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ASP.NET MVC in Action: With MvcContrib, NHibernate, and More (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 28. Februar 2009


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Synopsis

HIGHLIGHT An insider's perspective on the ASP.NET MVC framework, a highly-anticipated product that forms the basis for the next version of ASP.NET. DESCRIPTION The MVC pattern is widely accepted as the best practice for web development and is at the core of Rails, Zend Framework, and other modern web dev tools. Microsoft's new ASP.NET MVC Framework offers a fully-supported way for developers to implement MVC in ASP.NET. ASP.NET MVC in Action is a comprehensive guide to MVC-based development for Microsoft ASP.NET developers. It offers a clearly-written introduction both to the ASP.NET MVC Framework and to the MVC approach. The focus is on creating real, maintainable web applications, guiding readers from first-use through real-life scenarios. ASP.NET MVC in Action shows readers how to test each piece of an ASP.NET application using the principles of test-driven development. This book assumes that readers know how to build a standard ASP.NET application and presents most examples in C#. KEY POINTS Expert insider authors have been working with ASP.NET MVC since well before it was publicly announced Written for the working ASP.N

ET developer Introduces test driven development and Agile processes - which may be unfamiliar to Microsoft developers MARKET INFORMATION Microsoft's ASP.NET is one of the most popular web development tools available, but it is no longer on the leading edge of innovation. Rails, Django, Seaside, and other frameworks have challenged Microsoft to improve ASP.NET. ASP.NET MVC represents the first major step in ASP.NET in many years, and will be embraced rapidly by ASP.NET developers.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Jeffrey Palermo is a software management consultant and the CTO of Headspring Systems in Austin, Texas. Jeffrey specializes in Agile coaching and helps companies double the productivity of software teams. Jeffrey is an MCSD.NET, Microsoft MVP, Certified ScrumMaster, Austin .Net User Group leader, AgileAustin board member, and an INETA speaker and Membership Mentor. He is an ASP.NET expert and has been working with Microsoft on the MVC framework since the initial prototype in March, 2007. Ben Scheirman is a Principal Consultant with Sogeti in Houston, Texas. He studied computer science at the University of Houston and is a Certified ScrumMaster and Microsoft Certified Solution Developer. He enjoys speaking and blogging about Agile development topics in .NET. Jimmy Bogard is a senior consultant with Headspring Systems in Austin, Texas. His focus is using .NET technologies together with Agile methodologies.

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Amazon.com: 14 Rezensionen
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Excellent. Absolutely excellent! 8. November 2009
Von Kaelin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This book delivers the "how." Whereas so many books show the mechanics of MVC, this book shows you how to drive this implementation of the framework to it's limits. It's the difference between being taught the rules of football and being taught how to win a game; the difference between knowing how to turn on a light saber and knowing how to use the force.

Don't use this book for an intro to MVC. Use the free chapter of the nerd dinner book for that. That's a great intro. Use the web itself to research the mechanics of how the web works. Then pick up this book and be prepared to work *hard* chewing slowly and digesting each section as you let it change the way you think. Don't let the mere 350 pages fool you (when compared with other 600-700 page Goliaths); this book is content-rich. In the same way that the lessons of a truly great coach extend into so many non-sports areas of his/her players' lives, the ideas and knowledge expressed in this book extend well beyond ASP.Net MVC and push us forward into becoming better developers in any technology.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A must have book if you want to develop ASP.NET MVC applications the right way! 18. September 2009
Von Andrew Siemer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
The ASP.NET MVC framework was just released as a preview when I started to write my first book (ASP.NET 3.5 Social Networking). In the early days of design decisions for my book I was faced with the problem of building with the MVP pattern or the new MVC pattern/framework. At that time there was next to nothing regarding the use of the ASP.NET MVC framework (proper or improper).

Shortly after I got started with my project (which I chose to do in MVP) I was asked to do a review for the ASP.NET MVC in Action book. I gladly accepted and started to read as Jeffrey Palermo, Ben Scheirman, and Jimmy Bogard explored the world of ASP.NET MVC offerings. I thought that they did a very good job of describing how Microsoft meant you to use the new framework and a better job of describing how to break beyond the limitations of the current offerings. They go above and beyond to describe best practices early on.

I must say that this is one of the few books that I have ever read cover to cover so many times! With each review of the book I went through each chapter to find any updates. As this book was being written several new CTP's of the ASP.NET MVC framework were released. With each of the CTP releases came a new rendering of the book. It was quite fun to see how quickly things changed over the year that this book was written.

Finally having the final review in my hands and being so very familiar with it's content, I have to say that of all the books on the ASP.NET MVC framework the ASP.NET MVC in Action book should be at the top of your list for things to purchase in the upcoming months. At a quick glance this book covers all things relating to ASP.NET MVC and then some. This book is not just a regurgitation of MSDN or other resource as so many books are these days. Here are the chapter titles for this book:

-Getting started with the ASP.NET MVC Framework
-The Model in depth
-The Controller in depth
-Views in depth
-Routing
-Customizing and extending the ASP.NET MVC Framework
-Scaling the architecture to more complex sites
-Leveraging existing ASP.NET features
-AJAX in ASP.NET MVC (which includes coverage of jQuery!)
-Hosting and Deployment
-Exploring MonoRail and Ruby on Rails
-Best Practices
-Recipes

As you can clearly see from the above this is more than just the XYZ of ASP.NET MVC. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in breaking away from the pains of ASP.NET WebForms. This framework, especially with the help of this new book, makes programming for the web fun again!

Andrew Siemer ([...])
Teacher, Author, Engineer, Architect, Build Master, Scrum Master, Father of 6, Husband, ex Army Ranger
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Very Good... 23. September 2009
Von Mark Phillips - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I found the book very helpful. However, it is not a beginner's book. The authors have a lot of knowledge about MVC and how to effectively use it. But the reader has to dig into the downloaded source code to obtain a lot of that knowledge. I would have preferred a more detailed text instead.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Lots of information, hard to follow 7. Mai 2010
Von S. Wilson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I found this book hard to read and sure enough, a number of people have left similar comments. I feel that this book could have been much better had the authors spent more time (and added more pages) on topics they seem to breeze over rather quickly.

There's definitely a lot of information in this; but unless you're already familiar with what's going on in the community, you might struggle. You might say, "Well yah, this book is written for advanced users!" If that were the case, then I probably wouldn't need this book; it's written more like a contemporary digest of community happenings.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
This book should be re-titled to CodeCampServer using MvcContrib with the help of ASP.Net MVC 18. Mai 2010
Von Neural Contemplator - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I thought I was really suffering from ADD while reading this book until I read the other reviewers comments. This book is ALL over the place. I hate the newest trend of technical authors that use the all-too-common cop-out of "this is beyond the scope of this book." If that's the case, that's fine, but don't use it for every single thing that you mention...otherwise you need to refine the focus of your book so you don't have to mention these concepts that you're not going to explain anyway. At one point the authors go so far as to say that they'd rather not fully explain something to force the readers to discover on their own...???...ummm, if I wanted to do that, I'd dig through all the wikis and blogs and documentation by myself and not read their book...

I was tricked into thinking the book would be a good addition to my library when I skimmed over the first five chapters. These introductory chapters covered the basics - introducing the concepts and the components (ch 1) - i.e., how to click through the wizard in Visual Studio to create a new MVC application, the model (ch 2), the controller (ch 3), the view (ch 4) and how routing works (ch 5). At this point I was thinking to myself - "alright, we've introduced the basic ideas, now let's get down to business and start building some cool stuff..." Although the first five chapters were heavily influenced with technologies that evolved in the MvcContrib project, I forgave them this during the intro because they promised to later dig deeper, but they must have forgotten the shovel because it was at this point that the train went off the tracks...

Chapters 6 - 13 - just started digging a hole without any details. This is the point where they started referencing (not explaining) every single open source project available for MVC without giving a full example or preference to anything described. Chapter 6 had a lot of potential because it started talking about integrating IoC containers into the Controller framework, but I honestly was more confused by the time I finished the chapter than when I had started. Chapter 7 (scaling the architecture) again sounded like it would hold good information...not so much. Chapter 8 - using ASP.Net controls in parallel with MVC? Excellent!!! So I can use my legacy ASP.Net controls in the new framework? No, not so much..but the authors take a good 20 pages to say so. Chapter 9 - the all important AJAX chapter - covered the basics and then left the rest to the reader to discover. Chapter 10 - Hosting and deploying...really? Chapter 11 - Exploring MonoRail and Ruby on Rails - why is this on a book about ASP.Net MVC???? Chapter 12 - Best Practices - this chapter did have solid nuggets of information that are reusable, but most were simply re-iterations of other people (notably Martin Fowler). Chapter 13 - Recipes - Ok, hopefully the books ends on a solid note...hmmmm...nope, after finishing possibly the most confusing and rambling explanation of integrating NHibernate I've ever read I put the book down.

All in all, the book had huge ambition. The problem is that the authors mistakenly thought that writing about open source projects would be useful when in fact the open source community changes so rapidly that even though this book has a 2010 copyright date, all of the libraries mentioned are several versions out of date.

I would not recommend this book to ANYONE trying to learn ASP.NET MVC. Perhaps the second edition will correct the serious flaws in this version.
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