Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 47,23
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Antifragile: Things That ... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,10 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder (Incerto) (Englisch) Audio-CD – Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe


Alle 9 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Audio-CD, Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 47,23
EUR 47,23 EUR 58,20
2 neu ab EUR 47,23 2 gebraucht ab EUR 58,20
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Audio CD: 13 Seiten
  • Verlag: Random House Audio; Auflage: Unabridged (27. November 2012)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0739370693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739370698
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13 x 4,1 x 15 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (24 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 243.705 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Ambitious and thought-provoking . . . highly entertaining.”The Economist
 
“A bold book explaining how and why we should embrace uncertainty, randomness, and error . . . It may just change our lives.”Newsweek
 
“Revelatory . . . [Taleb] pulls the reader along with the logic of a Socrates.”Chicago Tribune
 
“Startling . . . richly crammed with insights, stories, fine phrases and intriguing asides . . . I will have to read it again. And again.”—Matt Ridley, The Wall Street Journal
 
“Trenchant and persuasive . . . Taleb’s insatiable polymathic curiosity knows no bounds. . . . You finish the book feeling braver and uplifted.”New Statesman
 
“Antifragility isn’t just sound economic and political doctrine. It’s also the key to a good life.”Fortune
 
“At once thought-provoking and brilliant.”—Los Angeles Times

“[Taleb] writes as if he were the illegitimate spawn of David Hume and Rev. Bayes, with some DNA mixed in from Norbert Weiner and Laurence Sterne. . . . Taleb is writing original stuff—not only within the management space but for readers of any literature—and . . . you will learn more about more things from this book and be challenged in more ways than by any other book you have read this year. Trust me on this.”Harvard Business Review

“By far my favorite book among several good ones published in 2012. In addition to being an enjoyable and interesting read, Taleb’s new book advances general understanding of how different systems operate, the great variation in how they respond to unthinkables, and how to make them more adaptable and agile. His systemic insights extend very well to company-specific operational issues—from ensuring that mistakes provide a learning process to the importance of ensuring sufficient transparency to the myriad of specific risk issues.”—Mohamed El-Erian, CEO of PIMCO, Bloomberg


From the Hardcover edition.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Nassim Nicholas Taleb has devoted his life to problems of uncertainty, probability, and knowledge. He spent nearly two decades as a businessman and quantitative trader before becoming a full-time philosophical essayist and academic researcher in 2006. Although he spends most of his time in the intense seclusion of his study, or as a flâneur meditating in cafés, he is currently Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University’s Polytechnic Institute. His main subject matter is “decision making under opacity”—that is, a map and a protocol on how we should live in a world we don’t understand.
 
Taleb’s books have been published in thirty-three languages.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Nach einer anderen Ausgabe dieses Buches suchen.
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.1 von 5 Sternen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von A. D. Thibeault am 9. Dezember 2012
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
*A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Monday, December 17, 2012.

The concept of fragility is very familiar to us. It applies to things that break when you strike or stretch them with a relatively small amount of force. Porcelain cups and pieces of thread are fragile. Things that do not break so easily when you apply force to them we call strong or resilient, even robust. A cast-iron pan, for instance. However, there is a third category here that is often overlooked. It includes those things that actually get stronger or improve when they are met with a stressor (up to a point). Take weight-lifting. If you try to lift something too heavy, you’ll tear a muscle; but lifting more appropriate weights will strengthen your muscles over time. This property can be said to apply to living things generally, as in the famous aphorism ‘what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger’. Strangely, we don’t really have a word for this property, this opposite of fragility.

For author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, this is a real shame, for when we look closely, it turns out that a lot of things (indeed the most important things) have, or are subject to, this property. Indeed, for Taleb, pretty much anything living, and the complex things that these living things create (like societies, economic systems, businesses etc.) have, or must confront this property in some way. This is important to know, because understanding this can help us understand how to improve these things (or profit from them), and failing to understand it can cause us to unwittingly harm or even destroy them (and be harmed by them).
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
10 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Nikolaj Leischner am 22. Dezember 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
In this book Nassim Taleb applies his observations and theories from "The Black Swan Event" and "Fooled By Randomness" onto different aspects of life. By that he more or less constructs a philosophy for life. As in the previous books his writing is very vivid and easy to read. At times he cannot help but directly attack his intellectual opponents (or rather enemies). In these instances his writing becomes kind of polemic. I agree with his arguments, and his anger may be justified but I suspect the book would feel more credible if he had left some of this out.

So should you read this?

If you want hear a compelling argument against modernism, interventionism, and the contemporary manifestations of fortune-telling from the point of view of a rational skeptic - then yes. If you just want to become familiar with the central idea of Nassim Taleb then you would be better off reading one of his other two books. If you already have read one of them and liked it then chances are you will like this one as well.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von H. Kaiser am 25. August 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Taleb geht von einer so einfach wie überzeugenden Grundidee aus: Wenn immer möglich sollten wir unser Leben, unsere politischen Systeme, unsere wirtschaftlichen Systeme so einrichten, dass sie nicht abstürzen, wenn sie von einem eng umschriebenen Optimum abweichen (fragile Systeme), sondern dass sie sogar von seltenen Abweichungen profitieren können (antifragile Systeme). Unter anderem illustriert er den Unterschied anhand des aktuellen Bankensystems und des Flugverkehrs. Das Bankensystem ist fragil: Der Absturz einer Bank kann das ganze System zum Einsturz bringen. Der Flugverkehr ist antifragil: Der Absturz eines einzelnen Flugzeugs ist zwar für die Betroffenen tragisch, gefährdet aber das ganze System nicht; ja wenn man den Absturzhergang sauber auswertet kann das System sogar profitieren indem es sicherer wird. Für interessierte Leser hinterlegt Taleb das ganze auch mathematisch und folgert u.a., dass man nicht versuchen soll, fragile Systeme mit Hilfe von Prognosen und steuernden Eingriffen am Leben zu erhalten - da das schweirig bis unmöglich ist - sondern dass man besser in den Aufbau antifragiler Systeme investiert.
Das alles ist ohne weiteres fünf Sterne werte - oder oder sogar sechs! Aber dann verliert er sich beim Versuch, die Konsequenzen der Idee in alle mögliche Bereiche zu tragen bei der ausführlichen Darstellung, warum er sich am Mittwoch vegan ernährt und am Freitag Steaks ist. Und das wird einfach langweilig. Mindestens zwei Drittel des Buches sind einfach überflüssig. Man arbeitet sich durch in der Hoffnung, nochmals irgendwo auf eine brillante Idee zu stossen - und wird enttäuscht.
Kurz zusammengefasst: Das erste Drittel lesen. Es lohnt sich wirklich! Den Rest vergessen.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Walter Guth am 24. Dezember 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Exposing the fallacies of over-hyped risk management and doing so in an amusing manner may help in avoiding the next crisis. On the downside I found too many repetitions, over-simplified and sometimes inexact mathematical explanations, and even negative name-dropping can become boring.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
33 von 41 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Sebastian Sandig am 4. Februar 2013
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Wollte man das umfangreiche Buch in einem einzigen Satz zusammenfassen, müßte dieser lauten: Keiner ist so schlau wie Nassim!
Denn alle kriegen sie hier ihr Fett weg: Ökonomen, Statistiker, Philosophen, Naturwissenschaftler, Wissenschaftstheoretiker usw. usf. Daß der Autor in vielen Disziplinen offenkundig nicht einmal Oberflächenwissen besitzt - was verschlägt's? Das macht ihm das Kritisieren um so einfacher.

Taleb brüstet sich damit, eben nicht akademisch zu schreiben. So gerät das Buch zu einer äußerst willkürlichen Auswahl von Anekdoten, die, wo notwendig, auch noch gehörig zurechtgebogen werden, um die Ansichten des Autors zu stützen. Davor bleiben auch die von ihm so verehrten Werke der Antike nicht verschont, die er - stolz darauf, sie im Original zu lesen - oft auch noch so falsch zitiert, daß es jedem Latein-Abiturienten die Nackenhaare aufstellen würde. ("Magnus Opus" - brrrr...)

Argument ist alles, was dem Autor nützt.
Beispiele?
Seine These, naturwissenschaftliche Bildung sei nicht die Voraussetzung, sondern das Resultat des Reichtums einer Gesellschaft, "beweist" er am Beispiel Kuwait. Japan? Nie gehört.
Weiters: Die Naturwissenschaften würden in ihrer Theoriebildung immer den Werken von Ingenieuren und anderen findigen Bastlern hinterhereilen. Computerchips, Laser, GPS? Nie gehört.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen