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Agile Software Engineering with Visual Studio: From Concept to Continuous Feedback (2nd Edition) (Microsoft Windows Development Series)
 
 

Agile Software Engineering with Visual Studio: From Concept to Continuous Feedback (2nd Edition) (Microsoft Windows Development Series) [Kindle Edition]

Sam Guckenheimer , Neno Loje
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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

Using agile methods and the tools of Visual Studio 2010, development teams can deliver higher-value software faster, systematically eliminate waste, and increase transparency throughout the entire development lifecycle. Now, Microsoft Visual Studio product owner Sam Guckenheimer and leading Visual Studio implementation consultant Neno Loje show how to make the most of Microsoft’s new Visual Studio 2010 Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) tools in your environment.

 

This book is the definitive guide to the application of agile development with Scrum and modern software engineering practices using Visual Studio 2010. You’ll learn how to use Visual Studio 2010 to empower and engage multidisciplinary, self-managing teams and provide the transparency they need to maximize productivity. Along the way, Guckenheimer and Loje help you overcome every major impediment that leads to stakeholder dissatisfaction–from mismatched schedules to poor quality, blocked builds to irreproducible bugs, and technology “silos” to geographic “silos.”

 

Coverage includes
• Accelerating the “flow of value” to customers in any software project, no matter how large or complex
• Empowering high-performance software teams and removing overhead in software delivery
• Automating “burndowns” and using dashboards to gain a real-time, multidimensional view of quality and progress
• Using Visual Studio 2010 to reduce or eliminate “no repro” bugs
• Automating deployment and virtualizing test labs to make continuous builds deployable
• Using Test Impact Analysis to quickly choose the right tests based on recent code changes
• Working effectively with sources, branches, and backlogs across distributed teams
• Sharing code, build automation, test, project and other data across .NET and Java teams
• Uncovering hidden architectural patterns in legacy software, so you can refactor changes more confidently
• Scaling Scrum to large, distributed organizations

 

Whatever your discipline, this book will help you use Visual Studio 2010 to focus on what really matters: building software that delivers exceptional value sooner and keeps customers happy far into the future.

 

 

Über den Autor

Sam Guckenheimer
When I wrote the predecessor of this book, I had been at Microsoft less than three years. I described my history like this:I joined Microsoft in 2003 to work on Visual Studio Team System (VSTS), the new product line that was just released at the end of 2005. As the group product planner, I have played chief customer advocate, a role that I have loved. I have been in the IT industry for twenty-some years, spending most of my career as a tester, project manager, analyst, and developer. As a tester, I've always understood the theoretical value of advanced developer practices, such as unit testing, code coverage, static analysis, and memory and performance profiling. At the same time, I never understood how anyone had the patience to learn the obscure tools that you needed to follow the right practices. As a project manager, I was always troubled that the only decent data we could get was about bugs. Driving a project from bug data alone is like driving a car with your eyes closed and only turning the wheel when you hit something. You really want to see the right indicators that you are on course, not just feel the bumps when you stray off it. Here, too, I always understood the value of metrics, such as code coverage and project velocity, but I never understood how anyone could realistically collect all that stuff. As an analyst, I fell in love with modeling. I think visually, and I found graphical models compelling ways to document and communicate. But the models always got out of date as soon as it came time to implement anything. And the models just didn't handle the key concerns of developers, testers, and operations. In all these cases, I was frustrated by how hard it was to connect the dots for the whole team. I loved the idea in Scrum (one of the Agile processes) of a "single product backlog"--one place where you could see all the work--but the tools people could actually use would fragment the work every which way. What do these requirements have to do with those tasks, and the model elements here, and the tests over there? And where's the source code in that mix? From a historical perspective, I think IT turned the corner when it stopped trying to automate manual processes and instead asked the question, "With automation, how can we reengineer our core business processes?" That's when IT started to deliver real business value. They say the cobbler's children go shoeless. That's true for IT, too. While we've been busy automating other business processes, we've largely neglected our own. Nearly all tools targeted for IT professionals and teams seem to still be automating the old manual processes. Those processes required high overhead before automation, and with automation, they still have high overhead. How many times have you gone to a 1-hour project meeting where the first 90 minutes were an argument about whose numbers were right? Now, with Visual Studio, we are seriously asking, "With automation, how can we reengineer our core IT processes? How can we remove the overhead from following good process? How can we make all these different roles individually more productive while integrating them as a high performance team?" Obviously, that's all still true.

Neno Loje
I started my career as a software developer--first as a hobby, later as profession. At the beginning of high school, I fell in love with writing software because it enabled me to create something useful by transforming an idea into something of actual value for someone else. Later, I learned that this was generating customer value. However, the impact and value were limited by the fact that I was just a single developer working in a small company, so I decided to focus on helping and teaching other developers. I started by delivering pure technical training, but the topics soon expanded to include process and people, because I realized that just introducing a new tool or a technology by itself does not necessarily make teams more successful. During the past six years as an independent ALM consultant and TFS specialist, I have helped many companies set up a team environment and software development process with VS. It has been fascinating to watch how removing unnecessary, manual activities makes developers and entire projects more productive. Every team is different and has its own problems. I've been surprised to see how many ways exist (both in process and tools) to achieve the same goal: deliver customer value faster though great software. When teams look back at how they worked before, without VS, they often ask themselves how they could have survived without the tools they use now. However, what had changed from the past were not only the tools, but also the way they work as a team. Application Lifecycle Management and practices from the Agile Consensus help your team to focus on the important things. VS and TFS are a pragmatic approach to implement ALM (even for small, nondistributed teams). If you're still not convinced, I urge you to try it out and judge for yourself.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 5960 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 352 Seiten
  • Gleichzeitige Verwendung von Geräten: Bis zu 5 Geräte gleichzeitig, je nach vom Verlag festgelegter Grenze
  • Verlag: Addison-Wesley Professional; Auflage: 2 (15. September 2011)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B005N8EX1G
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (5 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #240.296 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Scrum with Visual Studio 2010 24. Juni 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This book provides a great overview as well as specific guidelines for doing Scrum with Visual Studio 2010. I also own the previous edition by Sam Guckenheimer and must admit, the new 2nd edition is much more specific, with excellent advice for project leads.
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Format:Taschenbuch
Die etwas über 300 Seiten des Buches sind gefüllt mit jeder Menge Informationen rund um den agilen Softwareprozess. Das Buch deckt einmal den kompletten agilen Prozess, beginnend mit den Grundlagen agiler Methoden, den Scrum-Artefakten, wie diese mit den .NET Tools Visual Studio, Team Foundation Server und Test Manager im Team umgesetzt werden können, bis hin zum Erfassen von Kundenfeedback ab. Was die beiden Autoren, bedingt durch den begrenzten Umfang des Buches, nicht aufnehmen konnten, haben sie konsequent mit weiterführenden Links versehen. Damit bleibt der Leser bei offenen Fragen nicht auf der Strecke sondern findet recht leicht detailliertere Informationen.

Ein aus meiner Sicht idealer Begleiter für .NET Entwicklungsteams, die in die Welt der agilen Softwareentwicklung eintauchen wollen oder bereits mitten drin sind. Das Buch sollte jeder gelesen haben, der Scrum, Kanban oder andere agile Methoden in den Weiten der .NET Entwicklung einsetzen möchte.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
Agile software development methodologies have been proven on projects large and small. Nowadays methodology of choice is Scrum. It empowers multidisciplinary teams to successfully implement complex software and ensures the continuous flow of value through the development process.

This book will teach you how to successfully implement Scrum using integrated set of tools from Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 (VS) and the Team Foundation Server 2010 (TFS) and create automated process maximizing flow of value. In addition to the usual sprint and daily cycles, TFS based implementation of such process also exhibits micro cycles like check in and test. Ensuring the flow by making handoffs between team members as efficient as possible, by automating quality enforcing steps i.e. dones and gathering metrics without overhead at every cycle are cornerstones of this efficient process.

The book goes beyond teaching you how to apply Scrum using VS and TFS. Reinforcing the flow of value by introducing removal of waste (bug debt, partially implemented features, unfinished code etc.) impeding the flow and transparency pinpointing the weak spots in the process, further ensure success of the development project. Guckenheimer and Loje teach how to identify different types of waste and deal with them. They do a great job explaining how to read different reports and analyze dashboards to gain real-time insight in progress, quality and other aspects of your project.

VS and TFS aim at empowering the whole team.

Architects can analyze legacy code or continuously validate the current architecture with every daily build using layer diagram.
Developers will learn how to write clean code from the beginning and detect errors early.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Real Life Meets Theory 25. Oktober 2011
Format:Taschenbuch
I really enjoyed reading this book and as it seems it is going to become one of my all time favorite books about software development with Visual Studio. It is written for a practicing audience and it demonstrates how the well-known practices and principles can help produce a high quality software product in the real life. Summed up - this is a must-read book for all Microsoft .NET developers.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Agile Glückwünsche 1. Dezember 2011
Format:Taschenbuch
Lieber Neno,

lange hat es gedauert bis du die Zeit gefunden hast dieses Buch mit seinen wertvollen Erfahrungen aus vielen Kundeneinsätzen zu schreiben. Wir freuen uns sehr darüber und dich im "AIT TeamSystemPro Team" zu haben.
Herzliche Grüße,

Daniel
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Beliebte Markierungen

 (Was ist das?)
&quote;
Technical debt refers to work that needs to be done to achieve the potentially shippable threshold, such as fixing bugs, unit testing, integration testing, performance improvement, security hardening, or refactoring for sustainability. &quote;
Markiert von 5 Kindle-Nutzern
&quote;
The Agile Consensus stresses three fundamental principles that reinforce each other: 1. Flow of value, where value is defined by the customer who is paying for or using this project 2. Continual reduction of waste impeding the flow 3. Transparency, enabling team members to continually improve the above two &quote;
Markiert von 4 Kindle-Nutzern
&quote;
Indeed, this is exactly whats known as the empirical process model, based on what works well in product development and industries with continuous process control. &quote;
Markiert von 4 Kindle-Nutzern

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