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Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models (Addison-Wesley Series in Object-Oriented Software Engineerin) [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Martin Fowler , Ward Cunningham , Ralph Johnson
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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Patterns are higher-order designs that can be reused across projects and types of computer systems. Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models defines over 70 patterns, beginning with some from the business world, such as the Party and Accountability patterns, which define the players in organizations and whom they report to. Many of the other patterns are drawn from the health care industry and mainly show patterns of doctor-patient interactions.

The patterns for financial markets will probably be accessible for the majority of readers. Author Martin Fowler defines a Transaction pattern (and related patterns) as well as several patterns for the Accounting of Objects. He moves on to modeling stock markets with Portfolio, Quote, and Scenario patterns, which define how a price for a stock is determined for a given moment. Interestingly, he establishes patterns for Forward Contracts (for derivatives) as well as Options, and so takes on a complicated area in today's financial markets.

Fowler's considerable design experience in these fields is beneficial, as he is able to define each pattern in both text and software engineering diagrams. Only rarely does the author provide implementations of these designs and those that are furnished are done in Smalltalk, which makes this book more suitable for those who have experience in object design.

Synopsis

This innovative book recognizes the need within the object-oriented community for a book that goes beyond the tools and techniques of the typical methodology book. In Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models, Martin Fowler focuses on the end result of object-oriented analysis and design - the models themselves. He shares with you his wealth of object modeling experience and his keen eye for identifying repeating problems and transforming them into reusable models. Analysis Patterns provides a catalogue of patterns that have emerged in a wide range of domains including trading, measurement, accounting and organizational relationships. Recognizing that conceptual patterns cannot exist in isolation, the author also presents a series of "support patterns" that discuss how to turn conceptual models into software that in turn fits into an architecture for a large information system. Included in each pattern is the reasoning behind their design, rules for when they should and should not be used, and tips for implementation.

The examples presented in this book comprise a cookbook of useful models and insight into the skill of reuse that will improve analysis, modeling and implementation.0201895420B07092001

Buchrückseite

This innovative book recognizes the need within the object-oriented community for a book that goes beyond the tools and techniques of the typical methodology book. In Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models, Martin Fowler focuses on the end result of object-oriented analysis and design - the models themselves. He shares with you his wealth of object modeling experience and his keen eye for identifying repeating problems and transforming them into reusable models. Analysis Patterns provides a catalogue of patterns that have emerged in a wide range of domains including trading, measurement, accounting and organizational relationships.

Recognizing that conceptual patterns cannot exist in isolation, the author also presents a series of "support patterns" that discuss how to turn conceptual models into software that in turn fits into an architecture for a large information system. Included in each pattern is the reasoning behind their design, rules for when they should and should not be used, and tips for implementation. The examples presented in this book comprise a cookbook of useful models and insight into the skill of reuse that will improve analysis, modeling and implementation.



0201895420B07092001

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Martin Fowler is an independent consultant who has applied objects to pressing business problems for more than a decade. He has consulted on systems in fields such as health care, financial trading, and corporate finance. His clients include Chrysler, Citibank, UK National Health Service, Andersen Consulting, and Netscape Communications. In addition, Fowler is a regular speaker on objects, the Unified Modeling Language, and patterns. 0201895420AB07242003

Prolog. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Not long ago, no books were available on object-oriented analysis and design. Now there are so many that it is impossible for any practitioner to keep up with them all. Most of these books concentrate on teaching a notation, suggesting a simple process for modeling, and illustrating it with a few simple examples. Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models is a different kind of book. Instead of focusing on the process - how to do modeling - it concentrates on the result of the process - the models themselves.

I am a consultant in object modeling for information systems. Clients ask me to train staff on modeling and to provide mentoring on projects. Much of my skill comes from a knowledge of modeling techniques and how to use them. More important, however, is my experience in actually creating many models and regularly seeing problems repeat themselves. Frequently I find that many aspects of a project revisit problems I have faced before. That experience allows me to reuse models I have built before, improve them, and adapt them to new demands.

Over the last few years, more and more people have also become aware of this phenomenon. We have realized that the typical methodology books, though valuable, only present the first step in a learning process that must also capture the actual things that are built. This realization has flowered into the patterns movement. This is a varied group of people, representing many different interests and opinions yet sharing the goal of propagating useful patterns of software systems.

As a result of the diversity of this patterns community, we have had difficulty in defining the term pattern. We all think we can recognize a pattern when we see it, we think most of us would agree in most cases, but we cannot come up with a single definition. Here is my definition: A pattern is an idea that has been useful in one practical context and will probably be useful in others.

I like to leave the definition quite loose because I wish to stay as close to the underlying motivation of patterns, without adding too many restrictive amendments. A pattern can have many forms, and each form adds specializations that are useful for that kind of pattern. (Section 1.2 discusses the current state of the patterns world and where this book fits in.)This book is about patterns in analysis, patterns that reflect conceptual structures of business processes rather than actual software implementations. Most of the chapters discuss patterns for various business domains. Such patterns are hard to classify into traditional vertical areas (manufacturing, finance, health care, and so on) because they are often useful in several areas. These patterns are important because they help us to understand how people perceive the world. It is valuable to base a computer system's design on this perception and, indeed, to change that perception - which is where business process reengineering (BPR) comes in.

Conceptual patterns cannot exist in isolation, however. Conceptual models are only useful to software engineers if they can see how to implement them. In this book I present patterns that can be used to turn conceptual models into software, and I discuss how that software fits into an architecture for a large information system. I also discuss specific implementation tips with the patterns.

I wrote this book because this was the book that I wanted to read when I started out. Modelers will find ideas in this book to help them begin working in a new domain. The patterns contain useful models, the reasoning behind their designs, and when they should and should not be applied. With this information a modeler can adapt the models to fit a specific problem. The patterns in this book can also be used in reviewing models - to see what might have been left out and to suggest some alternatives that may lead to improvement. When I review a project, I usually compare what I see with the patterns I have learned from previous work. I have found that being aware of patterns in my work helps me to apply my past experiences more easily. Patterns like this also uncover modeling issues that go beyond what can be covered in a simple text book. By discussing why we model things the way we do, we gain a greater understanding of how to improve our modeling, even if we don't use the patterns directly.

Structure of this Book

This book is divided into two sections. The first section covers analysis patterns, which are patterns from conceptual business models. They provide key abstractions from domains such as trading, measurement, accounting, and organizational relationships. The patterns are conceptual because they represent the way people think about the business, rather than the way a computer system is designed. The chapters in this section stress alternative patterns that can be used, and the strengths and weaknesses of those alternatives. Although each pattern will clearly be useful to those working in the same domain, the basic pattern is often useful in other domains.

The second section focuses on support patterns, which help you use analysis patterns. Support patterns show how analysis patterns fit into an information systems architecture, how the constructs of conceptual models turn into software interfaces and implementations, and how certain advanced modeling constructs relate to simpler structures.To describe these patterns, I need a notation. The appendix provides a brief discussion of the notation I use and what the symbols mean. I do not use a single method but prefer to mix techniques from different methods. The appendix is not designed to be a tutorial on techniques, but it should provide an outline and refresh your memory. It also tells you where to find a tutorial on the techniques I use.

Each section is divided into chapters. Each chapter on analysis patterns contains patterns that are related by a loose notion of subject area, influenced by the projects that spawned them. This organization reflects the fact that any pattern must come from a practical context. Each pattern appears in its own subsection within a chapter. I do not use any of the formal headings for patterns that are used by some patterns authors (see Section 1.2.2). I describe each pattern in a form that is as close to the original project form as is reasonable, with a minimum of abstraction. I add examples to show the use of the pattern within its original domain and also to suggest how the pattern might be used in other domains. One of the greatest difficulties of patterns is abstracting them into other domains; I follow the principle that this should be left to the reader (see Section 1.2.3).

This book is thus a catalog, rather than a book to be read from cover to cover. I have tried to write each chapter in such a way that it can be read independently from the other chapters. (This is not always possible, however. Whenever a chapter requires that another chapter be read first, I say so in the chapter introduction.) Each chapter has an introduction that explains the general subject area of the chapter, summarizes the patterns in the chapter, and says what projects the patterns originated from.

How to Read this Book

I suggest reading all of Chapter 1 first and then reading each chapter introduction. Then feel free to delve into the chapters in any order you like. If you are not familiar with the approach I take to modeling, or the notation and concepts I use, read the appendix. The Table of Patterns gives a brief summary of what each pattern is about, so you can use that to help you explore or to find a pattern when you come back to the book at a later time. It is important to stress that each pattern in this book is useful outside the domain that gave it birth. Thus I encourage you to look into chapters that you might think are outside your field of interest. For example, I found that models of observation and measurement designed for health...
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