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Ardor Kindle Edition


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Kindle Edition
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Kindle Edition, 18. November 2014
EUR 15,99

Länge: 433 Seiten Sprache: Englisch

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Praise for "La Folie Baudelaire"

"Roberto Calasso [is] the most inquisitively suggestive literary critic in the world today." --Thomas McGonigle, "Los Angeles Times""

""["La Folie Baudelaire"] is as red-blooded as art criticism gets, and a suitable encomium for the greatest of art critics." --Jad Adams, "The Daily Telegraph"

"[A] careful, thoughtful, and detailed exploration . . . Richard Dixon's supple and elegant translation brings Calasso's poetic meditations to life. Readers will return again and again for wisdom and insight." --"Publisher's Weekly""Illuminating . . . The author pursues his own quest for enlightenment by questioning, treading carefully and humbling himself before a body of knowledge that has not always been well-served by his Western predecessors. . . . 'The whole of Vedic India was an attempt to think further, ' writes Calasso. He demands no less from his readers." --"Kirkus Reviews""Calasso is not only immensely learned; he is one of the most original thinkers and writers we have today." --Charles Simic"Roberto Calasso [is] the most inquisitively suggestive literary critic in the world today." --Thomas McGonigle, "Los Angeles Times""Roberto Calasso [is] a writer about the foundational myths and tales of human society who has no equal in the sparkle of his storytelling and the depth of his learning." --Boyd Tonkin, "The Independent""[Calasso] has certainly managed to open a new road through the old landscape of literature." --John Banville, "The New York Review of Books""Roberto Calasso [is] an exceptionally accessible thinker, original and profound." --Muriel Spark, "The Times Literary Supplement"

""Ardor" is Calasso's mode in his serpentine, allusive, and expansive readings . . . provocative . . . Calasso's profuse, high-wire exegesis brings the intricacies and marvels of Vedic thought vividly and evocatively to life." "--"Donna Seaman, "Booklist""""[A] careful, thoughtful, and detailed exploration . . . Richard Dixon's supple and elegant translation brings Calasso's poetic meditations to life. Readers will return again and again for wisdom and insight." --"Publisher's Weekly""Illuminating . . . The author pursues his own quest for enlightenment by questioning, treading carefully and humbling himself before a body of knowledge that has not always been well-served by his Western predecessors. . . . 'The whole of Vedic India was an attempt to think further, ' writes Calasso. He demands no less from his readers." --"Kirkus Reviews""Calasso is not only immensely learned; he is one of the most original thinkers and writers we have today." --Charles Simic"Roberto Calasso [is] the most inquisitively suggestive literary critic in the world today." --Thomas McGonigle, "Los Angeles Times""Roberto Calasso [is] a writer about the foundational myths and tales of human society who has no equal in the sparkle of his storytelling and the depth of his learning." --Boyd Tonkin, "The Independent""[Calasso] has certainly managed to open a new road through the old landscape of literature." --John Banville, "The New York Review of Books""Roberto Calasso [is] an exceptionally accessible thinker, original and profound." --Muriel Spark, "The Times Literary Supplement"

"Calasso's prose is scrupulously lucid and elegant." "--"Pankaj Mishra, "The New York Times Book Review"""Ardor" is Calasso's mode in his serpentine, allusive, and expansive readings . . . provocative . . . Calasso's profuse, high-wire exegesis brings the intricacies and marvels of Vedic thought vividly and evocatively to life." "--"Donna Seaman, "Booklist""""[A] careful, thoughtful, and detailed exploration . . . Richard Dixon's supple and elegant translation brings Calasso's poetic meditations to life. Readers will return again and again for wisdom and insight." --"Publisher's Weekly""Illuminating . . . The author pursues his own quest for enlightenment by questioning, treading carefully and humbling himself before a body of knowledge that has not always been well-served by his Western predecessors. . . . 'The whole of Vedic India was an attempt to think further, ' writes Calasso. He demands no less from his readers." --"Kirkus Reviews""Calasso is not only immensely learned; he is one of the most original thinkers and writers we have today." --Charles Simic"Roberto Calasso [is] the most inquisitively suggestive literary critic in the world today." --Thomas McGonigle, "Los Angeles Times""Roberto Calasso [is] a writer about the foundational myths and tales of human society who has no equal in the sparkle of his storytelling and the depth of his learning." --Boyd Tonkin, "The Independent""[Calasso] has certainly managed to open a new road through the old landscape of literature." --John Banville, "The New York Review of Books""Roberto Calasso [is] an exceptionally accessible thinker, original and profound." --Muriel Spark, "The Times Literary Supplement"

Kurzbeschreibung

In a meditation on the wisdom of the Vedas, Roberto Calasso brings ritual and sacrifice to bear on the modern world

In this revelatory volume, Roberto Calasso, whom The Paris Review has called "a literary institution," explores the ancient texts known as the Vedas. Little is known about the Vedic people, who lived more than three thousand years ago in northern India: They left behind almost no objects, images, or ruins. They created no empires. Even the soma, the likely hallucinogenic plant that appears at the center of some of their rituals, has not been identified with any certainty. Only a "Parthenon of words" remains: verses and formulations suggesting a daring understanding of life.
"If the Vedic people had been asked why they did not build cities," writes Calasso, "they could have replied: we did not seek power, but rapture." This is the ardor of the Vedic world, a burning intensity that is always present, both in the mind and in the cosmos.
With his signature erudition and profound sense of the past, Calasso explores the enigmatic web of ritual and myth that defines the Vedas. Often at odds with modern thought, these texts illuminate the nature of consciousness more vividly than anything else has managed to till now. Following the "hundred paths" of the Satapatha Brahmana, an impressive exegesis of Vedic ritual, Ardor indicates that it may be possible to reach what is closest by passing through that which is most remote, as "the whole of Vedic India was an attempt to think further."


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 6406 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 433 Seiten
  • Verlag: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (18. November 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00IHC7VB4
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: Schreiben Sie die erste Bewertung
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #678.010 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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51 von 52 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x90bd58c4) von 5 Sternen Calasso's Masterpiece -- An Intoxicating and Perfect Book 23. Dezember 2014
Von Ulrich - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
"The ṛṣis reached an unattainable level of knowledge not just because they thought certain thoughts but because they burned. Ardor comes before thought."

Wendy Doniger famously hailed Calasso's previous book "Ka" as "[t]he very best book about Hindu mythology that anyone has ever written." After engaging the subject for another fifteen years of intense contemplation, Calasso has returned to it. And the resulting "Ardor," I'm delighted to report after weeks of carefully reading the new English translation, is significantly superior to Ka. I won't limit my praise to books on Hindu mythology; this is the best book I've read this year, and one of the best books on religion you're ever likely to read.

Calasso tells us he originally began writing Ardor as an intended commentary on perhaps the least loved, and least accessible, corpus of ancient Indian religious texts: The Brahmanas, specifically the Satapatha Brahmana. The earliest Vedas, the Rg Veda hymns, can generally be appreciated through the broader lens of religious hymns, while the later Upanishads (which the Brahmanas ultimately segue into) can be appreciated through the lens of philosophy. But the intermediary Brahmanas represent a thorny challenge. What to do with this vast corpus of awesomely complex ancient liturgical analysis and theorizing? How to engage this immense body of thought regarding a vanished practice of complex sacrificial ritual? Many scholars have just condemned the Brahmanas as priestly nonsense, and most people interested in Indian religion skip over the Vedic sacrificial texts into the more congenial later periods of Hindu religion and philosophy, starting with the Upanishads and then the medieval texts. Krishna, Vedanta, ahimsa, all of this is widely preferred to the Vedic sacrificial post, the altar, the animal, the mass of equivalences.

Not Calasso. Rather than dancing about the edges, this is a book about Vedic thought and Vedic sacrificial ritual, focusing on the Brahmanas as composed between the 10th and 6th centuries B.C.E. Calasso's discussions are admirably informed by his engagement with Indological scholars, and he blithely informs us that the Sanskrit translations are his own 'unless otherwise indicated.' The book's overall tone is anthropological in the broad sense, rather than the more literary Ka, and not narrowly philosophical. Many readers might lament the corresponding rarity of stories, compared to Ka. But how could it be otherwise? Sacrificial ritual is not just a story like any other, nor can sacrificial thought (per Calasso) be reduced to a simple positivist description of social behavior. Ardor consists largely of essay after essay which engage different aspects of what, exactly, ritual sacrifice is and what it means, much like the Brahmanas themselves.

The essays are dizzying, incendiary. Each provokes thoughts for days. Each ranges across an amazing variety of subjects. Rarely does Calasso lose his footing or focus. With his background as the head of a prestigious Italian publishing firm, Calasso's prior works are known for tracing connections between 'absolute' modern literature and ancient religious thought. Ardor is full of such observations, and for the most part they are incisive, particularly in the context of the Vedic preoccupation with bandhu, equivalences. For Calasso, bandhu are another form of the equivalences now found in another world of thought which likewise resists reduction, and which over time has been torn from its social ritual context and internalized in the solitary sacrificer/sacrifice: The modern artist. Much of Ardor consists of engaging these types of equivalences and thinking about them deeply. Calasso calls this 'connective thinking,' and contrasts it with 'substitutive thinking.'

This analogical mode of thought, connective thinking, is extremely difficult. In the hands of somebody who is less than an absolute master, it readily degenerates into gibberish or pop song banalities (e.g. "love is ... sacrifice. love is ... forgiveness. love is ... you."). Though Calasso does not say so, a book like Ardor itself is (in keeping with Calasso's view of modern art) analogous to the Vedic sacrifice ... carefully crafted to travel an infinitely difficult path by which human thought mediates the visible and invisible worlds, steeped in guilt and danger, with every step requiring intense concentration and perfect execution. Every essay in Ardor is perfectly calibrated in that manner, and manifests what Calasso terms the 'sacrificial attitude.' The prose is simpler, more direct than Calasso's typical work, as required for the subject's difficulty. Even the artwork is perfectly selected.

It all works beautifully from start to finish. With Ardor, Calasso has helped extricate Vedic thought from its current protective shield of New Age silliness, Hindutva dogma, accusations of Orientalism, feeble 'spirituality,' etc. Ardor's first chapter, entitled "Remote Beings," begins by discussing how remote the Vedic world is from our modern life. Vedic thought is nobody's property -- not that of academics, gurus, Hindutva, politicians. And it's not a lesson on tame 'spirituality' for modern life. But like other ancient human worlds, that immense distance does not mean it is lost or insignificant. It is a total world of vast significance, one that Calasso recovers and brings to life. Ardor is, as the title suggests, an absolute fire within the mind, and by extension the world; precision and soul, to use Musil's phrase (cited by Calasso in this book, but you'll have to read for yourself to find out how).

Although Ardor is less accessible than Ka (less stories, more ritual discussion, more anthropological thought), I can't imagine anybody who enjoys reading, and thought generally, who wouldn't love this book. One of the most fascinating men alive, engaging one of the most fascinating possible subjects, with total intensity. The book is sheer joy, and with any justice will rank as a classic. This isn't a moderate review, but it isn't a moderate book, nor a moderate subject. The point is to intoxicate; Soma is the sacrifice. Books like this are why I read.

Finally, The Paris Review has recently published online a superb interview with Calasso himself -- please go read it! It will give you some background and insight if you are new to Calasso and his work.
24 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x90bd5918) von 5 Sternen A monument to those that built theirs in the mind 6. Dezember 2014
Von Kripa Rajshekhar - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
A great lover of texts has given us a gift. If you play along with this genius, you might detect surprisingly recognizable harmonics. Invisible and unconventional but reflections, without distortion, without a doubt. A deeper appreciation of what he found when he wrote "Ka".

If ever a book made me wish I was a better reader, this would be the one. One is humbled by his range, the ability to connect, the flashes of media - in papyrus here, in mantra there, a university researcher's key-board now, soot covered paper in some other corner.

Borges RE: Kafka “His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.” What Borges noted about Kafka is patently the case with Calasso.

“the other one, the one called Borges” - J.L.Borges

Calasso shows in this book that others, many years before Borges, had the same realization - and then went beyond. Connecting precise action with unimaginable intent to access the invisible within and everywhere.

Rereading sections and chapters continue to reward with new glimpses and flashes of brilliance. I would recommend patience and many departures and returns to visit different parts of this tome and realize the pleasures in the book.
9 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x90bd5bf4) von 5 Sternen ... "The marriage of Cadmus and Harmony" which were both brilliant works on Indian and Greek mythology 12. Januar 2015
Von Avinesh - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I have read Calasso's "Ka" and "The marriage of Cadmus and Harmony" which were both brilliant works on Indian and Greek mythology. The style of narration was one of the best I have read with a very clear and precise understanding of these cultures and their stories.

Ardor is a bit different. It is a more academic work and often will seem very dry. There are historical contexts to different modern western translations. Roberto Calasso comments on the historical prospective, the language difficulties and the cultural connotations (Aryan-Indian) with occasional comparisons to ancient Greeks and modern German philosophers (Kant and Schopenhauer).

Ardor is a work of Metaphysics from the mouths of the ancients. It is a telling of the Rig Veda and Upanishads. The insights that Roberto brings are unique and is definitely worth the time and effort. This book is for someone intimately interested in Indian Vedantic Philosophy or Hindu culture and Traditions. This book should be complemented with other Indian works on Vedas/Upanishads or works of Indian Philosophy e.g. by Radhakrishnan.
2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x90bd5aec) von 5 Sternen A Game Changer 29. März 2015
Von hh - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Calasso, in a certain way, is a massive, hyper-intelligent, talking library. The extent of his erudition is difficult to overstate. But what's really impressive is the ability he has to make (extremely novel, highly insightful) connections from among his enormous repository of knowledge.

Adding to this, the quality of the writing is difficult to describe. No wasted words, but a host of really powerful ones. The translator, Dixon, deserves a lot of credit. l can scarcely imagine how beautiful this book must be in its native Italian.

If you are interested in the Vedas, I cannot recommend this book highly enough. Equally so, however, if you are simply open to having your mind expanded, somewhat ironically without chemicals (given the emphasis on soma in the culture and texts on which Calasso is commenting).

This was one of the first books I have ever read.
HASH(0x90bd5cfc) von 5 Sternen Those birds represent the mind, Vedic psychology. One looks out and the other looks back in. 28. August 2015
Von John David Craycraft - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I'm enjoying it. I'm 3/4 the way through. Uhhhh I don't reviews but this is one. Do you enjoy learning about religion, spirituality? Do you enjoy both practical application and dry scholarly words? Apparently the Vedic tradition predates all other spiritual practices. The author has a way of transporting the reader back to that obscure time. He notes how we have no artifacts other than their words in the Vedas and Upanishads etc. It's supremely interesting. I plan on getting his older book "KA" soon. If you pick it up, given that you're the type of person that would pick it up, I'm sure you'll enjoy it.
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