bruce Wayne and Jim Gordon, a new detective on the Gotham police force fresh from his role in cleaning up another police department.
Wayne himself has returned to his hometown after a long absence, during which he trained himself to become a vigilante. Wayne's first foray into crimefighting nearly ends in disaster, but leads him ultimately to adopt the Batman motif to frighten criminals. Gordon becomes his unlikely ally as he strives to clean up Gotham's police department.
The writing remains more mature and gritty than the typical comic book fare of the time. Batman is not the invincible denizen of the dark we've come to know and love, but an awkward guy in a goofy costume who seems always to be within an inch of death. Gordon is no paragon of virtue either; the main subplot deals with his affair with another cop while his wife waits to give birth to his son.
The result is a gripping, gritty, and ultimately redeeming tale which once again reinvents the familiar figure of the Batman.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Stephen Richmond am 30. Dezember 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
I have never been much of a Batman fan since the TV show went off back in the late sixties; however, this collection from the late eighties shows a lot of the promise the character has always contained, but seldom realized. Frank Miller is certainly one of the finest writers to emerge from comics in the last generation of so, and this is a fine example of his work. His conception of Batman and the entire body of Bat-lore is unique, while remaining respectful, if not cloyingly faithful, to the years of prior continuity. This story within is of parallel obsessions: Bruce Wayne's passionate promise on his parents' grave to rid his city of the criminal element and James Gordon's equally ardent impulse to do much the same, only through traditional law enforcement means. The portrayal of Selina Kyle as the incipient Catwoman is particularly poignant and gripping as is the long-suffering portrait of Barbara Gordon, the quintessential cop's wife. While the art is interesting in a primitive, naive mode, David Mazzuchelli and Richmond Lewis seem an unfortunate choice of artists for the work that relaunched the entire Batman franchise. Perhaps, however, it is a testament to the strength of Miller's writing, that the art neither detracts nor distracts from the story.
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