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Adam's Curse [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Bryan Sykes

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Bryan Sykes follows up The Seven Daughters of Eve with the equally challenging and well-written Adam's Curse. This time, instead of following humanity's heritage back to the first women, Sykes looks forward to a possible future without men. The seeds of the book's topics were sown when Sykes met a pre-eminent pharmaceutical company chairman who shared his surname. Using the Y chromosome, which is passed nearly unchanged from father to son, the author found that he shared a distant ancestor with the other Sykes. Along the way, he discovered that the Y chromosome was worth examining more closely. The first third of Adam's Curse is devoted to a clear and comprehensive lesson about genetics, the second narrates several fascinating stories of tracing ancestry via the Y chromosome, and the last chapters explore the history of male humanity and its future. Some readers will eagerly skim until they reach Chapter 21, where Sykes gets to the heart of the matter--why and how the Y chromosome has created a world where men overwhelmingly own the wealth and power, commit the crimes, and fight the wars. He uses the structural puniness of the Y chromosome to demonstrate that men are as unnecessary biologically as they are dominant socially. Sykes' provocative and quite personal book is likely to be unpopular among science readers who prefer their biology divorced from sociology, but his points taken in context will be difficult to refute. --Therese Littleton -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Pressestimmen

"'Bryan Sykes is a specialist in deciphering the histories written in our genes'" (Sunday Telegraph) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Werbetext

Are men an endangered species? -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Synopsis

A study of the defining characteristics of men, and the Y chromosome in their DNA, draws on scientific research to explore such issues as the potential for a male homosexual gene and the genetic causes of male aggression. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Buchrückseite

Drawing on his own work at the forefront of modern genetics, Bryan Sykes takes us on a remarkable scientific exploration of the mysteries of the science of sex and gender - with some surprising and controversial results.

Genetically speaking, the only difference between men and women is that where women have two X chromosomes, men have one X and one Y. This one chromosome difference, out of a total of forty-six, holds the key to understanding the huge difference between the sexes.

But a closer look at the all-important Y chromosome reveals some shocking news for men. It is getting smaller. As the generations pass the Y chromosome is being cannibalized by the female genome and worn away by its own inability to recombine. Women are winning the evolutionary battle of the sexes.

The conclusion: men are slowly, but surely, headed for extinction.

-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Bryan Sykes is Professor of Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, has had a remarkable scientific career in genetics. After undertaking medical research into the causes of inherited bone disease, he set out to discover if DNA, the genetic material, could possibly survive in ancient bones. It did and he was the first to report on the recovery of ancient DNA from archaeological bone in the journal "Nature" in 1989. Since then Professor Sykes has been called in as the leading international authority to examine several high profile cases, such as the Ice Man, Cheddar Man and the many individuals claiming to be surviving members of the Russian Royal Family. Alongside this, he and his research team have over the last ten years compiled by far the most complete DNA family tree of our species yet seen.He has always emphasised the importance of the individual in shaping our genetic world. The website www.oxfordancestors.com offers people the chance to find out for themselves, from a DNA sample, where they fit in. As well as a scientist, Bryan Sykes has been a television news reporter and a parliamentary science adviser. He is the author of The Seven Daughters of Eve and Adam's Curse.
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