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1493: How the Ecological Collision of Europe and the Americas Gave Rise to the Modern World Kindle Edition

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Kindle Edition, 15. September 2011
EUR 12,56

Word Wise: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

A New York Times Notable Book
A TIME Magazine Best Book of the Year
A Washington Post Notable Book

"Fascinating. . . . Lively. . . . A convincing explanation of why our world is the way it is."
The New York Times Book Review 

"Even the wisest readers will find many surprises here. . . . Like 1491, Mann's sequel will change worldviews."
San Francisco Chronicle 
 
"Exemplary in its union of meaningful fact with good storytelling, 1493 ranges across continents and centuries to explain how the world we inhabit came to be."
The Washington Post
 
“Engaging . . . Mann deftly illuminates contradictions on a human scale: the blind violence and terror at Jamestown, the cruel exploitation of labor in the silver mines of Bolivia, the awe felt by Europeans upon first seeing a rubber ball bounce.”
The New Yorker

“Revelatory.”
—Lev Grossman, Time Magazine
 
“Compelling and eye-opening.”
Publishers Weekly Top 100 Books of 2011
 
“A book to celebrate. . . A bracingly persuasive counternarrative to the prevailing mythology about the historical significance of the ‘discovery’ of America. . . 1493 is rich in detail, analytically expansive and impossible to summarize. . . [Mann’s book] deserves a prominent place among that very rare class of books that can make a difference in how we see the world, although it is neither a polemic nor a work of advocacy. Thoughtful, learned and respectful of its subject matter, 1493 is a splendid achievement.”
The Oregonian
 
“Despite his scope, Mann remains grounded in fascinating details. . . . Such technical insights enhance a very human story, told in lively and accessible prose.”
Cleveland Plain-Dealer
 
“Mann’s excitement never flags as he tells his breathtaking story. . . There is grandeur in this view of the past that looks afresh at the different parts of the world and the parts each played in shaping it.”
Financial Times
 
“A muscular, densely documented follow-up [to Mann’s 1491]. . . Like its predecessor, 1493 runs to more than 400 pages, but it moves at a gallop. . . As a historian Mann should be admired not just for his broad scope and restless intelligence but for his biological sensitivity. At every point of his tale he keeps foremost in his mind the effect of humans’ activities on the broader environment they inhabit.”
The Wall Street Journal
 
“Evenhandedness, a sense of wonder, the gift of turning a phrase. . . Mann loves the world and adopts it as his own.”
Science
 
“Charles C. Mann glories in reality, immersing his reader in complexity. . . . The worn clichés crumble as readers gain introductions to the freshest of the systems of analysis gendered in the first post-Columbian millennium.”
—Alfred W. Crosby, author of The Columbian Exchange
 
“In the wake of his groundbreaking book 1491 Charles Mann has once again produced a brilliant and riveting work that will forever change the way we see the world. Mann shows how the ecological collision of Europe and the Americas transformed virtually every aspect of human history. Beautifully written, and packed with startling research, 1493 is a monumental achievement."
—David Grann, author of The Lost City of Z
 
“[1493] is readable and well-written, based on his usual broad research, travels and interviews. A fascinating and important topic, admirably told.”
—John Hemming, author of Tree of Rivers
 
“Fascinating. . . Convincing. . . A spellbinding account of how an unplanned collision of unfamiliar animals, vegetables, minerals and diseases produced unforeseen wealth, misery, social upheaval and the modern world.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
“A fascinating survey. . . A lucid historical panorama that’s studded with entertaining studies of Chinese pirate fleets, courtly tobacco rituals, and the bloody feud between Jamestown colonists and the Indians who fed and fought them, to name a few. Brilliantly assembling colorful details into big-picture insights, Mann’s fresh challenge to Eurocentric histories puts interdependence at the origin of modernity.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review
 
“Charles Mann expertly shows how the complex, interconnected ecological and economic consequences of the European discovery of the Americas shaped many unexpected aspects of the modern world. This is an example of the best kind of history book: one that changes the way you look at the world, even as it informs and entertains.”
—Tom Standage, author of A History of the World in Six Glasses
 
“A landmark book. . . Entrancingly provocative, 1493 bristles with illuminations, insights and surprises.”
Shelf Awareness
 
“Fascinating. . . Engaging and well-written. . . Information and insight abound on every page. This dazzling display of erudition, theory and insight will help readers to view history in a fresh way.”
BookPage
 
“Spirited. . . One thing is indisputable: Mann is definitely global in his outlook and tribal in his thinking. . . Mann’s taxonomy of the ecological, political, religious, economic, anthropological and mystical melds together in an intriguing whole cloth.”
The Star-Ledger
 
“Mann has managed the difficult trick of telling a complicated story in engaging and clear prose while refusing to reduce its ambiguities to slogans. He is not a professional historian, but most professionals could learn a lot from the deft way he does this. . . 1493 is thoroughly researched and up-to-date, combining scholarship from fields as varied as world history, immunology, and economics, but Mann wears his learning lightly. He serves up one arresting detail after another, always in vivid language. Most impressive of all, he manages to turn plants, germs, insects and excrement into the lead actors in his drama while still parading before us an unforgettable cast of human characters. He makes even the most unpromising-sounding subjects fascinating. I, for one, will never look at a piece of rubber in quite the same way now. . . The Columbian Exchange has shaped everything about the modern world. It brought us the plants we tend in our gardens and the pests that eat them. And as it accelerates in the 21st century, it may take both away again. If you want to understand why, read 1493.”
The New York Times Book Review
 
“Mann is trying to do much more than punch holes in conventional wisdom; he’s trying to piece together an elaborate, alternative history that describes profound changes in the world since the original voyage of Columbus. What's most surprising is that he manages to do this in such an engaging way. He writes with an incredibly dry wit.”
Austin American-Statesman
 
“Mann’s book is jammed with facts and factoids, trivia and moments of great insight that take on power as they accumulate.”
The Washington Post
 
“Although many have written about the impact of Europeans on the New World, few have told the worldwide story in a manner accessible to lay readers as effectively as Mann does here.”
Library Journal
 
“The chief strength of Mann’s richly associative books lies in their ability to reveal new patterns among seemingly disparate pieces of accepted knowledge. They’re stuffed with forehead-slapping ‘aha’ moments. . . If Mann were to work his way methodically through the odd-numbered years of history, he could be expected to publish a book about the global impact of the Great Recession sometime in the middle of the next millennium. If it’s as good as 1493, it would be worth the wait.”
Richmond Times-Dispatch
 
“None of us could travel with Columbus in 1492. But that’s OK, because in 1493 we can take an even more exhilarating ride. This powerful rethinking of the origins and consequences of globalization is so illuminating, it’s scary.”
—Carl Safina, author of A Sea In Flames and The View From Lazy Point
 
“Almost mind-boggling in its scope, enthusiasm and erudition. . . Almost every page of 1493 contains some extraordinarily provocative argument or arrestingly bizarre detail. . . Ranging freely across time and space, Mann’s book is full of compelling stories. . . A tremendously provocative, learned and surprising read.”
The Times of London

Kurzbeschreibung

Two hundred million years ago the earth consisted of a single vast continent, Pangea, surrounded by a great planetary sea. Continental drift tore apart Pangaea, and for millennia the hemispheres were separate, evolving almost entirely different suites of plants and animals. Columbus's arrival in the Americas brought together these long-separate worlds. Many historians believe that this collision of ecosystems and cultures - the Columbian Exchange - was the most consequential event in human history since the Neolithic Revolution. And it was the most consequential event in biological history since the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Beginning with the world of microbes and moving up the species ladder to mankind, Mann rivetingly describes the profound effect this exchanging of species had on the culture of both continents.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 10078 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 720 Seiten
  • Verlag: Granta Books (15. September 2011)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B005WJ4LO0
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen 8 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #210.859 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Von Felix Richter TOP 500 REZENSENT am 15. November 2013
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
…sag' ich als jemand, der seinerzeit dieses Fach in der Schule gehasst hat. Man muss sie nur richtig aufbereiten! Genau das hat Charles C. Mann mit seinem neuen Buch "1493" gemacht, in dem er die im wahrsten Sinn des Wortes weltbewegenden Folgen der sogenannten Entdeckung Amerikas analysiert.

Er räumt gründlich mit der Vorstellung auf, dass die Globalisierung und ihre Konsequenzen ein Phänomen der Neuzeit sei. (Der Unterschied zwischen der Zeit nach 1492 und heute ist höchstens, dass wir heute wissen (sollten) was wir tun.) Damals wurde mit dem interkontinentalen Austausch von Menschen, Tieren und Pflanzen, einschließlich ihrer Krankheiten, ein unaufhaltsamer und unumkehrbarer Prozess in Gang gesetzt, mit katastrophalen Konsequenzen für die einen, mit segensreichen für die anderen - die katastrophalen meist nachhaltig, die segensreichen manchmal sehr kurzfristig.

Bei so einem gewaltigen Themenkomplex müssen natürlich Schwerpunkte gesetzt werden. Einer davon ist das Schicksal der afrikanischen Sklaven in Nord- und Südamerika, deren historische Relevanz sich beileibe nicht nur auf ihre Arbeitskraft unter europäischer Knute beschränkt. Die auf allen Seiten verlustreichen Eroberungszüge von Cortez und Pizarro werden beschrieben, ebenso wie die Entdeckung von Potosí und der daraus entstandene Handel zwischen Spanien und China (Silber für Seide) mit dem Dreh-und Angelpunkt Manila.
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Who would haved guessed that the Little Ice Age of the 16th century was caused by Global Cooling tracing to the decimation of native American human populations following the first contacts with the Old World? That and a thousand of other connections are the fascinating revelations of 1493. A must read for anyone interested in the forces that drive long-term historical developments.
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Having read the pre-Columbian history ("1491") by author Charles Mann and liked it, I got this one fresh off the press. It is perhaps even better. The book covers the so-called Columbian exchange, which describes the exchange of material things between the continents via the newly connected American hub. People were coming to the Americas to settle, some were being enslaved and brought to work in the Americas, then there were plants and animals exchanged and also insects and pestilences. The only thing not covered systematically in this book is the exchange of ideas, but that would have turned a big problem worse: what to cover of a subject that could fill thousands of pages easily?

I think Charles Mann did well by dividing the material into four parts that cover the continents. The first part retells the history of the first settlers and their problems with diseases. Part two tells the story of the silver trade after the mine of Potosi was discovered by the Spanish. Being an economist myself, this is the part of the book I like best. I was not aware that much of that silver went to China instead of Spain and that the problems there were that interesting (piracy, anyone?). This chapter is recommended to everybody who is interested in monetary history.

Mann also addresses the question why China did not proceed with its fleet in the early 15th century. While others blame Chinese culture, he gives more prominence to the argument that the Chinese were quite advanced and on their travels discovered hardly anything which they would like to acquire. A story that runs through the book the whole time is that what we think of as domestic plants and animals and identify with home actually includes some species that originate from places far, far away.
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"We know that we are of God, and the whole world lies under the sway of the wicked one." -- 1 John 5:19 (NKJV)

Don't miss this book! It's a tour de force!

In 1493, author Charles C. Mann accomplishes that most difficult of all nonfiction tasks: changing our perception of the world as it is . . . and how it got to be that way. Bravo!

To make the points easier to appreciate, he focuses on a few economic, biological, and physical aspects of how Columbus's voyages fundamentally changed the world. You'll learn about trading silver for silks in the Philippines, the influence of malaria and yellow fever on slavery, how crops and agricultural practices create other problems and opportunities, a sovereign debt crisis in Spain, hidden "kingdoms" of escaped slaves, miracle crops you think of as being part of "home" that you didn't realize came from another continent, and many stupid things that greedy people and governments do. You'll come away with a sense of wonder about how small things can become huge influences.

The book, no doubt, will also encourage you to want to read more about the topics raised in it. In some cases, you'll want to visit places you've never thought about before. The excellent footnotes will make either activity easy to pursue.

In my case, I realized what a close thing it was that I'm alive today. If my Scottish indentured servant ancestors had been sent to North Carolina rather than Delaware, you probably wouldn't be reading this review.
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