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[All Tomorrow's Parties] [by: William Gibson] (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 4. Februar 2003


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch
  • Verlag: Penguin USA (4. Februar 2003)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0425190447
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425190449
  • ASIN: B0073NCRTO
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 17 x 10,7 x 2,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.4 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (69 Kundenrezensionen)

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Produktbeschreibungen

All Tomorrow's Parties From the "New York Times" bestselling author who coined the term "cyberspace, " and who envisioned both the Internet and virtual reality before either existed, comes this bestselling novel--now in mass market paperback--that brings back his hero from "Idoru" in a startling tale of a shift in time and cyberspace. Full description

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Einleitungssatz
THROUGH this evening's tide of faces unregistered, unrecognized, amid hurrying black shoes, furled umbrellas, the crowd descending like a single organism into the station's airless heart, comes Shinya Yamazaki, his notebook clasped beneath his arm like the egg case of some modest but moderately successful marine species. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Naru Sundar am 4. November 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
To describe William Gibson's writing style in one word, it would probably be "energetic." Using a sharp staccato like pen, Gibson manages to construct unique and interesting scenarios. This book has all the characteristic Gibsonian qualities: distributed plot progression, characters covering both ends of the scale from cold and detached to drug crazed frenzy... it also manages to pull in a large number of characters from previous works (Virtual Light, Idoru).. Gibson's last trilogy (the Sprawl) was unique in that one never realized it was that much of a trilogy till the very end...
One annoying fact of this book is that it has a classic Gibson ending.. without giving anything away let's just say it required many readings of the ending before one felt satisfied. It seems the information density per sentence increases exponentially as one reaches the last few pages.
Still, the book is interesting and well worth the read..
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von L.C. am 19. Juni 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I've been a longstanding fan of Gibson's cyberpunk work since his groundbreaking novel, Neuromancer. This book continues his legacy of well-developed characters from the underbelly of the city. Gibson's virtuosity of prose is best shown in his vivid descriptions of the homeless living in Japan in a city of cardboard boxes.
Gibson's continual obsession with Japanese culture continues in this novel, and any anime otaku (extreme fan) will find many tributes to the pop culture of Japan. His finely tuned attention to detail in the scenes set in Japan made for highly entertaining reading.
In All Tommorow's Parties, we find ourselves once again associated with many of the characters in his previous novels, Idoru and Virtual Light. (Fortunately, the reader is not expected to 'know' these characters, so a previous reading of Idoru or Virtual Light will not preclude your enjoyment of this novel.)
However, by mid-novel, all this talk of nodal points fails to satisfy the reader - Gibson assumes too much of our understanding of the world that he has illustrated for us. Hints and allegations are made as to the significance of nodal points (that these points have the potential to bend the course of human history) but then these hints are never truly realized in any major way at the end of the novel. The novel ends suddenly, with no real feeling of resolution of the action that has come before. (I almost felt as if someone may have ripped the 'real' last chapter out of my copy.) We are dropped suddenly into this ending that does not seem nearly as elegantly constructed as the events leading up to it. Gibson's conclusions at the end of the novel are hardly cut-and-dry -- it takes work on the reader's part to try to understand his ending.
In conclusion, it's a worthy read, however, you may find yourself disappointed with the ending.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von L. Alper am 1. November 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
William Gibson is, without a doubt, the most masterful writer & predictor of the day after tomorrow. That said, I must admit "All Tomorrow's Parties" is not Gibson at his peak. Again, we're on "the Bridge", the brilliantly visualized "interstitial" community from "Virtual Light". The Bridge is one of Gibson's greatest conceits (after cyberspace) & it is always a pleasure to revisit. However, the events that bring us to this place never really seem to happen or even to be everted, & the cast of characters we are visiting it with really don't have much of a reason to be involved with the story except that Gibson seems to be stuck in the dreaded SF TRILOGY mode. Either he or his publishers seem convinced that his novels have to be published in triads ("Neuromancer", "Count Zero" & "Mona Lisa Overdrive" being the Sprawl cycle & now we have "Virtual Light", "Idoru" & "All Tomorrow's Parties" as the...what?... Bridge? cycle....)Unfortunately, this mind set does Gibson a dis-service as it requires him to stretch out stories & events that were clearly completed to his satisfaction in earlier works. "All Tomorrow's Parties" is very simply, a book in search of a plot. It seems to consist primarily of short sketches that are woven together but never really go anywhere. Gibson has introduced some new elements to his writing including a character based on himself & humor but if you're not a die hard Gibsonian this will be wasted on you. Basically, if you are unfamiliar with the man's writing, don't start here! Please, read the diamond sharp writing of "Neuromancer" or "Mona Lisa Overdrive" before picking this one up.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Chris Barker am 10. Januar 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I was introduced to Gibson in 90 by someone who could have well been a character in a Gibson short story. I can't remember how many times I've read and re-read the first four books. I keep a copy of Neuromancer on my Pilot. I liked Virtual Light and really liked Idoru, but if All Tomorrows Parties is supposed to be a conclusion to this trilogy I am even more dissapointed than if it were just a stand alone book.
I like the writing style, the quick prose and short chapters (like channel surfing between related programs), but my two beefs are the seemingly rushed/unresolved ending/plot elements. What happened to Laney in his box and what did the nano fax have to do with Rei Toei anyway? I would have liked to read more about Harding. The thing which seemed most forced was the last watch. Why was it connected to Harding and how could it be used to find him?  As sort of a nit picking aside, I still can't figure out why the book is titled All Tomorrows Parties. All the previous Velvet Underground references seemed to fit the stories (especially "First thing you learn is that you always gotta wait") but this one?
I don't read Gibson for "poetic" endings. I'm not whining for the "good old days" of Mona Lisa Overdrive, but I did not like this ending and am not satisfied if this is the end of this trilogy. Since this is not a long book I can't imagine that some fool editor cut out anything, maybe Gibson is trying to change? If so I'll wait for the paperback next time.
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