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Antelope Wife (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 21. Oktober 2002


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 256 Seiten
  • Verlag: Flamingo (21. Oktober 2002)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0007136366
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007136360
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13 x 1,7 x 19,7 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (5 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 189.341 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

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As Louise Erdrich's magical novel The Antelope Wife opens, a cavalry soldier pursues a dog with an Ojibwa baby strapped to its back. For days he follows them through "the vast carcass of the world west of the Otter Tail River" until finally the dog allows him to approach and handle the child--a girl, not yet weaned, who latches onto his nipples until, miraculously, they begin to give milk. In another kind of novel, this might be a metaphor. But this is the fictional world of Louise Erdrich, where myth is woven deeply into the fabric of everyday life. A famous cake tastes of grief, joy, and the secret ingredient: fear. The tie that binds the antelope wife to her husband is, literally, the strip of sweetheart calico he used to yoke her hand to his. Legendary characters sew beads into colorful patterns, and these patterns become the design of the novel itself.

The Antelope Wife centers on the Roys and the Shawanos, two closely related Ojibwa families living in modern-day Gakahbekong, or Minneapolis. Urban Indians of mixed blood, they are "scattered like beads off a necklace and put back together in new patterns, new strings," and Erdrich follows them through two failed marriages, a "kamikaze" wedding, and several tragic deaths. But the plot also loops and circles back, drawing in a 100-year-old murder, a burned Ojibwa village, a lost baby, several dead twins, and another baby nursed on father's milk.

The familiar Erdrich themes are all here--love, family, history, and the complex ways these forces both bind and separate the generations, stitching them into patterns as complex as beadwork. At least initially, this swirl of characters, narratives, time lines, and connections can take a little getting used to; several of the story lines do not match up until the book's conclusion. But in the end, Erdrich's lovely, lyrical language prevails, and the reader succumbs to the book's own dreamlike logic. As The Antelope Wife closes, Erdrich steps back to address readers directly for the first time, and the moment expands the book's elaborate patterns well beyond the confines of its pages. "Who is beading us?" she asks. "Who are you and who am I, the beader or the bit of colored glass sewn onto the fabric of the earth?... We stand on tiptoe, trying to see over the edge, and only catch a glimpse of the next bead on the string, and the woman's hand moving, one day, the next, and the needle flashing over the horizon." -- Mary Park, editor -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

'A fiercely imagined tale of love and loss, a story that manages to transform tragedy into comic redemption, sorrow into heroic survival.' New York Times 'This is realism at its most magical, in a novel as satisfying as any Erdrich has written.' Kirkus 'Richly cadenced, deeply textured, Erdrich's writing has the lustre and sheen of poetry.' Los Angeles Times '[An] extraordinary new offering of history, lore, obsession, loss, and love. Beautifully, extravagantly, in narrative fragments that mix metaphor and story, Erdrich creates a seemingly haphazard, totally absorbing series of oblique snapshots of these characters.' San Francisco Chronicle

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Einleitungssatz
Deep in the past during a spectacular cruel raid upon an isolated Ojibwa village mistaken for hostile during the scare over the starving Sioux, a dog bearing upon its back a frame-board tikinagun enclosing a child in moss, velvet, embroideries of beads, was frightened into the vast carcass of the world west of the Otter Tail River. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Douglas A. Greenberg am 16. Juli 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I was disappointed in Louise Erdrich's previous novel, *Tales of Burning Love*, which I thought was overly sensationalistic--a bit "Hollywood" for my taste. In *The Antelope Wife*, however, she has returned to an approach that is reminiscent of her first and most triumphant novel, *Love Medicine*. She writes in a style that may be difficult for some readers to accept--no,it's not "obscure" in the sense of a James Joyce novel, but she changes voices, time frames, and situations constantly. The result is a tapestry-like narrative that is uniquely effective, in my view. Erdrich has a way with words that is rare in today's literary world, despite the countless novels that are published annually. Moreover, because of her own Native American heritage, she is able to convey with incredible effectiveness the realities of past and present life and consciousness within those Indian cultures with which she is familiar.
This is a fine work, one that makes me look forward all the more to Louise Erdrich's next book.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von K. L. Cotugno am 29. Januar 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
With each book, my admiration grows for this writer. Her attention to detail, characterizations, interweaving of mysticism and reality -- and with all, an original dash of humor laced with sadness. As with Burning Tales of Love, she weaves many disparate threads together, creating a narrative blanket that you never want to unwrap from. I've read everything she's written, and in this day when prizes such as the National Book Award mean so much in sales and recognition, it amazes me that her work isn't at least among the finalists.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
To follow the trail of Erdrich's narrative in The Antelope Wife, remember a few essential things:
1. Time is not a linear process but a pool of information at which we drink. On the last page the story folds back nearly a hundred years to its beginning and, in the same paragraph, reaches forward twenty-five years past its own end, because what we need to know swims quietly in those two places.
2. The Going Out is always temporary. Always, Coming Home is good. Everything is out of balance until the antelope wife is allowed to go home.
3. Laughing at the silliness of love is neither impious nor cynical. Like Tales of Burning Love, The Antelope Wife ends with a ludicrous love scene, almost as funny as Jack's peanut race and wonderfully touching.
4. It was written, as Erdrich wisely warns us, before the suicide of her husband, Michael Dorris.

Anglo hippies, during the Vietnam War, were endlessly puzzled by American Indian patriotism; they looked for explanations in irony, innocence, 'warrior values.' The truth is simple. American Indian cultures are essentially conservative, conservators of home, tradition, the foundations that the past lays for the future. If their enemies are also conservative, so what? If your enemies love dancing, do you learn not to?

Erdrich's stories turn like foraging herds through their own territory, back upon themselves. They turn upon meals, because the Ojibwa and Cree worried enough about food to create a spirit of starvation, the windigo. The windigo dog, whose stories balance against so much of the novel's action, is that spirit, wary but accommodated.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is beautiful and sad -- intelligent and thoughtful. The author has great empathy for all of her characters -- the good and the bad -- the stable and the disturbed. The twin-ness of the stories and the characters is what achieves this empathy -- it is an exploration, not an apology for the complexities of people. The narrative voices throughout the novel are fraught with a touching and genuine emotion that refrains from becoming sappy. It is difficult to read the woes and ponderings of these characters and to avoid an empathy -- a reading between the lines -- that relate to the author's personal woes. If you wondered, as I did, what effect her personal trials would have on her fiction, this book answers that question better than any interview could. I look forward to her next effort.
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I finished Antelope Wife 3 days ago and find myself thinking about windigo dogs and an Ojibwa baby nursing Roy. As I miss my turn and screech through another yellow light sweet crumbs melt in my mouth and slide into my gut. I constantly slide in and out of this story. The author is more than grace, more intense than sweet sage and provides a circle for us to travel sweetly within. This story leaves me clammy, sweating with tear-stained eyes and a half-smile on my face.
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