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Atlas of Remote Islands [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Judith Schalansky , Christine Lo
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Gebundene Ausgabe, 5. Oktober 2010 EUR 18,95  
Taschenbuch --  

Kurzbeschreibung

5. Oktober 2010
A rare and beautifully illustrated journey to fifty faraway worlds.

There are still places on earth that are unknown. Visually stunning and uniquely designed, this wondrous book captures fifty islands that are far away in every sense-from the mainland, from people, from airports, and from holiday brochures. Author Judith Schalansky used historic events and scientific reports as a springboard for each island, providing information on its distance from the mainland, whether its inhabited, its features, and the stories that have shaped its lore. With stunning full-color maps and an air of mysterious adventure, Atlas of Remote Island is perfect for the traveler or romantic in all of us.


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Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Atlas of Remote Islands + Taschenatlas der abgelegenen Inseln: Fünfzig Inseln, auf denen ich nie war und niemals sein werde
Preis für beide: EUR 33,94

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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 144 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin Books (5. Oktober 2010)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 014311820X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143118206
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 26 x 19,1 x 1,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 2.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 80.517 in Englische Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Englische Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Judith Schalansky, geboren 1980 in Greifswald, studierte Kunstgeschichte und Kommunikationsdesign, unterrichtete Typografische Grundlagen an der Fachhochschule Potsdam und lebt heute als freie Schriftstellerin und Buchgestalterin in Berlin und Frankfurt am Main. 2006 veröffentlichte sie ihr typografisches Kompendium »Fraktur mon Amour« (Verlag Hermann Schmidt Mainz). 2008 erschien ihr literarisches Debüt, der Matrosenroman »Blau steht dir nicht« (mare). Für ihren »Atlas der abgelegenen Inseln« (mare, 2009) wurde sie mit dem 1. Preis der Stiftung Buchkunst ausgezeichnet. Im September 2011 erschien ihr Bildungsroman »Der Hals der Giraffe« im Suhrkamp Verlag.

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"(a) cartographical gem"
-The Wall Street Journal - Great New (Armchair) Travel Reads

"An utterly exquisite object: atlas as Wunderkammer and bestiary, bound in black cloth and sea-blue card...makes a magnificent case for the atlas to be recognised as literature, worthy of its original name - theatrum orbis terrarum, "the theatre of the world".
-Robert Macfarlane, The Guardian (UK)

"This beautifully illustrated atlas reveals that cartography and the creative imagination have always intersected, spurred on by human wanderlust."
-NPR's 2010 Favorites pick

"'Paradise is an island. So is hell.' Or so says Judith Schalansky in the introduction to her charming, spooky and splendid Atlas of Remote Islands."
-The New Yorker's Book Bench

"...absolutely magical."
-Conde Nast Traveler- CNTraveler.com

"The first five times (or so) that I paged through the Atlas of Remote Islands: Fifty Islands I Have Never Set Foot On and Never Will, I fell deeply in love with the book... Each of author and artist Judith Schalansky's maps--hand-drawn in shades of gray, black, white, and brilliant orange on cadet blue paper--transported me to a, usually, remote island..."
-NationalGeographic.com

"... A testament to the transformative power of maps. Atlas of Remote Islands is a celebration of what can still be accomplished with imagination, paper and ink. Holding it, you feel as if you've stolen the composition book that dreamy girl in the back row of our high school English class is always scribbling into. You page through it and think, Oh, my God. She's a genius."
-Anthony Doerr, TheMillions.com

"That impossible-to-please friend, that cranky relative, that coffee table begging for something more interesting that last Sunday's New York Times Magazine- worry about them no more. Here is your holiday gift, your birthday present, your living room's conversation-igniter."
-HeadButler.com

"The most beautiful and powerful book I have ever seen like this is the Pennyroyal Caxton (King James) Bible, with haunting engravings by the genius Barry Moser. The second most beautiful and amazing book like this I have ever seen arrived, slim and stunning, on my desk days ago: Atlas of Remote Islands. For a child itching to see the world, for the child inside an aged and creaky vessel, for all of us who never stopped dreaming of faraway islands draped in amazing languages and wild stories and a wholly new angle of light, this is the perfect gift."
-Brian Doyle, The Oregonian

"... hand-drawn maps of the remote islands and the fascinating stories that go alongside are utterly captivating..."
-The South Mississippi Sun Herald

"... one of those books that you can easily spend a day dreamily paging through. Beautiful stories are crafted from these remote islands histories, giving character to the pieces of land that could be easily overlooked or forgotten. You want this book."
-World's Best Ever blog www.theworldsbestever.com

"Is it possible to confuse a romance novel for an atlas?... I opened the pages to maps that looked as though they were painted in the Middle Ages. They are clear, artistic, and true to scale. I approached the text and continued my love affair."
-GoNomad.com

"Judith Schalansky's pseudo-tome- the product of a lifetime of studying maps, typography, art and design- is a charming romp through 50 of the most remote islands in the world. But this book is about so much more than maps... it's beautiful...it's charming, fanciful and is part of a near-perfect construction of a book that captures the romance of travel... This is a great coffee table book, perfect for history buffs, dreamers of anyone who sticks pins in their maps and obsessively uses "GTrot" on Facebook."
-LostGirlsWorld.com

"Gorgeously illustrated and with color maps throughout... Judith Schalansky lures us onto fifty remote islands... and proves that the most adventurous journeys still take place in the mind, with one finger pointing at a map."
-Publishing Perspectives

"When we dream of escaping from frantic modern lives into another more perfect kind of existence, the image of an island often comes to mind, a refuge where time slows down, the living is easy and we can at last find inner peace. It's a fantasy, practically a Jungian archetype now... Schalansky's book won a prize in Germany as the most beautiful book of the year. It deserves to win several more. Atlas of Remote Islands is a stunningly accomplished piece of work, as well as being a rare feat of total authorship."
-Rick Poyner at the Observer's Room blog

"The first five times (or so) that I paged through the Atlas of Remote Islands, I fell deeply in love with the book. Each of author and artist Judith Schalansky's maps transported me."
-Intelligent Travel blog

"Last night I devoured the most beautiful book... It's wonderful: it's like Borges' eccentric encyclopedias. It is, in a word, great."
-Caustic Cover Critic blog

"Judith Schalansky's Atlas of Remote Islands perfectly merges the experiences of reading Calvino's Invisible Cities and pouring over an atlas as age eight. I really can't imagine recommending a book more highly."
-Harry Schwartz Eats The World blog

"...what has to be the coolest book released all year. Totally amazing."
-Survival of the Book blog

"Atlas of Remote Islands is a book that opens like a trunk of dusty letters in an attic- full of the promise of the unknown, and the discovery of small delights. There is poetry in the book's simplicity, and a reminder of the beauty of print."
-emagazine.com

"If you ever wonder what kind of place 'real' books will have in an increasingly electronic world, the Atlas of Remote Islands is the perfect example of the power wielded by a physical artifact. This book is a rare gem. It's like your favourite children's fantasy book come to life... it's a little like Lost, and it is like traveling to the moon."
-Writer's Pet blog

"It's a delight... a weird and wonderful assortment."
-Lonely Planet blog

"With hand drawn detailed topographic maps and intricate local histories, each of the islands comes alive through stories about marooned slaves, lonely scientists, lost explorers, mutinous sailors, confused lighthouse keepers, and forgotten castaways."
-Perceptive Travel blog

"An armchair traveler's delight."
-The Philadelphia Inquirer

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Judith Schalansky was born in 1980 in Greifswald, Germany. She has degrees in both History of Art and Communication Design. Judith currently works as a freelance writer and designer in Berlin and has been teaching courses in the principles of typography at the Potsdam Technical Institute since 2008.

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
Habe diesmal die englische Ausgabe als Geschenk für englischsprachige Freunde gewählt und bin leider enttäuscht, da diese Ausgabe von Penguin grafisch ( Druckqualität und Papier ) nicht an die hervorragende deutsche Ausgabe des Mare Verlags rankommt . Da er Charme des - vom mir aus diesem Grund schon vielfach verschenkten Buches- genau in diesem Detail liegt
also leider nicht empfehlenswert in der Penguin-Ausgabe.
Der deutlich günstigere Preis dieser Ausgabe ( 18,95€ Penguin, 34,- € Mare ) hätte mich stutzig machen sollen.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Far from the madding crowd, you find the best gift book in years... 5. Oktober 2010
Von Jesse Kornbluth - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
That impossible-to-please friend, that cranky relative, that coffee table begging for something more interesting than last Sunday's New York Times Magazine --- worry about them no more.

Here is your holiday gift, your birthday present, your living room's conversation-igniter.

And no worries that "Atlas of Remote Islands (Fifty Islands I Have Never Set Foot on and Never Will)" will be showing up on legions of gift lists. [To buy "Atlas of Remote Islands" from Amazon, click here.] Though published by Penguin, the biggest recognition the book has received to date is the German Book Office's October Book of the Month. The author, Judith Schalansky, is a German designer and novelist whose last book was "Fraktur Mon Amour, a study of the Nazis' favorite typeface.

Schalansky got interested in maps and atlases for the most personal of reasons. She was born in East Berlin; when she was 10, East and West Germany merged, "and the country I was born in disappeared from the map." With that, she lost interest in political maps and became fascinated with the basic building blocks of Earth's land masses : physical topography.

Fascinating stuff.

You doubt me?

Consider: Schalansky sees a finger traveling across a map as "an erotic gesture."

Consider: Schalansky disdains any island you can easily get to. The more remote the destination, the more enthusiastic she is for it. Like Peter I Island in the Antarctic --- until the late 1990s, fewer people had visited it than had set foot on the moon.

Consider: Schalansky believes "the most terrible events have the greatest potential to tell a story" --- and "islands make the perfect setting for them." Thus, the line at the start of the book: "Paradise is an island. So is hell."

The result? Fifty islands. The world's loneliest places, in lovely two-page spreads, with geographical information and curious histories on the left, and, on the right, a map of the hapless land mass set on a deceptively peaceful blue background.

Start in the Far North, at Lonely Island, where the average annual temperature is -16 degrees. In the Indian Ocean, on Diego Garcia, is a secretive British military base with a golf course where 500 families once lived. A hundred twenty million crabs begin life on Christmas Island; millions of penguins inhabit Macquarie Island. France tested its hydrogen bomb on Fangataufa, after which no one was allowed to set foot on it for six years. On Pukapuka, there is no word for "virgin." The Banabas hang their dead from their huts until the flesh disappears; they store the bones under their houses.

And, to give you a sense of Schalansky's lovely, ironic style as a writer:

St. Kilda, United Kingdom
There are sixteen cottages, three houses and one church in the only village on St. Kilda. The island's future is written in its graveyard. Its children are all born in good health, but most stop feeding during their fourth, fifth or sixth night. On the seventh day, their palates tighten and their throats constrict, so it becomes impossible to get them to swallow anything. Their muscles twitch and their jaws hang loose. Their eyes grow staring and they yawn a great deal; their mouth stretch in mocking grimaces. Between the seventh and ninth day, two-thirds of the newborn babies die, boys outnumbering girls. Some die sooner, some later: one dies on the fourth day, another not till the twenty-first.

Amsterdam Island, France
Everyone who stays on Amsterdam for longer than a year is examined by a medical officer from the south of France to check that he is coping with the long period of restriction of movement and the confined, purely masculine environment. No woman has visited longer than two days. At night, the men gather in the small video room in Great Skua to watch one of the porn films from their personal collection. Each man sits in a row on his own. The loudspeakers emit grunts and groans, and the air is heavy with the musky scent of the bull seals.

Are these stories true? The author is cagey:

That's why the question whether these stories are `true' is misleading. Every detail stems from factual sources...however I was the discoverer of the sources, researching them through ancient and rare books, and I have transformed the texts and appropriated them as sailors appropriate the lands they discover.

Transformed? Well, why not --- it's not like you're booking a ticket to visit any of these places. Just the opposite. Reading in your favorite chair, sipping a cuppa, you can conclude there's no place like home.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen a physical book that takes you away 27. Oktober 2010
Von James Howard - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
As a book lover you can become forlorn with the constant barrage of why physical books and the brick-and-mortar bookstore are obsolete in these days of digital book hype and the pursuit of immediate gratification in quick, small portions.

"Atlas of Remote Islands" is the refutation of those perceived realities.

I serendipitously came across this book as I was meandering through a bookstore...was arrested by the book displayed (tall, thin) and the sub title ("Fifty Island I Have Never Set Foot On and Never Will"). Okay, okay, I'm posting this review on Amazon... but the book is so good that if your local bookstore doesn't have it, then buy it wherever you can!

Not only is the concept for the book just so cool.... it is also beautifully presented, each entry wonderfully laid out and completely engrossing. This is a book you curl up with in your favorite chair on a dark winter night with a hot cup of something in arms reach.

This book is exactly why the book - the physically opening the cover and turning the pages book - will never become obsolete.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Why Kindles can't do everything. 27. Dezember 2010
Von Christopher R. Schaffner - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a book you have to hold in your hand, page through, and imagine about. Then you put it on the shelf. Then you take it down and look at it again. Repeat.

Really, it's very beautiful, very inspiring, very mysterious.
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Some interesting stories, some are just big pieces of rock 30. Mai 2011
Von Efrem Sepulveda - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Ms. Schalansky's book on remote islands is pleasing work on lands that are located in remote places of the earth and some that, while located close to more populated islands, have some interesting stories behind them. The book consists of a short essay summarizing the book and descriptions of the islands broken down by location (Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, etc.), a glossary of terms and a short index.

The stories that interested me the most were the histories of Diego Garcia (the natives being removed for the purpose of constructing a military base), Pingelap (where inbreeding of the natives led to a high incidence of color blindness), Tikopia (where infanticide was (is?) condoned to control population growth and preserve scarce resources and Takuu (missionaries and researchers are not allowed on the island). Atlasova Island's story interested me as well for its description of a perfectly symmetrical volcano rising up out the sea just off Russia's Kamchatka peninsula.

Some of the stories however were just descriptions of barren rocks such as those in the Arctic Ocean and the islands close to Antarctica which left me to want to learn more history about these places. I think the book could have included a bibliography which could have directed the reader to more in depth coverage that would given some flavor to some of the interesting stories found in this book. A nice work that should find itself in a cartographer's book collection.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen I read it before I bought it 3. Juli 2012
Von Simon N. Schuster - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I read this slim volume while browsing in the bookstore, then decided it was only fair to buy it. The cartography is a little disappointing - very little here but the shape of the islands - and I found myself going to other maps and Google Earth for a better look. The brief blurbs about the islands follow no set pattern: some cover geography, others are based on history, pop culture, philosophy... Many were fascinating. The short biographical piece was interesting as well, like a greatly expanded "About the Author." In the end, I was wishing it had been 100 remote islands, not 50, so I'd have to say I really enjoyed the book.
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