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Ambient Findability: What We Find Changes Who We Become [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Peter Morville
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Kurzbeschreibung

11. Oktober 2005
How do you find your way in an age of information overload? How can you filter streams of complex information to pull out only what you want? Why does it matter how information is structured when Google seems to magically bring up the right answer to your questions? What does it mean to be "findable" in this day and age? This eye-opening new book examines the convergence of information and connectivity. Written by Peter Morville, author of the groundbreaking Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, the book defines our current age as a state of unlimited findability. In other words, anyone can find anything at any time. Complete navigability. Morville discusses the Internet, GIS, and other network technologies that are coming together to make unlimited findability possible. He explores how the melding of these innovations impacts society, since Web access is now a standard requirement for successful people and businesses. But before he does that, Morville looks back at the history of wayfinding and human evolution, suggesting that our fear of being lost has driven us to create maps, charts, and now, the mobile Internet. The book's central thesis is that information literacy, information architecture, and usability are all critical components of this new world order. Hand in hand with that is the contention that only by planning and designing the best possible software, devices, and Internet, will we be able to maintain this connectivity in the future. Morville's book is highlighted with full color illustrations and rich examples that bring his prose to life. Ambient Findability doesn't preach or pretend to know all the answers. Instead, it presents research, stories, and examples in support of its novel ideas. Are we truly at a critical point in our evolution where the quality of our digital networks will dictate how we behave as a species? Is findability indeed the primary key to a successful global marketplace in the 21st century and beyond. Peter Morville takes you on a thought-provoking tour of these memes and more -- ideas that will not only fascinate but will stir your creativity in practical ways that you can apply to your work immediately. "A lively, enjoyable and informative tour of a topic that's only going to become more important." --David Weinberger, Author, Small Pieces Loosely Joined and The Cluetrain Manifesto "I envy the young scholar who finds this inventive book, by whatever strange means are necessary. The future isn't just unwritten--it's unsearched." --Bruce Sterling, Writer, Futurist, and Co-Founder, The Electronic Frontier Foundation "Search engine marketing is the hottest thing in Internet business, and deservedly so. Ambient Findability puts SEM into a broader context and provides deeper insights into human behavior. This book will help you grow your online business in a world where being found is not at all certain." --Jakob Nielsen, Ph.D., Author, Designing Web Usability: The Practice of Simplicity "Information that's hard to find will remain information that's hardly found--from one of the fathers of the discipline of information architecture, and one of its most experienced practitioners, come penetrating observations on why findability is elusive and how the act of seeking changes us." --Steve Papa, Founder and Chairman, Endeca "Whether it's a fact or a figure, a person or a place, Peter Morville knows how to make it findable. Morville explores the possibilities of a world where everything can always be found--and the challenges in getting there--in this wide-ranging, thought-provoking book." --Jesse James Garrett, Author, The Elements of User Experience "It is easy to assume that current searching of the World Wide Web is the last word in finding and using information. Peter Morville shows us that search engines are just the beginning. Skillfully weaving together information science research with his own extensive experience, he develops for the reader a feeling for the near future when information is truly findable all around us. There are immense implications, and Morville's lively and humorous writing brings them home." --Marcia J. Bates, Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles "I've always known that Peter Morville was smart. After reading Ambient Findability, I now know he's (as we say in Boston) wicked smart. This is a timely book that will have lasting effects on how we create our future. --Jared Spool, Founding Principal, User Interface Engineering "In Ambient Findability, Peter Morville has put his mind and keyboard on the pulse of the electronic noosphere. With tangible examples and lively writing, he lays out the challenges and wonders of finding our way in cyberspace, and explains the mutually dependent evolution of our changing world and selves. This is a must read for everyone and a practical guide for designers." --Gary Marchionini, Ph.D., University of North Carolina "Find this book! Anyone interested in making information easier to find, or understanding how finding and being found is changing, will find this thoroughly researched, engagingly written, literate, insightful and very, very cool book well worth their time. Myriad examples from rich and varied domains and a valuable idea on nearly every page. Fun to read, too! --Joseph Janes, Ph.D., Founder, Internet Public Library

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 204 Seiten
  • Verlag: O'Reilly & Associates; Auflage: 1 (11. Oktober 2005)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0596007655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596007652
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 22,9 x 15,4 x 1,2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 193.802 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Synopsis

How do you find your way in an age of information overload? How can you filter streams of complex information to pull out only what you want? Why does it matter how information is structured when Google seems to magically bring up the right answer to your questions? What does it mean to be 'findable' in this day and age? This eye-opening new book examines the convergence of information and connectivity. Written by Peter Morville, author of the groundbreaking "Information Architecture for the World Wide Web", the book defines our current age as a state of unlimited findability. In other words, anyone can find anything at any time. Complete navigability. Morville discusses the Internet, GIS, and other network technologies that are coming together to make unlimited findability possible. He explores how the melding of these innovations impacts society, since Web access is now a standard requirement for successful people and businesses. But before he does that, Morville looks back at the history of way finding and human evolution, suggesting that our fear of being lost has driven us to create maps, charts, and now, the mobile Internet.

The book's central thesis is that information literacy, information architecture, and usability are all critical components of this new world order. Hand in hand with that is the contention that only by planning and designing the best possible software, devices, and Internet, will we be able to maintain this connectivity in the future. Morville's book is highlighted with full color illustrations and rich examples that bring his prose to life. "Ambient Findability" doesn't preach or pretend to know all the answers. Instead, it presents research, stories, and examples in support of its novel ideas. Are we truly at a critical point in our evolution where the quality of our digital networks will dictate how we behave as a species? Is findability indeed the primary key to a successful global marketplace in the 21st century and beyond? Peter Morville takes you on a thought-provoking tour of these themes and more - ideas that will not only fascinate but will stir your creativity in practical ways that you can apply to your work immediately.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Peter Morville is President and Founder of Semantic Studios, a leading information architecture and knowledge management consulting firm. From 1994 to 2001, Peter was Chief Executive Officer and a co-owner of Argus Associates, a pioneering information architecture design firm with world-class clients including 3Com, AT&T, Compaq, Ernst & Young, Ford, IBM, Microsoft, Procter & Gamble, and the Weather Channel. He also served as Executive Director of the ACIA. Over the past 8 years, Peter has written and spoken extensively about information architecture, business strategy, and knowledge management. He has been interviewed by Business Week, Knowledge Management magazine, MSNBC, and the Wall Street Journal.

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28 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Buch für Generalisten zu einem Topthema 22. November 2005
Format:Taschenbuch
Peter Moreville ist einer der Gründungsväter der Information Architecture. Seine Leidenschaft für "Findability" (noch findet sich kein deutscher Begriff dafür), also dem Grad an Auffindbarkeit einer Person, eines Dokuments, eines Unternehmens, einer Information, zeigt sich in dem sehr breiten multidisziplinären Ansatz, den er für sein Buch gewählt hat.
Nach der Klärung des Begriffs "Findability" im ersten Kapitel folgt eine kurze Einführung zu Verhaltensweisen und Mittel um als Tier oder Mensch in der realen und digitalen Umwelt seinen Weg und sein Ziel zu finden.
Im dritten Kapitel zeigt Moreville die Grenzen des Information Retrievals auf Basis von Erkenntnissen der evolutionären Psychologie auf.
Kapitel vier ist den neuen Technologien gewidmet, die mehr Daten und Objekte denn je auffindbar machen werden.
"Findability" wird im fünften Kapitel im Kontext der aktuellen und zukünftigen Möglichkeiten für das Online Marketing gestellt. "Findability" ist dabei in seinen Augen eine von sieben Qualitäten einer Online Information (und natürlich, die heute am meisten unterschätzte...).
Der Konflikt zwischen den Architekten des Semantic Web, die stark auf Strukturen und Ontologien setzen und den Akteuren an der "Social Software" Front, die stark auf freies "Tagging" setzen, ist eines der beiden Themen des sechsten Kapitels. Dabei legt Moreville Wert auf ein UND der beiden Positionen. Im zweiten Teil prophezeit er das Ende der Daten und geht auf einen sehr breit angelegten Dokumentbegriff ein.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Amazon.com: 3.9 von 5 Sternen  55 Rezensionen
112 von 119 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Frustrating - a few good references, but no good insights 19. Januar 2006
Von John H. Kaplan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Ambient Findability can be summed up as follows: There is a lot of information on the web so it's hard to find what you want, it's going to get worse, and the author claims to know what to do about it but won't tell you.

The book starts out with great promise. I believed it would contain insights, sage advice, and practical details about how to make my web pages findable to my audience. The first couple of chapters were great introductory material, and they whetted my appetite for the meaty material that was sure to follow.

Then, there was some more introductory material, and I began to notice that the author threw a lot of quotes around but didn't explore them very deeply, and threw in illustrations of things mentioned in passing in the book that really didn't illuminate anything. For example, he mentioned the Tower of Babel, and then presented an illustration of a Bruegel painting of it, which illustrated... not much. After a dozen of these you wonder if they were just trying to make the book look bigger.

Around page 100 or so, I wondered if the author would ever stop glossing over introductory material, and actually get to the meat of the book. Unfortunately this never happened as far as I was concerned, and so my frustration. Ambient Findability never delivered any practical tips or any insightful theories that could help an aspiring web designer.

One thing you can say for the author, he has read a lot of great books, and Ambient Findability contains references to many great classics worth reading, including Blink, The Cathedral and the Bazaar, the Cluetrain Manifesto, and Don't Make Me Think. I wish the author had chosen to emulate those books and had worked to develop and present some insights of his own, rather than just drop quotes from other sources. As it is, this book is good for gathering a few references to other better literature, and not much else.
37 von 40 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Great topics but written like a long blog 8. Januar 2007
Von Pat - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
My everyday work involves search engines, both using them for research and developing the technology. I was deeply impressed by the lengthy and highly enthusiastic reviews posted here. One day, I wandered into a bookstore and saw the book. I bought it without even opening it. I have to say that given the high expectation, I was quite disappointed by the book.

I read the book in detail for most parts of it and skimmed through the rest of it. The book I like most is that it is not just about Google, blog search, myspace, etc. It attempted to give a broad analysis of the topic, mostly from non-technical viewpoints, drawing literatures from very diversified sources, AI, social science, politics, history, etc. I learned terms like folksonomies, boundary objects and a lot of stories and quotes that I can use to make my next presentation on the same subject more interesting. This is what I gained from the book.

The main weakness of the book is twofold. First, the book does not help you understand more about the problem of findability and where the future might be, let alone giving you a hint on the solution; it repeats what most people have already known and re-asserted it with more discussions and examples. Second, the writing adopted a style commonly found in online articles and blogs. Beautiful but confusing statements. The style is good for online writing where creating controversies and arguments is an important goal of writing, but I won't expect it from a book. For example, on Page 38, the author said "... visualization approaches fail because there's no there there." It is not only hard to understand, but once you do you find it not true. The purpose of information visualization is not to represent pages in 3D space with edges representing the distances between pages (see what the author quoted in the same paragraph) but one of the important goals, and obstacles, is to extract the themes of the pages and connect the themes based on their semantic relationships. A careful look at Fig 2-14, a screendump from Grokker, would reveal that what were shown on the screen were topics, not pages. On Page 143, when talking about a client's website become unsearchable because texts on the pages were rendered as images, the author said "one the web, the journey often begins with the destination." Beautiful, but the truthfulness of the statement depends on which end of the pipe you are looking into. There are too many examples like these that don't stand deep logical reasoning. A full elaboration will make this review too long.

After reading the book, I felt like I have read a long blog from the author. Like reading any blog written by great minds, you often find shining ideas here and there, but you have to endure the style of writing and imprecisions, and organize the thoughts yourself. This is what the author advocated anyway (Chapter 7 Inspired Decisions).
16 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen What You Can't Find, You'll Never Know. Read This Book. 3. Oktober 2005
Von Casey Bisson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Morville's work is the most appropriate follow-on to the usability concepts so well promoted by Steven Krug in his Don't Make Me Think and Jakob Nielsen in Designing Web Usability. "Findability," Morville argues, is a necessary component in the success and propagation of an idea or detail or fact. Business and non-profits alike will benefit from understanding the value of findability.

Obviously, findability serves more than just internet marketers and hucksters. Morville offers an example of a nonprofit medical research agency and how the findability -- in this case, the search engine ranking of their web content -- affected people's ability to get authoritative, quality information on the web.

"[T]he [web development] team", Morville writes, "had to look beyond the narrow goals of web site design, to see their role in advancing the broader mission of disseminating [...] information to people in need."

Morville could have asked "if a remarkable idea springs up in the forest, but it doesn't show up in the first page of Google search results, is it really all that remarkable?" But findability is more than that, and there's a lot more to the book. Morville discusses findability in depth, considering both its current and possible future implications. Eventually, of course, findability will butt up against our notions of privacy, and Morville explores that as well.

Though the book will serve information architects, software designers building anything related to web content management, web designers, marketers, and PR flacks well, its real gift is to the teachers, researchers, librarians, and public servants who handle so much valuable data that must (or, in some cases, must not) be findable.
45 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Infuriatingly Fluffy 26. Dezember 2005
Von Jennifer L. Stock - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I am deeply disappointed with O"Reilly. It is with them that I place the most blame for the personal misfortune I have suffered from paying $29.95 for this book. Their line of books has been consistently timely and exhaustive of the major technology topics of the day. When I discovered this title in their catalog, I was excited by the possibility of finding a solid work on some of the emerging ontological challenges and characteristics of the modern Web. But that is not what this text is, and for the reasons listed below, I don't believe they should ever have allowed this book to be published.

My chief complaint is Morville's inability to do more than leap around a subject, quoting other sources aggressively but shedding no original light of his own. This is combined with the unfortunate editorial choice of using the same symbols for both footnotes and bibliographic entries. It seemed that he did a poor job of citing all his sources; if he cited them as often as required, the pages would bristle with numbers, because the text is such a hodgepodge of other people's words and ideas.

The entire book reads like the first few pages of a scope document, or a sales pitch, wild with glib, facile, sophomoric rhetoric, lacking any substance, intended to excite and to provoke, but providing nothing to back up the emotional language. And some of it is downright incomprehensible: "Our future will be at least as messy as our present. But we will muddle through as usual, satisficing under conditions of bounded rationality. And if we are lucky, and if we make good decisions about how to intertwingle our lives with technology, perhaps we too can reclaim a fragment of asylum." (p.97)

When the work is original, it often disintegrates into a series of terse and mostly unhelpful definition lists.

I kept asking myself: where is the value add? The text is profusely illustrated in a high-color format unusual for an O'Reilly book, but the images consist of low-resolution screen grabs which are largely unnecessary for an understanding of the material under discussion. This whiff of "shovelware" is unsurprising, given Morville's research methodology: "For most of my research, I found what I needed from where I sit, via the free Web, online databases, and my personal bookshelf." (p.172)

The only concrete recommendations concerning increasing findability that I could glean are to stay away from bitmapped (i.e. graphic, not live) text in websites and replace "pushy" marketing messages with more verbose link descriptions. Perhaps the text would have been more focused if the author was able to define his professional identity more clearly. In each chapter he seemed to wear a different hat: designer, librarian, information architect, findability engineer. For him, "words are messy little critters" (p.15) but for the money I paid for this book and the time I invested in reading it, I would have hoped for an author with a little more control over the English language.

In a positive light, there are a few interesting anecdotes, mostly personal, and an explanation of the term "folksonomy" and the popularity and power of sites like Flicker and Delicious that those unfamiliar with the rise of user-contributed keywords as means of organizing large amounts of dynamic information will find helpful. And he makes the excellent point that web developers should pay attention to how their site is being found, and that viewing the discipline of search engine optimization as somehow sleazy or secondary is an excuse to ignore questions of context and to shirk one's responsibility to the user.

But as a whole, I cannot recommend this book, and am in fact going out of my way to warn other people about its content. Morville is a bright guy and he certainly has his mind in some interesting places. But I would have been better off reading his website. The material in "Ambient Findability" has all the buzzword-dense charm of the web but it exhibits its often frustrating lack of deep scholarship and originality. I hope O'Reilly exercises more caution in its selections for future titles of a more general nature.
23 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Many good references but not very concrete 30. Januar 2006
Von John Wetherbie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The back cover description of Ambient Findability begins with the following paragraph:

How do people find their way through an age of information overload? How can people combine streams of complex information to filter out only the parts they want? Why does it matter how information is structured when Google seems to magically bring up the right answer to people's questions?

If you expect these questions to be answered or even addressed at a reasonable level of detail then you will be disappointed. Ambient Findability is more like a collection of essays related to findability than a book about how to improve the design and implementation of products, information, web sites, etc., to make them easier to find. Because of some repetition across chapters and many figures that are unnecessary the book could be shorter than its short 179 pages.

The first chapter, Lost and Found, discusses how information is being used in new and interesting ways, presents a definition of findability, and a brief case study of work the author did on the National Cancer Institute web site. Chapter two presents how people have determined their location and how to get to where they want to go through history. Chapter Three, Information Interaction, reviews the difficulties of classifying and finding information and discusses Mooers (not a typo) Law which states that people will avoid obtaining information that is painful or troublesome to them. The fourth chapter deals with how products are incorporating information and findability. Chapters Five and Six, Push and Pull and The Sociosemantic Web, respectively, deal with issues that you might find in an information architecture book. The last chapter, Inspired Decisions, discusses the irrationality behind our so-called "rational" decisions, how information overload makes the situation worse, and the author's theory that all the information that flows through our senses shapes how we think and act.

The book does have a great number of references to interesting research and trends in the areas of information architecture, cognitive science, usability, and related areas. In fact, the number of references is the book's main strength as there were a number of interesting papers and research efforts mentioned of which I was unaware. However, the numerous references could also be considered a weakness since it appears that Morville does much more citing than explaining.

O'Reilly categorized Ambient Findability as a Marketing/Technology & Society book. The Technology & Society part strikes me as correct but I am not so sure about Marketing. If you are looking for markers or pointers to how information may be used in the future then this is an interesting book to read. If you are looking for concrete suggestions or discussions of how to improve findability in the here and now then this book is lacking.

Full disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of the book for review.
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